Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Severfield LSE:SFR London Ordinary Share GB00B27YGJ97 ORD 2.5P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +1.25p +1.80% 70.75p 70.50p 71.00p 72.75p 68.00p 68.00p 140,605 16:35:22
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Industrial Engineering 262.2 18.1 5.1 13.8 211.44

Severfield Share Discussion Threads

Showing 4926 to 4948 of 4950 messages
Chat Pages: 198  197  196  195  194  193  192  191  190  189  188  187  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
14/7/2017
11:44
Share price appears to have turned over last 48 hours. Finally. I think it's a bit of a battle back to 85 though.
cc2014
11/7/2017
11:29
Six months ago I was so optimistic about SFR, and eagerly awaited any announcements to be made by the company, feeling sure that would confirm my bullish expectations. Then the most recent update was almost all bullish, except for the order book--no small thing! Now, as the share price has fallen about 15%, real doubts creep in. We could do with more news. If this is a real problem it appears to have come out of the blue as there was not hint of it until the latest update.
jadeticl3
10/7/2017
20:10
Will be interesting to see the Biln. trading statement (normally out at end of July) to understand if the fall in orders is across the market or just a SFR problem. Could be a minor brexit/election stumble or something more fundamental within SFR. Securing only 60m of new work in 7 months to June, is not good for a company that eats up 260m pa. The sooner a trading statement comes out the better for the shareholders peace of mind.
steelwatch100
04/7/2017
10:43
I am interested to see what happens from here. Someone has been absorbing all the sells every day for a couple of weeks. Today for the first time the bid has popped up a bit and hasn't resulted in more selling (yet). I'm hopeful it will turn back up here and all the weak holders with little conviction are out the way
cc2014
03/7/2017
18:07
katie, Quite so; economists rarely get it right. bend1pa, I did NOT mean to say " nothing is certain in the future"; I meant what I did say. I don`t see a falling market as a threat, but as an opportunity to buy more of the companies i like.
roddiemac2
03/7/2017
16:07
Economist rarely get it right when it comes to big advent's like the 2008 crash, and Brexit is another one.
katie priceless
03/7/2017
15:14
'The future does not exist; it is unknowable, except in the most general terms: ie the human race will become so numerous that it will ,in all probability ,extinguish itself.' You do realise that sentence completely contradicts itself as well as being untrue? The present doesn't exist either if you want to go down that road. What you mean is that nothing is certain in the future (other than death and taxes) :-) AS far as Brit economy is concerned, there is barely an economist around who hasn't said that full Brexit will hit us hard in the short/medium term. I'm only interested in that period. I don't look too far ahead. The other thing is we've been in a long bull market now (over 8 years). Most bull markets historically last 5-6 years on average. So the elastic is being stretched and the next bear market probably can't be too far away. SFR will be hit with the rest of 'em when that happens.
bend1pa
03/7/2017
14:42
bend1pa, The future does not exist; it is unknowable, except in the most general terms: ie the human race will become so numerous that it will ,in all probability ,extinguish itself. Meanwhile, in more specific terms, the future for most people is to pay more to get less , and to queue up for the privilege. Growth on out into the future is impossible. jadetcl3 asks " how can we know that the future for SFR will be worse due to brexit?"---We can`t know. Historically, the construction industry has been one of the first to suffer in a recession,but we don`t know that brexit will cause a recession here , and, in any event, past experience is not necessarily a guide to future experience. SFR`s move into India has been ridiculed on this board , but , in time, I think the Indian JV could be bigger than the business here, but I can`t KNOW that. However, it is good to see a company try to invest for the long term. Similarly ,it is good to see that they are assessing the European market. I continue to hold SFR for the long term potential. I will add that I have held two shares extremely profitably for 15 years, whilst being aware that investors today are predominantly short term thinkers.
roddiemac2
03/7/2017
10:27
Not long before the Brexit vote last June I saw an interview with an expert representing a panel of experts who had been asked to answer the question "what will the impact of Brexit be, and would we not be better to stay with what we know". This man opened his conclusions from the panel with the words " can we just clear up one myth? Staying in the EU does not provide us with any more certainty than leaving. We just do not know what the EU will look like in 2 years time let alone 5 years time when we consider all that is happening now". This surprised me, but maybe that panel was right. If so how can we know that the future for SFR will be worse due to Brexit?
jadeticl3
03/7/2017
09:33
Lower pound and a U turn on austerity and World wide trade unfetted by the EU , all good for SFR
katie priceless
02/7/2017
20:15
roddiemac2 'What possible negative impact could there be from Brexit ?' Well SFR manufacture structural steel, so are dependent on the construction industry. Unless you are in denial the economic effects of Brexit could possibly hit the UK hard, maybe drive us back into recession. In fact GDP has slowed dramatically this first Qtr. Whenever recession looms the construction industry is one of the first to suffer, and SFR's order book is already well down on last year as fears of Brexit begin to bite. HTH?
bend1pa
02/7/2017
08:25
Http://www.gfk.com/insights/press-release/more-purchasing-power-in-austria-in-2017-same-for-switzerland-but-only-in-national-currency/
maywillow
01/7/2017
20:22
Close on 1.10 again.
alphorn
24/6/2017
17:04
The Swiss National Bank Owns $80 Billion in US Stocks—Here217;s the Catch Stock-Markets / Stock Market 2017 Jun 24, 2017 - 04:31 PM GMT By: John_Mauldin Stock-Markets Switzerland is a small country of just 8 million people, but they make an outsized impact on economics and finance and money. Because Switzerland is considered a safe haven and a well-run country, many people would like to hold large amounts of their assets in the Swiss franc. This makes the Swiss franc intolerably strong for Swiss businesses and citizens. So the Swiss National Bank (SNB) has to print a great deal of money and use nonconventional means to hold down the value of their currency. Their overnight repo rate is -0.75%. That’s right, they charge you a little less than 1% a year just for the pleasure of letting your cash sit in a Swiss bank deposit. Switzerland Is Buying US Stocks on an Enormous Scale And the SNB is buying massive quantities of dollars and euros, paid for by printing hundreds of billions in Swiss francs. The SNB owns about $80 billion in US stocks today (June, 2017) and a guesstimated $20 billion or so in European stocks (this guess comes from my friend Grant Williams, so I will go with it). They have bought roughly $17 billion worth of US stocks so far this year. And they have no formula; they are just trying to manage their currency. Think about this for a moment: They have about $10,000 in US stocks on their books for every man, woman, and child in Switzerland, not to mention who knows how much in other assorted assets, all in the effort to keep a lid on what is still one of the most expensive currencies in the world. Switzerland is now the eighth-largest public holder of US stocks. It has got to be one of the largest holders of Apple. What Happens When There Is a Bear Market? Who bears the losses? Print just more money to make up the difference on the balance sheet? Do we even care what the Swiss National Bank balance sheet looks like? More importantly, do they really care? We all remember European Central Bank President Mario Draghi’s famous remark, that he would do “whatever it takes” to defend the euro. We could hear the Swiss singing from the same hymnbook soon.
the grumpy old men
22/6/2017
23:23
Some decent sized trades going through as someone clearly off-loading. Price holding suggesting plenty of buyers out there around this 80-82 area. Seller can't have an infinite amount of shares so hoping they are nearly done.
cc2014
18/6/2017
18:09
Hi both. Good points all round. Just to be clear I have a equal holding in both CO's, but are now on balance favouring BILN for growth. Re remedial charges. My understanding was that all parties covered their own costs until the remedial works had been completed. After which liability would be agreed upon. This fits with the wording given i.e. Sfr's expenditure on replacing bolts are in line with the reserves made. However, other parties will have also incurred costs / charges. ( I would be spitting feathers if due to cheap imported bolts, 3 floors could not be let + pr disaster) counter claims against SFR must be on the table by now. I would love to hear the words that it has all been settled. Your right Rhomboid the auditors will have a duty to refer at least to it in the AR 2017 if it is now floating around and of a sizeable nature, we may just have to wait & see on this one! Europe. Still of the opinion this will be a hard nut to crack, the internal resistance in Europe to U.K. Fabricated steel coming in always has been and will continue to be great. Too many potential down sides. Plenty of areas within uk to go at, why not concentrate their resources on these? India. - stand corrected. Only an additional 5 m going across. Where and when have these loans come from & why were they paying 10% pa? If so expensive why have they not have paid them down sooner (they have access available funds in uk) How to much are they paying for the remainder of the loan? Oh well enough for now, beer time. Cheers
steelwatch100
17/6/2017
09:33
Hi Steelwatch100 It would be great to hear Ian Lawson is fully recovered and I'm sure we'll hear it in due course. Re cheesegrater the wording is " The remedial bolt replacement works at Leadenhall were completed during the year with the total expenditure being in line with the non-underlying charge made back in 2015. Discussions continue with all stakeholders to determine where the financial liability for the remedial costs should rest" that suggests to me there is potential cost recovery for SFR and there is nothing to suggest additional costs or damages. If there were such a possibility it would have to have been flagged by the auditors who would have been all over this issue for the last few years audits. Re Europe thy say; "After undertaking a significant amount of research into the potential market opportunity in Continental Europe we have employed a European business development director based in the Netherlands, who will focus on tailoring our established UK offering for expansion into this market." That suggests a careful low cost way of unlocking a market where they suddenly have a major cost advantage pre Brexit anyhow. I'd be concerned if they weren't looking . FWIW BILN are doing the same. It's also long been an aim for SFR from P40 of the last AR; "Evaluate opportunities within European markets which are showing ‘green shoots’ of improvement including assessment of the most appropriate European delivery model." On India the jV partners are jointly putting in 10m so SFR are putting in £5m "Overall, we remain confident in the long term development of the market and of the business and this has led to the agreement with our joint venture partner, JSW, to each invest additional equity of £5.3m to help repay the business's outstanding term debt. The Indian government continues to reshape the economy to stimulate investment and these structural changes will support the long term growth of the business." As a result "The immediate impact is expected to increase the Group's share of JSSL's profit by £0.5m per annum." so an immediate 10% ROCE which strikes me as a reasonable use of surplus cash. I hold more SFR than BILN but only because of liquidity & risk management. I've topped up BILN and see them as more attractive but both firms look well placed to deliver. Cheers
rhomboid
17/6/2017
09:32
Good post there steel. Agree BILN has more going for it at present though in this business you have to feel all boats rise with the tide.
meijiman
17/6/2017
06:02
Overall a good set of numbers issued this week. However, IMHO a few things that gives me cause for concern about SFR when comparing with BILN. 1. No news on CEO's return to work date. 2. A year after completion of the cheesegrator bolt remedial work, no further forward to settlement. Presumably gone legal with counter claims from developer for loss of rental (3 floors for 2years+) along with claims from the contractor & engineer. Could be a big additional figure if it goes against them + everyone's legal fees. The Cheesegrator legacy continues! 3. Not the right time to spend heavy trying to break into Europe. Nobody has managed this in the steelwork industry in the past 20 years, without getting a bloody nose! 4. Throwing a further 10m of shareholders cash into the Indian venture. Too much hope is now placed on this to generate future income. SFR has been 10 years now in India, it's been a distraction & a drain on the company's resources (financial & people). The strong move would have been to get out.
steelwatch100
15/6/2017
22:23
I think your partner is correct. Not only that but any good news (as has been the case since last June) will be nothing to do with Brexit, but it will not last.
jadeticl3
15/6/2017
19:25
bendIpa, What possible negative impact could there be from Brexit ? My partner is Dutch and says the English will blame everything that goes wrong from now on Brexit.
roddiemac2
15/6/2017
17:04
Switzerland’s ultra-loose monetary policy remains ‘absolutely necessary’, says SNB President The Swiss National Bank remains committed to its ultra-loose monetary policy, says President Thomas Jordan. Interest rates held below zero percent. The central bank will continue to intervene in foreign exchange markets where necessary. Karen Gilchrist | Carolin Roth 6 Hours AgoCNBC.com SNB's Jordan: Expansive monetary policy still necessary SNB's Jordan: Expansive monetary policy still necessary 7 Hours Ago | 01:10 The President of Switzerland's central bank has said that its ultra-loose monetary policy remains 'absolutely necessary' after it announced its commitment to keeping interest rates in negative territory on Thursday. At its quarterly policy update held in the Swiss capital Bern, the Swiss National Bank said that it would continue with its monetary policy expansion as part of continued efforts to tackle low inflation and negative output. The SNB's target range for three-month Swiss franc LIBOR was held at -1.25 percent to -0.25 percent, and its sight deposit rate was held at 0.75 percent. "We still have very low inflation – close to zero – we have a negative output gap and we still have a Swiss franc that is significantly overvalued," President Thomas Jordan told CNBC shortly after the announcement. The continued expansionary measures were largely anticipated by analysts, especially given the European Central Bank's (ECB) decision last week to hold interest rates at 0.0 percent. The SNB is dependent on ECB's pace of monetary policy and may look at normalizing its policy once President Mario Draghi decides to start rolling back the bank's asset purchase program. Though geopolitical risks across Europe have steadied somewhat over recent months after a raft of contentious elections, Jordan said that the bank would continue to intervene in foreign exchange markets where necessary to combat overvaluation of the Swiss franc, which is often seen by investors as something of a safe haven during times of geopolitical risk. Political situation has improved in Europe: SNB's Jordan Political situation has improved in Europe: SNB's Jordan 7 Hours Ago | 00:59 "It's true that the political situation improved in Europe; that will hopefully diminish the pressure on the Swiss franc to some extent. But we follow exactly the situation in the foreign exchange market, we look at the pressure, and then we decide what to do in foreign exchange interventions," said Jordan. The central bank has kept rates frozen since it abandoned its cap on the franc versus the euro two and a half years ago, a move which set the franc soaring in value against the single currency. The SNB also followed suit with the ECB, trimming its inflation targets. The Swiss central bank kept its 2017 inflation forecast steady at 0.3 percent but trimmed its 2018 outlook to 0.3 percent from 0.4 percent and its 2019 forecast to 1 percent from 1.1 percent. Meanwhile, on Wednesday in the U.S. the Federal Reserve pointed to the country's improved economic outlook, hiking interest rates by 0.25 percent for the second time this year. Follow CNBC International on Twitter and Facebook.
waldron
14/6/2017
14:22
Sold today. Yes, the results were great (already predicted) and cash flow sheet is healthy. But pension liabilities are sharply up and current order book is well down compared to a year ago. Couple that with possible negative impact from Brexit then SFR and other shares may be hit hard. Having bought below 49 shortly after the Brexit vote I'm not complaining.
bend1pa
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