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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Tekmar Group Plc LSE:TGP London Ordinary Share GB00BDFGGK53 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 79.50 77.00 82.00 79.50 79.50 79.50 75,607 07:37:39
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Oil Equipment Services & Distribution 40.9 2.0 3.9 20.6 40

Tekmar Share Discussion Threads

Showing 8551 to 8574 of 8575 messages
Chat Pages: 343  342  341  340  339  338  337  336  335  334  333  332  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
16/10/2020
15:27
i think the sector of the market they are in are holding them back. Would be far better off in industrial engineering or (renewables)
ianst99
16/10/2020
14:08
Don't think that's true some invested at IPO at 130p sold out above 160p and shares have hit 195p. I think the business is worth considerably more than what it was 3-years back, more products, better market conditions, more experienced management. Long term play for offshore renewables.
1tommyt
16/10/2020
10:38
Since listing the share price has been in decline.This is very disappointing considering the prospects in a growing market.
imperial3
16/10/2020
10:26
The spread varies a great deal Leeds. Put me off initially but often 2p or less
gswredland
16/10/2020
10:09
I remember the same situation with VLX when I first purchased them 18 months ago, they dropped because of a seller. I am now 144% up now with them . I don't know what it is with my timing when buying shares though, I always seem to make hard work of it. This is a similar picks and shovels type of company, but are in different sectors that hopefully these will go the same way as VLX over the next 18 months.
igoe104
16/10/2020
09:45
Spread here is ridiculous
leedslad001
16/10/2020
09:35
I don't think it's someone who knows something, but more likely someone who fears something. The big question mark is the timing of deliveries. If you have a longer investment time frame, this is relatively irrelevant to you; but if you are concerned that it might get slower before it gets faster you could try to trade it. It's a risky trade however, when the share price is so low.
thomshrike
16/10/2020
08:51
All very puzzling this decline in the share price.Is there a nasty lurking which we do not know about yet?
imperial3
16/10/2020
08:47
There isn't any obvious reason for whats happening but someone definitely wants out. Either they bottom here or something is seriously wrong IMO.
spooky
16/10/2020
08:44
Mr Market not happy - If trend continues during day likely to break one year low - Now what does the market know? But Schroders have been adding Does not compute Why?
pugugly
16/10/2020
08:39
Down over 7%, have a missed something? Or is the seller back again. Anyone have a idea who the seller is ?
igoe104
16/10/2020
08:12
On their morning email, the broker talks about a confident message from the new CEO, who addressed a number of topics: still some uncertainty about the timing of the delivery of some projects; supply chain left still with some level of inefficiency but being sorted out; potential LT margin increase through a better integration of all divisions (apparently a clear focus going forward); conviction that the SI cost overrun on 4Q of FY20 was a one-off.
thomshrike
15/10/2020
13:46
Anyone got any views from the conference?
1tommyt
15/10/2020
08:00
The comment is about internal operations and efficiencies is widely expected. The business is currently composed of a handful of holding companies, many of them resulting of acquisitions, that should be integrated more efficiently. This is one of the things that James probably believed he had no experience (or patience) in doing when he decided to leave.
thomshrike
15/10/2020
07:46
Ally said "outlook for the business, in which I remain extremely confident."I don't think James leaving was a conspiracy, he did it for 12 years (private, PE & PLC) from founding, businesses naturally outgrow the founding members. If you look him up, he is a wealthy young man with his first kid and just started a new fund. Julian as chair is also good as he is a big player in offshore renewables. Some people were a little aprhensive of Ally being more oil and gas. However, I think all the industry market contacts are broadly the same today. Shame no actually update on numbers maybe get some more from the conference today.
1tommyt
15/10/2020
07:26
CEO confirmed: https://www.investegate.co.uk/tekmar-group-plc--tgp-/rns/appointment-of-new-ceo-and-board-changes/202010150700041306C/ Probably the expected result and the best. Internal review in progress. If that produces big changes it would be a clue as to why J R-B left. Maybe.
jonwig
13/10/2020
11:48
That MAY be the end of the seller.
spooky
11/10/2020
11:26
News next week of a new CEO?
imperial3
11/10/2020
10:53
And kick start the share price.
imperial3
11/10/2020
10:52
All this shows there is a bright future for the company.
imperial3
11/10/2020
09:19
USA NEWS. https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=newssearch&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwi--veAjazsAhUBnVwKHUPYAfsQxfQBCDAwAA&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wbur.org%2Fearthwhile%2F2020%2F09%2F23%2Felection-politics-offshore-wind-new-england&usg=AOvVaw0LAo1Jj9AaJzzU30QXmyT2
igoe104
11/10/2020
09:16
Boris Johnson used his keynote speech at the (virtual) Conservative Party conference today to announce that offshore wind will power “every home in the country” by 2030. It’s part of a “green industrial revolution” that will apparently create “hundreds of thousands, if not millions of jobs” while helping the UK hit its target of net zero carbon emissions by 2050. Is this news? Not entirely. Some targets announced today are new, like the plan to generate 1GW of energy from floating wind farms (turbines mounted on floating platforms can be used in deeper water). The pledge to increase the UK’s total offshore wind capacity from 30 to 40GW was included in the 2019 Conservative Party manifesto and later confirmed in the Queen’s Speech. So today’s speech confirms a pledge already made, but it comes at a time when the coronavirus pandemic has put other long-term spending projects in doubt. Is the 40GW target feasible? Analysts say reaching that kind of capacity in ten years will require tens of billions of investment, and the government has only announced £160m of extra spending today. That sum is relatively small, certainly compared to state-funded infrastructure projects like roads, in which the government says it plans to plough £27bn. But the government has made it clear it expects most offshore wind investment to come from the private sector, backed by a risk-sharing scheme called Contracts for Difference. The Global Wind Energy Council says the UK target of 40GW is “ambitiousR21; but confirms that this country is still the world market leader for offshore wind, calling it a “monumental success story for the UK”. The trade association says other countries like Poland are copying the UK’s Contracts for Difference funding model. So how much is the government really spending? Contracts for Difference is the main way the UK supports low carbon electricity industry. The government agrees to pay electricity generators a fixed price over 15 years, instead of the wholesale electricity prices set by the open market. It’s a way of ensuring companies with high upfront costs can invest in new technology with a guaranteed future income. It should also mean consumers won’t suddenly see their fuel bills rise if market prices rise higher than the price agreed with the government. But of course, if the market price for electricity turns out to be lower than the price fixed in advance by the government, the government tops up the companies’ revenue. The government said today that the UK will double its capacity for state-backed Contracts for Difference. This obviously means it’s possible that the government could be on the hook for more than the £160m of spending announced today, depending on what happens to electricity prices. Other experts have predicted that market prices could go so low that electricity suppliers end up paying the government via this scheme – a potential situation dubbed “negative subsidy”. A spokesman for the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) told FactCheck that prices agreed between government and suppliers have fallen by around two-thirds since 2015. He added: “The cost of deploying 40GW of offshore wind by 2030 will of course depend on the extent of further price reductions in the offshore wind sector. “A more ambitious deployment of offshore wind could increase the costs of the CfD scheme, but because offshore wind projects can also sell electricity to the market at lower prices reducing overall electricity prices, any net impact on consumer bills will be significantly smaller.” How many jobs will be created? The Prime Minister referred to the potential for “millions̶1; of jobs to be created in Britain as part of a broader push for more green energy, but it’s not yet clear how big a role offshore wind will play in this. The government says today’s announcement will create 2,000 construction jobs and “enable the sector to support up to 60,000 jobs directly and indirectly by 2030 in ports, factories and the supply chains”. Historically, renewable energy has failed to boost jobs in British manufacturing because firms tend to use cheaper overseas companies to make the equipment. The Mail quotes an unnamed source as saying that the government will impose rules on UK manufacturers so that 60 per cent of offshore wind equipment is made in Britain, but we haven’t seen any assurances given on the record about this. A BEIS spokesman told us: “Many offshore wind components are large, and need to be made relatively close to their deployment locations. “The UK has a strong manufacturing heritage, and by creating new large scale portside manufacturing hubs, the new funding will make the UK sector ever more competitive – helping it play a full role in the delivery of 40GW by 2030, and creating and retaining high quality jobs here in the UK.” Patrick Worrall and Simon Roach
igoe104
11/10/2020
09:14
Floating wind farm coming to French seas in 2022 A new floating wind farm in the French Mediterranean is one of many planned in French seas by 2030. Experts say the technology has “infinite potential”. FacebookTwitterEmailMore 8 October 2020 The new floating wind farm will be installed 18km from the coast in Occitanie By Joanna York Energy company Total announced yesterday (October 7) that it is taking a 20% investment in an experimental, off shore windfarm project called EolMed. The wind farm will be installed 18km from the coast near Porte-la-Nouvelle (Aude, Occitanie), and will contain floating wind turbines that are 150 metres high, with blades 100 metres long. The 15-megawatt turbines are five times stronger that their on-land counterparts. Qair, a specialist in renewable energy that is running the project, hopes that by 2022 the three 10 megawatt engines will be operating thanks to the offshore farm. Floating turbines have ‘unlimited potential’ Paul de la Guérivière, director general of Ideol, which operates France’s only existing floating windfarm, told news source Le Figaro: “Floating wind turbines have almost unlimited potential along coastlines where the best and most stable winds are. Free of constraints that they have on land, offshore wind turbines can be placed out at sea, far from view, where there is less conflict with other professionals who use the sea for work.” Ecology agency l’Agence de la transition écologique (Ademe) says the size of the French coastline and the resources available mean France has the potential to build an industry that generates up to 160,000 megawatts of energy. This is more that the total capacity of French energy production using existing technology. However, Ademe predicts that France is more likely to initially build an offshore windfarm industry that produces 33,000 megawatts of energy - half of what is currently produced by nuclear energy. As France has a large coastline, it predicts that producing this much energy will use only 2% of the country’s seas. More offshore farms planned in France and globally Plans are in the pipeline for many more floating windfarms in French seas by 2030. The French government will launch a call for tenders at the end of 2020 or early 2021, for commercial offers to install a 250-megawatt floating windfarm off the south coast of Brittany. Additionally, two floating wind farms of a similar size are planned in the Mediterranean in 2021. Similar projects have also been launched in other locations around the world with good coastal access including Scotland, South Korea and California. Technology still being developed That being said, the floating turbines are not without some complications. It is impossible to fish near them as they are held down with cables and anchors. It also takes considerable technical expertise to install and maintain the turbines, especially if repairs need to be done in stormy conditions. Much depends on the stability of the floating devices they stand on. Vinvent Balès, director of French offshore operations for electricity company WPD, told Le Figaro: “In order to optimise their productivity, the wind turbines redirect their blades, which we call their pitch. We have to make sure they are as stable as possible so that they can keep the right pitch in spite of sea swells.” If the turbines cannot maintain the right pitch, they become less productive and less cost-effective. At the moment, Mr Balès says, the technology for floating devices is like “the wild west - there are many different technologies available”. However, France is a leader in this field. Of the four technologies currently in use globally, three are French. The existing French wind farm run by Ideol uses concrete floating devices, which have also been exported to Japan. Technology expensive to develop The expense of developing this new technology is also an issue. Calls for tender in France are being supported by government subsidies on repurchasing prices. It is hoped that this will support development in the green energy sector, with the European goal of carbon neutrality by 2050 in mind. Calls for tender have also been designed to support local economies, with criteria stipulating that a certain percentage of production must be done locally. In Brittany, €650million has been invested into local construction and assembly of wind turbines. Cédric Le Bousse, manager of offshore renewable energy for electricity provider EDF, told Le Figaro that, over time, costs should “go down thanks to the structure of the industry developing, technologies maturing and improvement in installation methods”. This should have an effect for consumers, who could end up purchasing the energy produced by the floating wind farms. In the medium term, the state predicts that energy produced by floating wind farms will cost the same as that produced by on-land wind farms. Related stories €1.1bn Franco-UK renewable energy project stalled by Brexit France to double n
igoe104
09/10/2020
17:16
They are in a market which is in the throes of considerable expansion for the foreseeable future.This is a good long term investment imo.
imperial3
Chat Pages: 343  342  341  340  339  338  337  336  335  334  333  332  Older
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