Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Royal Dutch Shell A LSE:RDSA London Ordinary Share GB00B03MLX29 'A' ORD EUR0.07
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -25.00p -1.21% 2,048.00p 2,049.50p 2,050.50p 2,057.00p 2,027.00p 2,050.50p 4,452,223.00 16:35:21
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Oil & Gas Producers 179,823.5 1,389.3 21.0 84.1 89,496.67

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03/12/201600:21ROYAL DUTCH SHELL 'A'588.00
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03/12/2016
08:20
Shell A Daily Update: Royal Dutch Shell A is listed in the Oil & Gas Producers sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker RDSA. The last closing price for Shell A was 2,073p.
Royal Dutch Shell A has a 4 week average price of 2,010.80p and a 12 week average price of 1,986.19p.
The 1 year high share price is 2,140p while the 1 year low share price is currently 1,256p.
There are currently 4,369,954,444 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 7,753,695 shares. The market capitalisation of Royal Dutch Shell A is £89,496,667,013.12.
01/11/2016
11:45
waldron: News & Tips: BP, Royal Dutch Shell, Shire & more Today's market overview News & Tips: BP, Royal Dutch Shell, Shire & more London shares are up a little on the first day of the month, but trading has been choppy. Click here for The Trader Nicole Elliott's latest thoughts on the markets. IC TIP UPDATES: On any given day, the share price movements of Royal Dutch Shell (RDSB) and BP (BP.) tend to move in tandem with expectations for the oil price, but today was an exception. Shell stock rose 4 per cent this morning thanks to better than expected third quarter underlying profits of $2.8bn and strong output from the assets it acquired from BG last year. We remain buyers. Meanwhile, BP shares dropped by 3 per cent after forecasts for the company’s upstream division fell below analyst expectations. However, the group’s 48 per cent year-on-year decline in underlying replacement cost profit – the industry’s preferred measure of profitability – was ahead of forecasts. The oil major also used its results to announce the appointment of former Maersk and Carlsberg chief Nils Andersen as a non-executive director. Conviviality (CVR) shares are up more than 4 per cent in early trading following an impressive trading update from the retail group. Group revenues - which has benefitted from the company’s acquisitive strategy - have ballooned 211 per cent to £783m over the 26 weeks ended 30 October, with sales up across every individual business unit. The group now trades via three separate arms: Conviviality Retail for the off-licence chains, Conviviality Trading for events and Conviviality Direct is the company’s wholesale division. Interim results are due in January, but we remain buyers. Express Scripts, the largest pharmaceutical management business in the US, sent Shire (SHP) shares spiralling downwards yesterday after speculating that hemophilia drugs (of which Shire owns many) could be at risk of not being covered by insurance. Shire ended the day trading down 3 per cent. But many believe that this is an over reaction as it is very unlikely that insurers will cease coverage of drugs that are so crucial to managing a potentially life threatening illness. No doubt management at Shire will shed some light on the issue in the third quarter results call later today. Buy Horizon Discovery (HZD) has reassured the market that it’s back to business as normal after it relocated its services business from Boston to the UK. The group announced that its UK site is now fully operational and will perform at maximum capacity for the remainder of 2016. Revenue in excess of £0.8m is expected to be generated between now and early 2017 and the order book already extends to £1.6m the 2017 financial year. Buy It’s not the most comfortable ride over at bus and rail company Go-Ahead (GOG) at the moment but its first quarter update has avoided any major potholes. Its regional bus revenue continues to be impacted by weak economic conditions in the north east of England but revenue still grew 2 per cent in spite of this and passenger journeys rose 0.5 per cent. In London, revenue growth at 4 per cent which, as management had expected, has slowed somewhat. But the group has fully hedged its fuel requirements out to 2018 so at least has its costs under control. In rail, it’s troubled Southern brand, which runs under the Govia joint venture franchise, saw passenger revenue fall 3 per cent and passenger journeys drop 0.5 per cent. Major works at London Bridge station and industrial action by workers have hampered operations here. Its Southeastern and London Midland services both saw revenue and passenger numbers grow. Overseas, it began its first Singaporean bus contract in September and its German rail contracts begin in 2019. We keep our buy rating. Renew Holdings (RNWH) has acquired Giffen Holdings, mechanical, electronic and technical specialist undertaking work for Network Rail and London Underground. For the year ended 30 September 2016 Giffen is expected to record revenue of around £22m and adjusted pre-tax profits of £0.7m. Following the acquisition Giffen will report into Amco Rail, Renew’s railway infrastructure business. Buy. KEY STORIES: The merger between Ladbrokes (LAD) and its private rival Gala Coral has now completed and the group has officially changed its name to Ladbrokes Coral, which will use the ticker LCL. Chief executive Jim Mullen said he would “deliver synergies as quickly as possible” and that the company would continue as the two separate parts had done in terms of “winning in increasingly competitive markets”. Shares in First Derivatives (FDP) climbed 5 per cent after the data analytics and consulting group’s turnover leapt more than a third in the six months to 31 August, driving adjusted cash profits up 26 per cent to £13.6m. Sales of managed services and consulting leapt 21 per cent, largely reflecting the impact of more consultants and managed services contract wins, while software revenues surged 60 per cent. Strong demand from households to switch their insurance and utilities providers drove sales up 12 per cent at Moneysupermarket.com (MONY) in the third quarter to 30 September. The price comparison website’s MoneySavingExpert subsidiary also posted an 8 per cent rise in revenue, as record numbers of customers switched energy suppliers. Shares in Standard Chartered (STAN) fell 6 per cent after the Asia-focused bank reported a decline of around half in pre-tax profits for the first nine months of the year. Operating income was flat at $3.47bn but the group incurred $141m in restructuring charges in relation to its liquidation portfolio and marginally higher operating expenses. Loan impairments were 5 per cent lower at almost $600m. Virgin Money (VM.) reported a rise in net mortgage lending of around a third during the first nine months of the year to £3.5bn. Credit card balances increased 41 per cent to £2.2bn, however implementing tighter credit scores for new applications after the referendum meant growth slowed during the third quarter. However, management said it remains on track to deliver double-digit return on equity for 2017. Non-Standard Finance (NSF) grew credit issued by its Everyday Loans business by almost a fifth during the seven months since acquisition to £120m. Its Loans at Home division also increased a third during the first nine months of the year, although faster than expected growth meant costs and impairments also grew more rapidly. Management has closed some of its smaller agencies. OTHER COMPANY NEWS: Hastings (HSTG) has come a long way in the year since flotation, and the motor insurance specialist lifted gross written premiums by 26 per cent in the nine months to September. Live customer policies rose 16 per cent to 2.29m, and the group increased its market share from 5.6 per cent to 6.4 per cent. Buy. It’s that time of the month again for Premier Oil (PMO). The energy group has again managed to defer a test of its financial covenants until the end of November, as part of negotiations with its lending group. Shares in the firm rose by 2 per cent in early trading.
06/8/2016
06:32
waldron: 2nd quarter 2016 Announcement date July 28, 2016 Ex-dividend date RDS A ADSs and RDS B ADSs August 10, 2016 Ex-dividend date RDS A and RDS B shares August 11, 2016 Record date August 12, 2016 Scrip reference share price announcement date August 18, 2016 Closing of scrip election and currency election (See Note) August 26, 2016 Pounds sterling and euro equivalents announcement date September 5, 2016 Payment date September 19, 2016 Note A different scrip election date may apply to registered and non-registered ADS holders. Registered ADS holders can contact The Bank of New York Mellon for the election deadline that applies. Non-registered ADS holders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. Both a different scrip and currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. The 2016 interim dividend timetable is also available on www.shell.com/dividend
24/6/2016
20:04
waldron: 2nd quarter 2016 Announcement date July 28, 2016 Ex-dividend date RDS A ADSs and RDS B ADSs August 10, 2016 Ex-dividend date RDS A and RDS B shares August 11, 2016 Record date August 12, 2016 Scrip reference share price announcement date August 18, 2016 Closing of scrip election and currency election (See Note) August 26, 2016 Pounds sterling and euro equivalents announcement date September 5, 2016 Payment date September 19, 2016 Note A different scrip election date may apply to registered and non-registered ADS holders. Registered ADS holders can contact The Bank of New York Mellon for the election deadline that applies. Non registered ADS holders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. Both a different scrip and currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. The 2016 interim dividend timetable is also available on www.shell.com/dividend
04/5/2016
06:53
waldron: Royal Dutch Shell RDS Q1 2016 Dividend Announcement 04/05/2016 6:00am UK Regulatory (RNS & others) TIDMRDSA TIDMRDSB ROYAL DUTCH SHELL PLC FIRST QUARTER 2016 INTERIM DIVIDEND The Hague, May 4, 2016 - The Board of Royal Dutch Shell plc ("RDS") today announced an interim dividend in respect of the first quarter of 2016 of US$0.47 per A ordinary share ("A Share") and B ordinary share ("B Share"), equal to the US dollar dividend for the same quarter last year. RDS provides eligible shareholders with a choice to receive dividends in cash or in shares via a Scrip Dividend Programme ("the Programme"). For further details please see below. Details relating to the first quarter 2016 interim dividend It is expected that cash dividends on the B Shares will be paid via the Dividend Access Mechanism from UK-sourced income of the Shell Group. Per ordinary share Q1 2016 RDS A Shares (US$) 0.47 RDS B Shares (US$) 0.47 Cash dividends on A Shares will be paid, by default, in euro, although holders of A Shares will be able to elect to receive dividends in pounds sterling. Cash dividends on B Shares will be paid, by default, in pounds sterling, although holders of B Shares will be able to elect to receive dividends in euro. The pounds sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments will be announced on June 13, 2016. Per ADS Q1 2016 RDS A ADSs (US$) 0.94 RDS B ADSs (US$) 0.94 Cash dividends on American Depository Shares ("ADSs") will be paid, by default, in US dollars. ADS stands for an American Depositary Share. ADR stands for an American Depositary Receipt. An ADR is a certificate that evidences ADSs. ADSs are listed on the NYSE under the symbols RDS.A and RDS.B. Each ADS represents two ordinary shares, two A Shares in the case of RDS.A or two B Shares in the case of RDS.B. In many cases the terms ADR and ADS are used interchangeably. Scrip Dividend Programme RDS provides shareholders with a choice to receive dividends in cash or in shares via the Programme. Under the Programme shareholders can increase their shareholding in RDS by choosing to receive new shares instead of cash dividends, if approved by the Board. Only new A Shares will be issued under the Programme, including to shareholders who currently hold B Shares. In some countries, joining the Programme may currently offer a tax advantage compared with receiving cash dividends. In particular, dividends paid out as shares by the Company will not be subject to Dutch dividend withholding tax (currently 15 per cent), unlike cash dividends paid on A shares, and they will not generally be taxed on receipt by a UK shareholder or a Dutch shareholder. Shareholders who elect to join the Programme will increase the number of shares held in RDS without having to buy existing shares in the market, thereby avoiding associated dealing costs. Shareholders who do not join the Programme will continue to receive in cash any dividends approved by the Board. Shareholders who held only B Shares and joined the Programme are reminded they will need to make a Scrip Dividend Election in respect of their new A Shares if they wish to join the Programme in respect of such new shares. However, this is only necessary if the shareholder has not previously made a Scrip Dividend Election in respect of any new A Shares issued. For further information on the Programme, including how to join if you are eligible, please refer to the appropriate publication available on www.shell.com/scrip. Dividend timetable for the first quarter 2016 interim dividend Announcement date May 4, 2016 Ex-dividend date RDS A and RDS B ADS May 18, 2016 Ex-dividend date RDS A and RDS B shares May 19, 2016 Record date May 20, 2016 Scrip reference share price announcement date May 26, 2016 Closing of scrip election and currency election (See Note) June 6, 2016 Pounds sterling and euro equivalents announcement date June 13, 2016 Payment date June 27, 2016 Note Both a different scrip and currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. A different scrip election date may apply to registered and non-registered ADS holders. Registered ADS holders can contact The Bank of New York Mellon for the election deadline that applies. Non-registered ADS holders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. Taxation - cash dividends Cash dividends on A Shares will be subject to the deduction of Dutch dividend withholding tax at the rate of 15%, which may be reduced in certain circumstances. In April 2016, there were changes to the UK taxation of dividends. The dividend tax credit has been abolished, and a new tax free dividend allowance of GBP5,000 introduced. Dividend income in excess of the allowance will be taxable at the following rates: 7.5% within the basic rate band; 32.5% within the higher rate band; and 38.1% on dividend income taxable at the additional rate. If you are uncertain as to the tax treatment of any dividends you should consult your own tax advisor. Royal Dutch Shell plc Contacts: - Investor Relations: Europe + 31 (0) 70 377 4540; North America +1 832 337 2034 - Media: International +44 (0) 207 934 5550; Americas +1 713 241 4544
28/3/2016
11:06
the grumpy old men: Oil Giants Replaced 75% of Production on Average in 2015 27/03/2016 11:18pm Dow Jones News Shell B (LSE:RDSB) Intraday Stock Chart Today : Monday 28 March 2016 Click Here for more Shell B Charts. By Sarah Kent LONDON--The world's biggest oil companies are draining their petroleum reserves faster than they are replacing them--a symptom of how a deep oil-price decline is reshaping the energy industry's priorities. In 2015, the seven biggest publicly traded Western energy companies, including Exxon Mobil Corp. and Royal Dutch Shell PLC, replaced just 75% of the oil and natural gas they pumped, on average, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of company data. It was the biggest combined drop in inventory that companies have reported in at least a decade. For Exxon, 2015 marked the first time in more than two decades it didn't fully replace production with new reserves, according to the company. It reported replacing 67% of its 2015 output. In the past, shrinking reserves could send investors and executives into a panic over a company's future prospects. These days, with ultralow oil prices, "it becomes less important" to replenish stockpiles, said Luca Bertelli, chief exploration officer at Italian oil producer Eni SpA. Eni has shifted spending away from high-risk, high-reward projects in favor of squeezing more out of fields that are already producing, he said. That shift shows how producers are responding to low prices by pulling back on new exploration in favor of maximizing profits. The risk is that cutting back on new projects now, when prices are low, could lead to shortages and price spikes in the future. Historically, energy companies spent heavily in the present to find resources for the future--new wells that would replace the barrels they pump every day. When they decide they can extract the oil and gas economically, firms book those resources as proved reserves, untapped inventories to be exploited at a profit down the road. The current oil glut has forced companies to cut spending wherever they can. So they have pulled back on exploratory drilling and spending on new projects. Across the oil sector last year, companies approved just six new developments, according to Morgan Stanley researchers. That is in contrast to the past decade, when high prices led energy firms to explore in far-flung regions. They spent billions of dollars on so-called megaprojects, in part to keep their inventories brimming for decades. And those investments helped to fuel today's market glut. Because of accounting rules, there is another drain on the "proved reserves" that companies book and report to investors: low oil prices. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission defines proved reserves as the volume of oil and natural gas that a company can expect to tap at a profit. Some of the reserves companies added are too expensive to extract profitably at today's prices. That has forced some companies to remove barrels from their books, and in some cases to write down the value of those assets. Shell wrote off billions of dollars from the value of its assets last year, and low prices contributed to a decision to cancel a project in Canada's high-cost oil sands. The company didn't replace any of the oil it pumped last year. Overall its reserves shrank by 20%. Despite lower reserves, big oil companies aren't about to run out of crude. Exxon, for instance, retains enough reserves to last 16 years at the current rate of production. And in addition to their still-considerable proved reserves, the companies have access to other resources that could become viable to pump if oil prices rise. Exxon Chief Executive Rex Tillerson told analysts earlier this month the company's failure to fully replace the oil and gas it produced last year reflects its focus on "deploying capital efficiently to create that long-term shareholder value, even if it means interrupting a 21-year trend." SEC rules require oil companies to report "proved" reserves based on an average price each year. On a year-to-year basis, proved reserves can be volatile based on oil-price swings. Last year's sharp price drop forced some companies to reduce their proved reserves, though falling costs helped offset the reductions. Some companies' reserves also benefited from contracts that grant them a larger share of production when prices are low. Among the largest oil companies, only Chevron Corp., Eni and France's Total SA last year added more new barrels than they pumped. BP PLC replaced 61% of its production last year--excluding the impact of sales and acquisitions--and Norway's Statoil ASA replaced 55%. While Shell's reserves fell, the company this year completed a roughly $50 billion acquisition of BG Group PLC that is expected to boost reserves by around 25% from their levels at the end of 2014. Companies' reserve volumes are facing other potential threats beyond low oil prices. Some investors have expressed concern recently that legislation to curb global warming--such as taxing carbon emissions--could hasten a shift to cleaner energy and make fossil fuels more expensive to burn. That could make some oil reserves impossible to pump profitably. Oil companies counter that the world will need large volumes of oil and gas for decades. In a sign of their focus on profitability over finding more oil, some investors have welcomed companies' spending cuts despite the falling reserves. "When the house is burning you're not worrying if you need to paint the outside," said Christopher Wheaton, a fund manager at Allianz Global Investors, which holds stock in several of the large oil companies including Shell, Total and BP. "It's crisis management at the moment." That attitude marks a shift from the early 2000s, when companies responded to investor pressure to grow with aggressive drilling and, in some cases, aggressive accounting. Shell in 2004 admitted to overstating its reserves by more than 20%. Its share price dropped, senior executives left, and the company paid hefty fines. Shell declined to comment. In the years after the Shell scandal, companies raced to find more crude and poured tens of billions of dollars into projects to increase production--helping fuel the current glut and prompting Shell to shift its strategy. In 2014 Shell stopped using growth in oil and gas production as a performance metric for executive bonuses, instead emphasizing return on capital. Write to Sarah Kent at sarah.kent@wsj.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires March 27, 2016 19:03 ET (23:03 GMT)
17/3/2016
17:52
waldron: Is Royal Dutch Shell Plc In Danger Of A Colossal Correction? Public Domain. By Royston Wild - Thursday, 17 March, 2016 | More on: RDSB 0 inShare Shares across the mining and energy sectors have leapt broadly higher in recent weeks thanks to a robust recovery in commodity prices. Fossil fuel leviathan Shell (LSE: RDSB) has been one of these beneficiaries. Since striking a 12-year trough of 1,277p per share back in January, the stock has leapt 33% to claw back above the 1,700p marker just this week. Shell’s resurgence has been underpinned by a bounceback in the oil price. The Brent benchmark reclaimed the $40 per barrel marker earlier this month, up from the multi-year lows of $27.67 hit at the start of 2016. Supply still surging But this robust recovery has no tangible basis, in my opinion, with pumped-up buying activity now leaving the likes of Shell in danger of a shuddering correction. Brent prices moved robustly higher following reports that Russia, along with OPEC members Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Venezuela, had floated the idea of a production freeze. This raised hopes of a much-needed output cut further down the line. News surrounding a potential accord has gone quiet more recently, however, illustrating the colossal roadblocks on all sides. Not only has Russia previously played down chances of a freeze, citing the operational problems caused by the country’s harsh climate, but political faultlines across OPEC itself — and particularly between Saudi Arabia and Iran — also promise to scupper a deal. Crude values have also benefitted from a weakening of the US dollar, brought on by falling expectations of Federal Reserve rate hikes in 2016. And further monetary loosening by the People’s Bank of China and the European Central Bank in recent weeks has also bolstered hopes of improving fossil fuel demand. Demand in the doldrums However, the steady stream of poor data from China illustrates the scale of the problem local lawmakers must overcome to prevent an economic ‘hard landing’, a catastrophic prospect for oil prices. Recent trade data showed Chinese exports fall at their fastest rate since 2009 in February, down 25% year-on-year. And industrial production during the first two months of the year rose by just 5.4%, the worst figure since the 2008/2009 global recession. With global crude inventories already at bursting point — US stockpiles hit fresh record highs for the fifth week on the bounce last week, at 523.2 million barrels — crude prices desperately need positive demand developments, or news of output cuts, in order to stay afloat. What does this mean for Shell? Well, Shell’s rocketing share price has left the business dealing on a monster P/E rating of 22.3 times for 2016, sailing above the benchmark of 10 times associated with high-risk stocks. The company is expected to suffer a 32% earnings slump this year, marking a second consecutive double-digit dip if realised. And Shell does not have splendid long-term earnings prospects to justify this premium, either — the producer continues to slash capex budgets and sell assets to mitigate the effects of subdued oil prices, reducing its ability to eventually mount a comeback when crude prices improve. With Shell’s weak balance sheet also expected to result in huge dividend cuts sooner rather than later, I believe there is plenty of scope for the firm’s share price to clatter lower. But while I am far from convinced by Shell's investment appeal, I am pretty excited about the long-term prospects of the London-quoted dividend giant revealed in this special Fool report. The Motley Fool's BRAND NEW A Top Income Share report looks at a hidden FTSE superstar enjoying breakneck sales growth across the continent, and whose ambitious expansion plans look set to power dividends still higher in the years ahead. To discover more just click here and enjoy this exclusive 'wealth report.' It's 100% free and comes with no obligation. Royston Wild has no position in any shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Royal Dutch Shell. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
15/3/2016
10:39
waldron: Will Royal Dutch Shell Plc Ever Recover To 2570p? Photo: Royal Dutch Shell plc. Fair Use. By Peter Stephens - Tuesday, 15 March, 2016 | More on: RDSB 0 inShare Shares in Shell (LSE: RDSB) have surged by 17% in the last three months, with the rising oil price being a key reason behind this. Of course, there’s still a long way to go before the price of black gold and the price of Shell reach their previous highs. In the case of Shell, its shares reached 2,570p in May of last year, which is their 10-year high. For them to hit that level again, they would need to rise by 54% from their current level. On the one hand, this could be achieved before the end of the year if the company’s share price continues to rise at the same pace as it has done in the last three months. While this is entirely possible, it seems unlikely, since the price of oil may not increase at a rapid rate. That’s simply down to a major imbalance between demand and supply, which is showing little sign of rapidly reversing over the short term. As a result, Shell’s comeback is likely to be a more gradual affair, although one that’s very much on the cards. A key reason for this is the company’s low valuation, which provides significant upward rerating potential. For example, Shell trades on a forward price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of 12.2 and so for its shares to trade at 2,570p, it would require a rating of 18.8. While high, this isn’t unreasonably so, which means that even with Shell’s financial year 2017 profitability assumed to continue over the medium-to-long term, a share price of 2,570p is achievable. Size matters Of course, Shell’s net profit is unlikely to flatline in the long run. That’s at least partly because there’s the prospect of a higher oil price as the current level becomes uneconomic for a number of producers. On this front, Shell has a major advantage. Due to its size and scale, Shell should be able to maintain and even gain market share over the medium-to-long term as higher-cost producers struggle to survive. This should allow it to maximise profitability and with it having the potential to engage in future M&A activity, Shell also has the capacity to boost its financial performance through acquisitions due to a strong cash flow and modestly leveraged balance sheet. Therefore, Shell’s P/E ratio may not need to rise to as high as 18.8 in order for its shares to reach 2,570p. However, if the company is able to deliver upbeat profit growth, then a rising rating could be the end product as investor sentiment improves. Clearly, Shell’s future is highly dependent on the price of oil and realistically, for its shares to hit 2,570p once more, the price of oil will need to move higher. However, even if it doesn’t, Shell has the financial firepower to become a more dominant player within the oil and gas space, which should lead to greater profitability and a higher share price in the long run. As such, buying Shell now seems to be a sound move. Of course, Shell isn't the only company that could be worth buying at the present time. With that in mind, the analysts at The Motley Fool have written a free and without obligation guide called 5 Shares You Can Retire On. The five companies in question offer stunning dividend yields, have fantastic long-term potential, and trade at very appealing valuations. As such, they could deliver excellent returns and provide your portfolio with a major boost in 2016 and beyond. Click here to find out all about them - it's completely free and without obligation to do so. Peter Stephens owns shares of Royal Dutch Shell. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Royal Dutch Shell B. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
02/3/2016
16:40
waldron: Citywire Money > News Income star tips Shell to yield 20% over two years Citywire AAA-rated Chris White says that 'the market is wrong' to challenge the sustainability of the oil major's dividend policy. Markets Other markets FTSE 100Prev: 6152.88 ▼ 0.31%19.27 6133.615:22 PM 13:0017:0021:006,1006,1256,1506,1756,200 Market Data Notice More market charts Favourites (0) Sign in for alerts Add funds, managers, shares and investment trusts to your Citywire favourite's list here. Register or Sign in, and we will email you when we have news on them. by Sean Butters on Mar 02, 2016 at 08:00 Income star tips Shell to yield 20% over two years Chris White, Premier Asset Management’s head of UK equities, argues a reversal in oil sentiment could push Shell (RDSb + Add to favourites ) to yield the best part of 20% over the next two years. Although the Citywire AAA-rated manager of the Premier Monthly Income + Add to favourites fund is wary of jumping the gun on calling the bottom of the oil price, he does believe the end is in sight. ‘Oil price weakness could continue for another couple of months,’ said White. ‘However, it is a supply problem rather than a demand one. Saudi Arabia and the Opec nations will eventually get their act together and reduce supply, and the price will probably start to recover in the second half of this year,' he said. While admitting that the price could slide further, ultimately White sees it recovering once oil production is constrained. ‘Market equilibrium should be restored, and if this happens, we will see a very sharp bounce in the oil price. If all the producers tighten supply by 2%, then the oil price will rocket – along with the share price,’ he said. ‘Considering all the shorts in under-pressure oil companies, why shouldn’t the oil price move like a share price when good news comes out? All the shorts would get closed, and the price would move up remarkably fast – as much as $10 in a day and $15 in two.’ While White (pictured) admits that Shell and BP (BP + Add to favourites ), which represent Premier Monthly Income weightings of 5% and 2% respectively, have both suffered more damage than he initially expected, he remains confident on their future prospects, particularly Shell’s. ‘The market is challenging my assumption that Shell will maintain its dividend,’ he said, referring to fears the oil major may be on the brink of its first cut since 1945. ‘The market is wrong.’ ‘I have been a little bit surprised by how much BP and Shell share prices have fallen. I thought they would have been held up by their dividend yield – I wasn’t expecting Shell to drop this far. ‘But [the speculation] has been overdone. My core belief is that Shell will keep its dividend yield for the rest of the year, and there is a reasonable chance that it will next year as well. If that is the case, then Shell shares are cheap and will yield the best part of 20% over the next two years.’ In the 12 months to 31 December, Premier Monthly returned 9.5% versus a UK Equity Income average of 6.46%, while in the five years to December-end the performance was 66.6% versus the peer group’s 56.8%.
18/2/2016
01:00
maywillow: Tax Withheld on Foreign Dividends? April 11, 2013 3:43 PM Subscribe Last year, I bought shares in Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A), because I like the $3.44/share dividend they pay, making it a good place to park spare investing cash. (That is, I don’t really care about the share price, if only up to a point, as long as my investment is yielding 5.32% annually.) Foreign tax is withheld on the dividend payments, which I get back by claiming the total as a foreign tax credit on my federal tax return. What I don’t understand is, when foreign tax is withheld, who is withholding it? Am I correct in assuming that it is an IRS-mandated withholding, and that by claiming the credit the withholding is canceled out? Any comments addressing my “spare investing cash” strategy also invited. posted by Short Attention Sp to Work & Money (4 answers total) 1 user marked this as a favorite The foreign tax withheld is Dutch tax. It's withheld at some custodian or broker above you and remitted to the Dutch government. You get a credit for US taxes you would otherwise pay on the same money. The IRS has nothing to do with the imposition of the withholding, though Treasury negotiated the US-Dutch tax treaty, which supplants the normal dividend withholding rate. posted by Admiral Haddock at 4:53 PM on April 11, 2013 [1 favorite] The foreign tax withheld here isn't going to the IRS, it is going to the foreign country concerned (for RDS.A, I believe it is the Netherlands, but your 1099-DIV should say for sure). That tax is paid to the foreign government because you likely owe them some amount of tax on the dividends, and they don't think you're particularly likely to pay up voluntarily as someone living on the other side of the planet with no ties to their country. Since you're not going to be filing a Dutch tax return anytime soon, the withholding makes sure that the Netherlands get their tax revenue without any action on your part. So Shell (or an agent who handles such things) takes out the withholding and pays it to the Dutch government on your behalf before you get your dividend. Instead of having to go to the Netherlands to get any money back, you can take the US foreign tax credit and have your US tax bill reduced by, ideally, the same amount you paid in tax to the Netherlands. Since this is US tax law we're talking about, some restrictions apply, and you might not be able to get the full amount back, especially if you have an especially high or low income or the stock is held in a tax-advantaged retirement account. You should note that there are some additional options with RDS's two share classes, about which Seeking Alpha nicely discusses the tax differences. The distinction is particularly useful if you become subject to the AMT, which can reduce your foreign tax credit. posted by zachlipton at 5:14 PM on April 11, 2013 [1 favorite] Why would you park spare cash in a single stock? If by "park spare investing cash" you mean "somewhere to keep cash handy until I use it for something in a year or so," this strategy is incredibly risky, and no competent financial advisor would recommend that you do it. In this case, you park spare cash in a MMA or CD or some other short-term equivalent and live with the fact that you will not make much in the way of interest (on the other hand, you won't have much in the way of transaction fees, either). If by "park spare investing cash" you mean "invest for the long term," then your strategy is also risky. Why bet on one company's shares instead of diversifying? You can probably see that my bias tilts toward managing volatility and risk and away from trying to win big by betting my investment on one particular company's shares. If you already have lots of diverse investments, I'd just plow this spare investing cash into more of the same rather than being overweighted in one particular stock. If you don't have lots of diverse investments, then you're basically gambling with your investment money. posted by MoonOrb at 6:21 PM on April 11, 2013 As a general rule, any investment which yields a higher return than you would get investing in treasury bonds or in a savings account is worthwhile - in the US yields on savings are at historic lows, and because of inflation you actually lose money if you let it sit in a savings account or T-bills. However, if you are not putting your shares in an IRA, tax has to be taken into consideration and subtracted from your returns to give you an accurate picture of your net gains. Here's another Seeking Alpha article about tax implications of ADRs. Something else to consider for non-IRA investments is that your tax rate on gains is much lower if you hold your shares for at least a year. Dividends are taxed at a different rate, but that's only for qualified dividends (many ADRs do not qualify, and sometimes their dividends are considered ordinary income by the IRS). If you invest in a solid company with a proven dividend track record, and if you reinvest your dividends in more shares rather than taking it in cash, your yield on your dividends is compounded (usually quarterly, or whenever the dividend is paid). Compound interest is a very powerful investment tool over time. Also, you're correct- the share price itself is mostly irrelevant. What matters is gains, yield, tax rates, etc. The main problem I see with your current approach is that you didn't understand the tax implications of your investment before you put your money at risk. All investment carries risk. Understanding and mitigating or managing risk is the key to investing. Also, you really do want to take into consideration how much hassle certain types of investments will be, not only for initial research, but also the work you will have to do later when filling out your tax forms (or how much you will have to pay someone else to do it). Some investments will give you slightly better returns than others but sometimes have outright Byzantine layers of taxes involved from numerous countries, states, municipalities, etc (many funds have these issues). The hassle may or may not be worth it to you, even for larger potential gains, but in any event it's always worth taking the time to research thoroughly any investment before putting your money on the table, and to understand your objectives and strategies as an investor and how any particular company would fit into that strategy and help meet your objectives, and most importantly, what's your plan if your investment loses value - if you don't know, don't put your money at risk! It's not as hard as it sounds (as long as you're not being unrealistic about your goals), but if you don't do the work you will get slapped around by the market sooner or later. Depending on how much money you have at risk, that could be a seriously painful lesson, so instead learn to mitigate your risk as much as possible by doing your homework and following an investment strategy and plan. Honestly, if you do the basic research by looking at the balance sheet and financial and earnings history of the company, you'll be way ahead of the vast majority of people who manage their own investments, and even those who pay others to do it for them. posted by krinklyfig at 6:28 PM on April 11, 2013 [1 favorite]
17/2/2016
22:19
maywillow: BG acts as a painkiller for Royal Dutch Shell amid lower oil prices Published by Sam Hason on February 17, 2016 at 1:26 pm EST RDS.A img BG acts as a painkiller for Royal Dutch Shell amid lower oil prices Merrill Lynch expects Shell’s earnings to rise by 576% in 2016 as a result of integration Royal Dutch Shell's plc (ADR) (NYSE:RDS.A) merger with BG Group has been at the center of debate amid lower for longer crude oil prices. The Anglo-Dutch company had faced criticism from several shareholders and analysts over the viability of the deal under distressed commodity prices. Shell proposed to acquire BG in April last year. At the time, oil prices were over $55 per barrel, and it expected the price to recover to an average of $65 per barrel. Since oil prices have fallen in every quarter since the deal was announced, analysts and shareholders were left worried over the financial viability of the merger under distressed oil prices. The WTI benchmark for oil fell to as low as $26.55 last month. However, Shell managed to convince a majority of its shareholders in favor of the BG deal, which was formally completed on February 15th. Making the case for the merger, Shell stated that the deal would provide the combined company with long-term strategic benefits, giving it the advantage of BG’s assets. Shell also stated that the combined group is expected to generate $30-40 billion of cash annually. The Dutch company plans to cut 10,000 jobs from the combined company and sell assets worth $30 billion over the period of 3 years. Bank of America Merrill Lynch (BoAML) remains bullish about Shell since it believes the merger would help the Dutch company outperform its peers in Europe in 2016. The research firm, in its sell side report published on February 16, retained its Buy rating for Shell, with a 12 month target price of $61.90 per share. BoAML expects a 40% upside potential in Shell’s stock price, stating that the current share price of the company reflects mistrust towards the successful integration of both the companies. The investment firm believes that the Anglo-Dutch company entered the “path of pain” sooner than its peers, which would provide the oil major to withstand the lower for longer oil price environment better than competitors. The sell-side report estimates that BG would allow the oil major to aggressively cut its capital spending, without worrying about lower production on an immediate basis, as the integration would contribute an additional 20% to Shell’s production and resource base. Furthermore, BoAML expects that the merger would increase Shell's free cash flow (FCF) by more than 30%, and strengthen the company’s ability to maintain dividend payments to its shareholders during the oil crisis. The research report estimates that BG's FCF covers an additional 20% of the oil major’s dividend until 2017. The investment bank believes Shell’s dividend yield of 9%, which is higher than the industry average of 6.5%, is mispriced in its shares, as investors continue to value BG’s acquisition at the oil price of $60 per barrel, and ignore the synergies that the deal would provide. The sell-side report estimates Shell's earnings per share (EPS) to rise by more than 575% year-over-year (YoY) in FY16, since it views BG's integration into Shell as a “painkiller221;. BoAML argues that the combined group remains one of the few majors to deal with the “big oil trilemma” which includes maintaining dividends, sustaining production base, and maintaining credit ratings, under the lower oil price conditions. Shell has performed quite well so far in 2016, having lose just 39 cents year-to-date (YTD) as of February 16. While the WTI index slipped more than 21%, to $29.04 per barrel.
Shell A share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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