Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Techfinancials Inc LSE:TECH London Ordinary Share VGG870911077 ORD USD0.0005 (DI)
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 0.90 0.80 1.00 0.95 0.8375 0.95 50,000 08:00:17
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Software & Computer Services 6.1 -3.9 -5.1 - 1

Techfinancials Share Discussion Threads

Showing 11276 to 11295 of 11300 messages
Chat Pages: 452  451  450  449  448  447  446  445  444  443  442  441  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
13/12/2019
11:59
Santa hacker speaks to girl via smart camera. Man killed by Lexus car being remotely started.
skinny
11/12/2019
09:13
Hydrogen Energy: Rice University Launches Bold Climate Change Initiative with Shell. Hydrogène de France Announces the World's First Plant for Mass Production of High-Powered Fuel Cells (Over 1 MW).
skinny
11/12/2019
08:52
World's first fully electric commercial aircraft takes flight in Canada.
skinny
11/12/2019
07:50
https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/car-news/108615/new-cat-s-eye-pollution-filters-can-clean-roadside-air?
mrphil
10/12/2019
14:39
Green Hydrogen from Wyhlen: Authorities give the Green light.
skinny
10/12/2019
10:30
'Hackable' karaoke and walkie talkie toys found by Which?. Tesla Model 3 on Autopilot crashes into police car.
skinny
09/12/2019
14:39
Everfuel and Shell enter into strategic collaboration on a large scale hydrogen plant.
skinny
05/12/2019
15:52
htTps://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191015131444.htm httPs://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112800.htm htTps://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/09/190930114750.htm htTps://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/09/190926101331.htm htTps://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/08/190826132425.htm httPs://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/08/190820154247.htm hTtps://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190710103145.htm
freddie ferret
05/12/2019
13:42
Hydrogen Research Fuels New Solar Ideas for Green Energy.
skinny
04/12/2019
14:20
AI cameras to catch texting Australian drivers.
skinny
04/12/2019
13:53
Ballard Announces Order From Van Hool For 20 Fuel Cell Modules to Power Buses in Holland.
skinny
03/12/2019
10:19
Dave4545 has been ramping these stocks all his life
optmist
02/12/2019
10:15
http://www.dpaonthenet.net/article/175935/Lamborghini-and-MIT-patent-new-technology-for-supercapacitors.aspx
mrphil
02/12/2019
08:32
I wonder if cudmore/intheknow69 will pay a visit and apologise for posting his own totally false rumours on here and twitter that caused the price to spike to as high as 13p Now delisting and 1p bid !
dave4545
01/12/2019
09:52
May already have been posted but sugest maybe achieve chemical costs of $1 per kwh using sulfur - How a new class of startups are working to solve the grid storage puzzle Oct 10 2019 https://www.technologyreview.com/s/614467/how-a-new-class-of-startups-are-working-to-solve-the-grid-storage-puzzle/ See also Form in Boston start-ups – Nov 7 2019 https://www.americaninno.com/boston/50-on-fire/bostinnos-2019-50-on-fire/ by James Temple Oct 10, 2019 Here’s the problem: Solar panels and wind turbines are cheap, clean, reliable sources of electricity, right up until they’re not. The sun sets; the wind flags. They can’t power an electricity grid alone. Coal and natural-gas plants can fill in the gaps today. But as climate regulations shutter more of these carbon-spewing sources, there will eventually be days or even weeks each year when renewables won’t be enough to keep the lights on. Something else will need to step in. Form Energy is convinced that that something could be a battery. But it’d have to be a battery unlike any the world has seen. To be as cheap, reliable, and flexible as natural gas, such a battery system would have to cost less than $10 per kilowatt-hour. Today’s best grid batteries, large lithium-ion systems, cost hundreds of dollars per kilowatt-hour (precise estimates vary). It could take decades even for that price to drop below $100. It’s a huge leap. But Form’s founders think they could hit that target by developing big batteries that rely on extremely cheap, energy-dense materials. “We think we can get there,” says MIT professor Yet-Ming Chiang, cofounder and chief scientist at Form. “We think we can match technology to those requirements.” A low-cost, long-lasting form of energy storage that could be built anywhere would be about the closest thing to a silver bullet for cleaning up the power sector. It would make the most of the sharply declining costs of solar and wind, without many of the environmental, safety, or aesthetic problems raised by other ways of balancing out fluctuating renewables. The grid storage conundrum Form, based in Somerville, Massachusetts, seized the attention of the battery world when it was created in 2017. Chiang is one of the world’s top battery scientists. He’s published hundreds of scientific papers, holds more than 80 patents, and has cofounded six startups. Several have earned valuations of more than $1 billion, including A123 Systems, which makes lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles. Form’s CEO, Mateo Jaramillo, previously assembled and led a business unit of Tesla that sells battery systems for homes and is now building some of the largest grid battery projects around the world. To date, Form has raised around $50 million from Bill Gates’s Breakthrough Energy Ventures, Italian energy giant Eni, and others. A wave of earlier grid storage companies failed (See “Why bad things happen to clean-energy startups”). Form is just one of several that have recently raised funds to take a fresh crack at the problem. The main storage need on the grid today is known as “intraday storage.” It provides quick bursts of electricity for a few hours to smooth out mismatches between generation and demand throughout the day and at least into the early evening. A growing amount of that storage comes from lithium-ion batteries, which also power phones, laptops, and electric cars and are steadily getting cheaper and more powerful. The amount of grid energy storage installed globally rose almost 150% last year to six gigawatt-hours, according to research firm Wood Mackenzie. That's nearly double the average rate during the preceding five years, and lithium-ion systems accounted for most of the increase. Tesla, for instance, plans to build hundreds of its new three-megawatt-hour Megapack battery systems in Moss Landing, California. The project, which includes other energy storage developers as well, would replace a trio of decades-old gas plants at the site run by Calpine, a large American power company. Telsa's grid battery plant in Kauaʻi, Hawaii. Courtesy: Tesla Meanwhile, a growing number of renewables developers, like Recurrent Energy and First Solar, are proposing giant solar farms coupled with huge battery storage systems, enabling the plants to continue delivering electricity for hours after sunset. But the sun and wind don’t just fade for hours; sometimes they dip for days or weeks. If we want to shift mainly to renewables, we’re going to need a lot more storage that can last a lot longer. With today’s battery technology, the costs would skyrocket, says Jesse Jenkins, an assistant professor at Princeton who researches energy systems. It would require banks upon banks of lithium-ion batteries, many of which might be used only a few times a year. We’d also need to build more solar and wind farms to generate enough surplus electricity to charge them. (See “The $2.5 trillion reason we can’t rely on batteries to clean up the grid.”) The economics crumble in this scenario. “If these assets are supposed to lie idle for three-quarters of the year, you’ve just jacked up the effective cost by 4X,” says Don Sadoway, an MIT chemist who cofounded Ambri, which has developed a liquid-metal grid battery that lasts about an hour longer than lithium-ion ones. But it’s actually even worse. We’d need to overbuild renewables and storage to meet demand during the rarest events: the prolonged ebbs in sun or wind that happen every few years, maybe even once a decade. Regions don’t have to solve this problem entirely through storage. Meeting just a small share of total demand through other means would ease the cost targets that storage companies would need to reach, other research shows. That could include nuclear reactors, hydroelectric power, natural-gas plants with systems that capture carbon emissions, or long-distance transmission lines that can balance out renewables across time zones. But those options are politically unpopular, expensive, geographically constrained, or all three. Batteries have the advantage of not particularly bugging people. We need to think about these future problems today because the necessary technologies could take years if not decades to develop. Areas with large shares of renewables, like California and Germany, already produce more solar or wind power than the grid can use during certain periods, undermining the economic incentives to build more. Many more regions are beginning to realize there’s a yawning gap that some technology will need to close if they hope to eliminate fossil fuels. Form’s approach Developing cheap, long-duration batteries has stumped researchers for decades, mainly because the metals and chemicals that have worked best so far are expensive. Using them to meet longer storage needs means stacking up more and more of them. Form is guarded about its how it’s trying to sidestep these challenges, but part of the company’s approach is clear from a paper Chiang and colleagues published in the journal Joule in late 2017 (see “Serial battery entrepreneur’s new venture tackles clean energy’s biggest problem”). Form Energy Form Energy was created in 2017, when MIT spinout Baseload Renewables merged with Verse Energy, which was started by Mateo Jaramillo, who previously led Tesla’s energy storage business. The company has raised around $50 million to date. Founders Mateo Jaramillo, Tesla Yet-Ming Chiang, MIT, 24M, A123 Marco Ferrara, IHI Inc., 24M Billy Woodford, 24M Ted Wiley, Aquion Energy Funders Breakthrough Energy Ventures Eni Group Prelude Ventures Macquarie Capital MIT’s The Engine Saudi Aramco The Department of Energy’s ARPA-E program All batteries contain two basic components: an electrolyte, usually a liquid chemical, and a pair of electrodes, the anode and the cathode, which are made of different materials (often, though not always, metals). Charged atoms, known as ions, carry current through the electrolyte between the two electrodes as the battery charges or discharges. In lithium-ion batteries, the electrolyte is some compound of lithium mixed with other chemicals. In the 2017 paper, Chiang and his colleagues highlighted the potential of an “air-breathing aqueous sulfur flow battery.” A flow battery starts to get around the cost problem by separating the electricity-delivering components of the battery, including the electrodes, from the energy storage part, the electrolyte. A standard flow battery has two different electrolytes, known as the catholyte and the anolyte, each of which can be stored in big, easily swapped tanks. So if you want more storage, you can just add larger tanks while those other pricey parts, including the electrodes, remain the same. To make it really inexpensive, though, the electrolytes filling those giant tanks need to be cheap as well. The key to the flow battery in the Joule paper is to use a sulfur-based solution as the anolyte. Sulfur is among the most abundant elements in the earth’s crust as well as a by-product of fuel refining, so it’s extremely cheap and can store a lot of energy. “Based on the charge stored per dollar, sulfur was more than a factor of 10 better than the next best thing,” Chiang told me in 2017. Altogether, the chemical costs in such a flow battery could be as low as $1 per kilowatt-hour, according to the study. When I spoke to Chiang last August, he confirmed that sulfur “is definitely still part of our road map.” He said it’s the approach they’re using in a project funded by the Department of Energy’s moonshot ARPA-E program. But Form says it’s now developing “multiple chemistries,” though it won’t say what the others are.
pugugly
29/11/2019
09:08
The EU can use hydrogen to stop climate change and create jobs.
skinny
28/11/2019
11:23
New study looks to biological enzymes as source of hydrogen fuel.
skinny
28/11/2019
09:41
Zero emission to Frankfurt: Driving in the Toyota Mirai.
skinny
27/11/2019
14:26
VTT Solves the Challenges of Zero Emission Hydrogen Technology using a Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.
skinny
27/11/2019
12:01
Russian cows get VR headsets 'to reduce anxiety'.
skinny
Chat Pages: 452  451  450  449  448  447  446  445  444  443  442  441  Older
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