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SHEL Shell Plc

2,937.00
80.00 (2.80%)
12 Apr 2024 - Closed
Delayed by 15 minutes
Share Name Share Symbol Market Stock Type
Shell Plc SHEL London Ordinary Share
  Price Change Price Change % Share Price Last Trade
80.00 2.80% 2,937.00 16:35:01
Open Price Low Price High Price Close Price Previous Close
2,882.50 2,882.50 2,952.00 2,937.00 2,857.00
more quote information »
Industry Sector
OIL & GAS PRODUCERS

Shell SHEL Dividends History

Announcement Date Type Currency Dividend Amount Ex Date Record Date Payment Date
27/10/2022InterimGBP0.263116/11/202317/11/202320/12/2023
27/10/2022InterimGBP0.261210/08/202311/08/202318/09/2023
27/10/2022InterimGBP0.229918/05/202319/05/202326/06/2023
27/10/2022InterimGBP0.241116/02/202317/02/202327/03/2023
28/10/2021InterimGBP0.206110/11/202211/11/202219/12/2022
28/10/2021InterimGBP0.215711/08/202212/08/202220/09/2022
28/10/2021InterimGBP0.200119/05/202220/05/202227/06/2022
28/10/2021InterimUSD0.2417/02/202218/02/202228/03/2022

Top Dividend Posts

Top Posts
Posted at 01/2/2024 08:07 by xxxxxy
Shell profits dropped by nearly a third as the energy giant adjusted to lower oil and gas prices.Shell revealed adjusted earnings of $28.3bn (£22.3bn) for 2023, down 29pc from the record $39.9bn (£32.2bn) recorded in the wake of the energy shock triggered by Russia's invasion of Ukraine.It comes as Brent crude oil has fallen by 37pc since hitting $127 a barrel in March last year following Vladimir Putin's decision to invade Ukraine. Wholesale gas prices have plummeted 90pc since the shock to energy markets.However, Shell also revealed that for the fourth quarter it increased adjusted profits by 17pc to $6.3bn (£5bn) as Greenpeach activists held a "profit party" outside its headquarters in London.The energy giant also announced a new $3.5bn share buyback for the upcoming quarter, matching the level of the previous three months.Chief executive Wael Sawan said: "Shell delivered another quarter of strong performance, concluding a year in which we made good progress across the targets outlined at our capital markets day."As we enter 2024 we are continuing to simplify our organisation with a focus on delivering more value with less emissions."In 2023, Shell returned $23bn to shareholders. In line with our progressive dividend policy, Shell is now increasing its dividend by 4pc. We are also commencing a $3.5bn buyback programme for the next three months.... Daily Telegraph
Posted at 09/1/2024 11:12 by xxxxxy
Shell plc's SHEL, subsidiary, Shell Petroleum Development Co. of Nigeria Ltd. ("SPDC"), achieved a significant legal victory as Nigeria's Supreme Court upheld its appeal in a pollution case. This decision, issued in 2022, has far-reaching implications, especially since it's believed to pave the way for the sale of assets (worth billions of dollars) in the country.Understanding the Legal LandscapeSPDC, holding a 30% stake in a joint venture in Nigeria, faced a major hurdle with a court order preventing the divestment of assets until the pollution case's resolution. This obstacle not only halted Shell's parent company from disposing of onshore oil operations but also underscored the complexities of operating in a region marred by legal challenges.The VerdictWhile the details of the court's judgment are awaited, insiders revealed the initial verbal announcement made on Friday. This information, provided by individuals preferring anonymity, hinted at the positive turn of events for SHEL. This legal victory is not just an achievement for the company but also a strategic move that potentially reshapes its future in Nigeria.SPDC's Response and Ongoing EvaluationIn response to inquiries, a spokesperson for SPDC commented, "We note the Supreme Court's judgment on SPDC's appeal," emphasizing the ongoing evaluation of the decision's implications. This cautious response showcases the company's awareness of the significance of the verdict and its potential impact on its future operations.A Long-Standing Presence in NigeriaShell has been a key player in Nigeria's oil extraction sector for more than 50 years. The recent legal hurdle, which emerged approximately three years ago, prompted the then-CEO Ben van Beurden to signal the company's intent to exit onshore oil positions due to the ongoing issues of sabotage and theft. While the court's favorable decision provides SPDC with some relief, the journey is far from over.Legal Challenges on Multiple FrontsDespite this legal victory, Shell still faces challenges in various courts within Nigeria and the United Kingdom. A separate legal battle, involving approximately 1,200 plaintiffs in Nigeria's southwestern city of Akure, revolves around claims of being affected by an oil spill in 2011. Simultaneously, in the U.K., a court ruling permits a group of Nigerian fishermen to proceed with their claims against Shell in another longstanding legal case.Implications for the Oil and Gas IndustryThis legal saga highlights the intricacies and challenges that multinational corporations face in regions with complex legal landscapes. The outcome of these cases could set precedents for how other companies navigate legal hurdles in the pursuit of their business goals.ConclusionAs Shell emerges victorious in this significant legal battle, the broader implications for the oil and gas industry remain to be seen. The Shell subsidiary's ability to navigate these legal challenges will undoubtedly shape its future strategies in Nigeria and abroad. The Supreme Court's decision is just a chapter in Shell's ongoing narrative, and the industry watches closely as the story unfolds.Zacks Rank and Key PicksCurrently, SHEL carries a Zacks Rank #3 (Hold).... Yahoo Finance
Posted at 14/12/2023 09:02 by geckotheglorious
Shell is underperforming relative to its US peers for a reason.

It's worse run, it slashed its dividend(and hasnt since raised it back to prior levels) whereas the US majors maintained theirs, Reserves are lower at Shell, and the Production picture for Exxon/Chevron is far rosier than for Shell(or BP for that matter)

I wouldnt touch Shell with a bargepole anymore.
Posted at 13/12/2023 20:39 by pj84
"Shell

It seems that the main reason to buy Shell (GB:SHEL) remains its cheap valuation, especially compared with its US peers.

Invesco Comstock managers Kevin Holt, James Warwick and Devin Armstong are the latest top-performing investors to have seized upon the shares’ low rating, buying into the oil giant in August.

‘Shell has underperformed recently, which allowed us to initiate a position in this top-tier oil and gas firm,’ they said in their latest update to investors.

They are three of 55 Elite Investors backing in the shares, resulting in Shell’s status as the top London-listed stock in the Citywire Elite Companies rankings.

Jon Bosse and Jujhar Sohi, who own Shell in their Nuveen Large Cap Value and Multi Cap Value funds, said the shares were ‘exceptionally undervalued’, adding that chief executive Wael Sawan was ‘driving positive change and a commitment to shareholder returns’ in an update to their investors.

These shareholder returns are in the form of growing dividend and share buybacks, with Shell’s investment strictly controlled to generate plenty of cash flow.

Oil and gas and production and trading profits are under pressure from an oil price which has been drifting lower since the summer. However, over the medium term, Shell should benefit from being one of the leading integrated liquified natural gas (LNG) players as gas remains a key transition fuel for countries aiming to reduce their carbon dioxide emissions.

With Shell shares trading on just 7.5 times forecast earnings for the next 12 months, it’s not hard to to see why management is growing buybacks.

Shell’s top Elite Investors
Elite Investor Fund Size in fund Rank in fund
Steven Magill UBS UK Equity Income Fund 8.3% 2/36
Martin Walker Invesco UK Equity 6.7% 2/36
Oliver Kelton WS Ardtur Continental European Fund 6.5% 3/24
Sources: Citywire / Morningstar, latest holdings data."
Posted at 11/12/2023 07:05 by garycook
SHELL PLC THIRD QUARTER 2023 EURO AND GBP EQUIVALENT DIVID PAYMENTS

December 11, 2023

The Board of Shell plc today announced the pounds sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments in respect of the third quarter 2023 interim dividend, which was announced on November 2, 2023 at US$0.331 per ordinary share.

Shareholders have been able to elect to receive their dividends in US dollars, euros or pounds sterling. Holders of ordinary shares who have validly submitted US dollars, euros or pounds sterling currency elections by December 1, 2023 will be entitled to a dividend of US$0.331, EUR0.3070 or 26.31p per ordinary share, respectively.

Absent any valid election to the contrary, persons holding their ordinary shares through Euroclear Nederland will receive their dividends in euros at the euro rate per ordinary share shown above. Absent any valid election to the contrary, shareholders (both holding in certificated and uncertificated form (CREST members)) and persons holding their shares through the Shell Corporate Nominee will receive their dividends in pounds sterling, at the pound sterling rate per ordinary share shown above.

Euro and pounds sterling dividends payable in cash have been converted from US dollars based on an average of market exchange rates over the three dealing days from December 6 to December 8, 2023. This dividend will be payable on December 20, 2023 to those members whose names were on the Register of Members on November 17, 2023.
Posted at 04/9/2023 08:38 by spud
Shell plc Shell Plc Second Quarter 2023 Euro And Gbp Equivalent Dividend PaymentsSource: UK Regulatory (RNS & others) TIDMSHELL SHELL PLC SECOND QUARTER 2023 EURO AND GBP EQUIVALENT DIVID PAYMENTSSeptember 4, 2023The Board of Shell plc today announced the pounds sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments in respect of the second quarter 2023 interim dividend, which was announced on July 27, 2023 at US$0.331 per ordinary share.Shareholders have been able to elect to receive their dividends in US dollars, euros or pounds sterling. Holders of ordinary shares who have validly submitted US dollars, euros or pounds sterling currency elections by August 25, 2023 will be entitled to a dividend of US$0.331, EUR0.3046 or 26.12p per ordinary share, respectively.spud
Posted at 14/6/2023 07:45 by adrian j boris
Shell Boosts Dividend 15% as It Pivots Back Toward Oil and Gas

William Mathis, Bloomberg News

The oil and gas business drives the majority of Shell’s profits.



(Bloomberg) -- Shell Plc will increase its dividend 15% and boost natural gas production as new Chief Executive Officer Wael Sawan refocuses on the fossil fuels that drove record profits last year.

It’s part of a pivot by the European oil major to expand the most profitable parts of its business, even if they are carbon intensive, while scaling back ventures that don’t make high enough returns. The company reiterated its pledge to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050.

“We will invest in the models that work — those with the highest returns that play to our strengths,” Sawan said in a statement. The CEO and his management team will lay out more details of the plan to shareholders at a presentation in New York later on Wednesday.

As well as the dividend increase, which will take effect this quarter, Shell committed buying back at least $5 billion of shares in the second half. The company will reduce capital spending to $22 billion to $25 billion a year for 2024 and 2025.

Key to achieving higher returns will be the oil and gas business that drives the majority of Shell’s profits. The company will no longer seek to cut oil production by 1% to 2% annually, having achieved its initial output-reduction plan — announced in 2021 amid a focus on cutting carbon emissions — faster than anticipated.

Shell will now seek to grow its integrated gas business and will stabilize oil output to 2030.
Posted at 08/6/2023 14:17 by jrphoenixw2
Questor column@Telegraph today:
'Commodity stocks such as this oil giant could be a useful hedge against inflation
Questor share tip: it is rare for oil demand to drop, even during recessions, and the company's shares look cheap.

This column makes no apology for returning to the subject of Shell so quickly after its last look a month ago. That came after May’s bumper first-quarter profits statement and the occasion this time is last weekend’s Opec+ meeting in Vienna.

Saudi Arabia’s attempts to bend the oil price to its iron may not be proving entirely successful, but there are still good grounds for thinking the oil price is well underpinned in the $70 to $80 a barrel range, enough for Shell to keep churning out dividends and share buybacks to income-seeking investors (even if climate campaigners and portfolio builders who run strict environmental, social and governance screens may despair).



The influence of Opec+ is not as great as investors might believe, given that the members of the oil producers’ cartel and its allies, such as Russia, control less than half of global oil production between them.

This may explain why oil traders are hardly running for cover even as Riyadh sanctions a cut in production of one million barrels of oil a day, or 1pc of global output, from July 1 and gets Opec+ to extend the 1.2m barrel a day cut announced in April into 2024.

Reports of dissatisfaction among other Opec members who are itching to increase output, notably Nigeria and Angola, may also be dampening the impact of the Saudi Arabian initiative.

An even bigger issue facing the oil price may be ongoing concerns over the possibility of a global recession, or at least a slowdown.

In this context it is intriguing to note that equity markets seem content to price in a so-called “soft landing” or even no recession at all, so either share buyers or oil traders are going to be wrong at some stage.

And if it is oil traders who are wrong, then heaven help them for two reasons.

First, oil demand could come in higher than expected. Second, traders have reportedly been building up short positions against crude, so if the price starts to go against them, they may need to buy oil to close out and that could give the commodity’s price a lift.

Once sentiment is so one-sided, it does not take much to get the price going in the other direction and while it is very hard for investors to gauge – other than by wading through the data provided by America’s Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) commitment of traders’ reports – the impact of traders’ positioning (and who is net long and net short) should never be underestimated.

The fundamentals for oil may not be as bad as the market seems to think.

It is rare for oil demand to drop, even during recessions, and whether we like it or not, hydrocarbons are likely to be a major source of energy for some time to come, as we seek to manage the transition towards a more renewable future and net zero by 2050.

It may therefore be unwise to underestimate demand, especially as the US has run down its strategic petroleum reserve to just 355m barrels, the lowest mark since 1983 and way below its 714m-barrel capacity.

----------------------------------------
Shell key facts
Market value: £152bn
Turnover: (Dec 23E): $343bn
Pre-tax profits: (Dec 23E): $47.8bn
Yield: (Dec 23E): 4.2pc
Most recent year’s dividend: (Dec 22): 86p
Net debt: (March 23): $81.8bn
Return on capital: (Dec 23): 24.6pc
Cash conversion ratio: (Dec 23): 68pc
p/e ratio: (Dec 23E): 6.5
----------------------------------------
For reasons of energy independence and national security it seems likely that the US will have to top up again at some stage.

However, growth in shale oil production in the US appears to be flattening out, especially in the key Permian basin, according to the Energy Information Administration, data that may inform the International Energy Agency’s forecasts that global hydrocarbon supply may grow more slowly than demand in 2023 (and demand is actually seen hitting a new all-time high).

Data from Baker Hughes show that active rig numbers in the US are down by more than 10pc from 2022’s highs, at 696, while the worldwide drop is 8pc to 1,783, compared with February’s high of 1,921. If demand keeps rising, there is a risk that there is not enough supply to meet that demand.

The result could in turn be sharp oil price increases, the last thing that traders seem to expect, although any such spike could lead to the demand destruction (and decisive action to secure new energy sources) that environmental campaigners crave, even if the price could be inflation.

Central banks can print money, but they cannot print oil when it is needed.

Meanwhile, consensus analysts’ forecasts of a drop in after-tax income at Shell in 2023, 2024 and 2025, suggest expectations are low. The shares also look cheap on a dividend yield of more than 4pc, a price-to-earnings ratio of less than seven and relative to £155bn in net assets.

Commodity stocks such as Shell could yet be a useful hedge against a sustained bout of inflation.

Questor says: Hold
Ticker: SHEL
Share price at close: £22.94
Russ Mould is investment director at AJ Bell, the stockbroker
Posted at 10/5/2023 17:37 by jrphoenixw2
Telelgraph/Questor today:
----------------
'Painful for some to admit it, but this stock remains an income staple

Questor share tip: investors prioritising dollars and cents will be pleased to see this giant pumping out cash
----------------


The bumper first-quarter profits published by Shell last week will upset environmental campaigners and many householders alike, especially those who are finding it hard to pay their bills or keep their car topped up.

Even global tax payments of $5.6bn (£4.5bn) in the first three months of the year – $2.1bn more than in the equivalent period in 2022 – may not assuage their fury.

But those investors who desire reliable income and are prepared to focus purely on dollars and cents, nickels and dimes rather than debate environmental, social or governance (ESG) issues, will be pleased to see the oil and gas giant pumping out cash.

Shell handed over $6.3bn via buybacks and dividends in the first quarter alone and annualising that equates to £20bn, or a cash yield in the double-digit percentage range.

That is probably the key number right now because Shell’s earnings do take some studying.

On the face of it, the business model of an oil major is easy enough to understand.

They explore and drill for and then produce hydrocarbons; they ship and refine them; they trade them; and they sell refined product at petrol stations or end-products like chemicals. Simple.

Quantifying how well they do this is a different matter and besides statutory measures such as pre-tax or net (after-tax) income, Shell also refers to earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (Ebitda), adjusted Ebitda, adjusted earnings and earnings on a CCS (current cost of supply) basis, which excludes the effect of changes in the oil price.

To quote Ed Murrow, the American broadcaster: “Anyone who isn’t confused really doesn’t understand the situation.”



To cut through all of that, it may be simplest to look at net, or after-tax, income. In the first quarter, Shell reported net profit of $8.7bn, compared with $7.1bn a year ago.

That increase may seem odd, bearing in mind the average prices received by Shell for its oil and natural gas fell by a fifth and two fifths respectively from the first quarter of 2022 to the first quarter of this year.

But Shell booked a $3.9bn writedown on its Russian assets in the first quarter of last year, so profits were down this time compared with a year ago once that is taken into account, thanks to lower hydrocarbon prices, no great change in output and higher taxes.

That meaty net profit figure more than covers the dividend, which equates to a 3.9pc forward dividend yield, according to analysts’ consensus estimates, and the buyback.

As such, it forms the main plank of any investment case for the stock, even if any portfolio-builder who runs strict ESG screens is likely to be unmoved and stick to their own personal principles, especially if they believe oil firms to be profiteering.

The sheer scale of the net profit number inevitably raises that issue.

This column, however, views commodity producers as price takers rather than price givers, by the very nature of their business – a commodity comes with little or no differentiation, by definition, so the supplier’s key tools to attract buyers are efficiency of production and price.

And there are so many influences on the oil price, ranging from global economic growth to geopolitics and sanctions, environmental pressures, the role of Opec and more.

---------
Shell key facts
Market value: £162bn
Last full-year dividend (Dec 22): 86p
Yield (Dec 23E): 3.9pc
Turnover (Dec 23E): $346bn
Pre-tax profit (Dec 23E): $46.1bn
Net debt (Mar 23): $81.8bn
Return on capital (Dec 23): 24.6pc
Cash conversion (Dec 23): 68pc
PE ratio (Dec 23E): 7.0x
---------

Shell probably has more influence on price for refined products, especially those for sale on petrol station forecourts, although drivers will do their best to shop around.

The company’s acknowledgement that trading of crude oil, refined products and petrochemicals contributed strongly to first-quarter earnings is harder to defend against profiteering claims, and campaigners will be pleased, in this context, to see the increased tax charge.

The debate is unlikely to die down and may only recede if oil and gas prices go lower and drag Shell’s earnings with them.

That remains a key risk to the share price and any falls here could offset the benefits of the income, if an investor is obliged to sell the paper at an inopportune moment and has to crystallise any losses.

Fears of a recession leave Brent crude back near $70 a barrel, so the effect of Opec’s April production cut is proving short-lived (to perhaps show how hard it is to profiteer and bend a global market like oil to anyone’s will).

But analysts are already forecasting decreases in net income in 2023, 2024 and 2025, so this is hardly news. The shares look cheap on yield and relative to the company’s £155bn in net assets, while a forward price-earnings ratio of seven looks undemanding. Shell remains an income staple.

Questor says: hold
Ticker: SHEL
Share price at close: £23.76
Posted at 05/12/2022 13:23 by waldron
SHELL PLC THIRD QUARTER 2022 EURO AND GBP EQUIVALENT DIVID PAYMENTS

December 5, 2022

The Board of Shell plc ("Shell") today announced the pounds sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments in respect of the third quarter 2022 interim dividend, which was announced on October 27, 2022 at US$0.25 per ordinary share.

Shareholders have been able to elect to receive their dividends in US dollars, euros or pounds sterling. Holders of ordinary shares who have validly submitted US dollars, euros or pounds sterling currency elections by November 25, 2022 will be entitled to a dividend of US$0.25, EUR0.2398 or 20.61p per ordinary share, respectively.

Absent any valid election to the contrary, persons holding their ordinary shares through Euroclear Nederland will receive their dividends in euros at the euro rate per ordinary share shown above. Absent any valid election to the contrary, shareholders (both holding in certificated and uncertificated form (CREST members)) and persons holding their shares through the Shell Corporate Nominee will receive their dividends in pounds sterling, at the pound sterling rate per ordinary share shown above.

Euro and pounds sterling dividends payable in cash have been converted from US dollars based on an average of market exchange rates over the three dealing days from November 30 to December 2, 2022. This dividend will be payable on December 19, 2022 to those members whose names were on the Register of Members on November 11, 2022.

Taxation - cash dividend

With Shell's tax residence moved to the UK, dividends paid to shareholders on their ordinary shares will not attract Dutch dividend withholding tax. This means that holders of the former A shares receive their dividends in full as Dutch dividend withholding tax is no longer withheld on these dividends. Holders of the former B shares receive their dividends directly from Shell as these dividends will no longer be paid through the Dividend Access Mechanism.

If you are uncertain as to the tax treatment of any dividends you should consult your tax advisor.

Note

A different currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies.

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