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SBRY Sainsbury (j) Plc

273.00
-0.40 (-0.15%)
Last Updated: 15:10:59
Delayed by 15 minutes
Share Name Share Symbol Market Stock Type
Sainsbury (j) Plc SBRY London Ordinary Share
  Price Change Price Change % Share Price Last Trade
-0.40 -0.15% 273.00 15:10:59
Open Price Low Price High Price Close Price Previous Close
274.60 272.80 274.60 273.40
more quote information »
Industry Sector
FOOD & DRUG RETAILERS

Sainsbury (j) SBRY Dividends History

Announcement Date Type Currency Dividend Amount Ex Date Record Date Payment Date
25/04/2024FinalGBP0.09206/06/202407/06/202412/07/2024
02/11/2023InterimGBP0.03909/11/202310/11/202315/12/2023
27/04/2023FinalGBP0.09208/06/202309/06/202314/07/2023
03/11/2022InterimGBP0.03910/11/202211/11/202216/12/2022
28/04/2022FinalGBP0.09909/06/202210/06/202215/07/2022
04/11/2021InterimGBP0.03211/11/202112/11/202117/12/2021
28/04/2021FinalGBP0.07410/06/202111/06/202116/07/2021
05/11/2020InterimGBP0.03212/11/202013/11/202018/12/2020
05/11/2020SpecialGBP0.07312/11/202013/11/202018/12/2020
07/11/2019InterimGBP0.03314/11/201915/11/201920/12/2019
InterimGBP0.03313/11/201915/11/201920/12/2019

Top Dividend Posts

Top Posts
Posted at 10/7/2024 08:45 by loganair
Traditional supermarkets battle Lidl and Aldi for market share by KATIE WILLIAMS:


If you look at the share price history of the listed UK supermarkets, you will see that none of them have ever recovered their pre-2008 valuations. A big reason for that is the growth in popularity of Lidl and Aldi.

The German discounters first arrived in the UK in the 1990s, but have grown enormously in popularity over the past decade and a half. They now have a combined market share of 18.1%, according to data from Kantar World Panel.

This has hit Morrisons and Asda the hardest, according to Russ Mould, investment director at AJ Bell. He points out that both companies are “saddled with debt after their respective takeovers”.

Mould adds that Tesco and Sainsbury’s are holding their own when it comes to market share, but suggests this doesn’t negate the impact the German discounters have had on their margins. He says: “Their margins are not expanding and remain in the low single digits, [revealing] how competitive this business really is.”

Changing consumer habits have also created a more challenging environment for traditional supermarkets over the past decade. The UK has seen a shift away from the big weekly shop, as households instead opt for shopping little and often.

This change in behaviour means consumers are more likely to visit several stores over the course of a week, shopping around for their favourite products and the best deals. The cost-of-living crisis has only accelerated this trend, as highlighted by a recent research report from the House of Commons Library.

The report writes that “46% of adults in Great Britain reported an increase in their cost of living in March 2024 compared to a month earlier”, with 89% pointing to increased food prices as the main reason for this. It adds that 49% were shopping around more as a result, while 38% were spending less on food shopping and essentials.


Have UK supermarket stocks delivered decent investor returns?


Nevertheless, it isn’t all bad news. We’re now just over halfway through the year, and Tesco and Marks & Spencer have posted decent returns so far in 2024.

Both stocks are up by around 5% year-to-date, broadly in line with the overall FTSE 100. Tesco paid a full-year dividend of 12.10p (a yield of 3.93%). Meanwhile, Marks & Spencer’s 3p dividend represents a yield of 1.03%.

Sainsbury’s share price performance, on the other hand, has been pretty poor. It is down by around 14% year-to-date. The company announced a full-year dividend of 13.10p (a yield of 5.12%), but it is unlikely to be enough to entice investors given the poor share price performance. They can earn the same yield by simply putting their cash in the bank.

Chris Beckett, head of equity research at Quilter Cheviot, says the supermarket remains “considerably smaller than Tesco, and in the high-volume, low margin world of food retail, scale is a critical factor and the ingredient for success”.

Commentators also point out that Sainsbury’s non-food business (including Argos) has experienced a slowdown of late, and is letting the side down.

Mould says: “It’s beginning to have a lot of similarities to the Marks & Spencer of old, running a two-pronged business with one engine constantly spluttering. Marks & Spencer has finally fixed its engine problem and is now racing away, which might give some hope to Sainsbury’s situation.”

If interest rates fall later this year and inflation continues to slow, supermarkets will be hoping to see shoppers putting more items in their baskets. This could create a tailwind going forward.
Posted at 03/7/2024 10:02 by philanderer
‘Buy’ Sainsbury’s, says Jefferies


Declines in non-food sales at Sainsbury’s (SBRY) should have hit their trough as an improving consumer environment drives sales, says Jefferies.

Analyst Frederick Wild retained his ‘buy’ recommendation and target price of 300p on the Citywire Elite Companies AA-rated supermarket, which tumbled 2.9% to 250.4p on Tuesday.

It reported like-for-like sales up 2.7% in the first quarter compared to 4.8% last quarter, and 9.8% the same time last year. Grocery sales were up but general merchandising lagged. However, the group still expects retail underlying operating profit of between £1.01bn and £1.06bn for the full year.

‘An exceptionally strong grocery performance at Sainsbury’s in the first quarter was diluted by a more downbeat delivery in the general merchandise businesses, particularly Argos,’ said Wild.

‘This should represent the trough, which feels well understood by the market given the shares’ recent underperformance.217;

Wild added that sunnier weather in recent weeks ‘should underpin sequential acceleration, with the chief drivers through the rest of the year being an improving consumer environment and an easing comparative’.


citywire.com
Posted at 03/7/2024 08:33 by davebowler
Citywire-
Declines in non-food sales at Sainsbury’s (SBRY) should have hit their trough as an improving consumer environment drives sales, says Jefferies.

Analyst Frederick Wild retained his ‘buy’ recommendation and target price of 300p on the Citywire Elite Companies AA-rated supermarket, which tumbled 2.9% to 250.4p on Tuesday.

It reported like-for-like sales up 2.7% in the first quarter compared to 4.8% last quarter, and 9.8% the same time last year. Grocery sales were up but general merchandising lagged. However, the group still expects retail underlying operating profit of between £1.01bn and £1.06bn for the full year.

‘An exceptionally strong grocery performance at Sainsbury’s in the first quarter was diluted by a more downbeat delivery in the general merchandise businesses, particularly Argos,’ said Wild.

‘This should represent the trough, which feels well understood by the market given the shares’ recent underperformance.217;

Wild added that sunnier weather in recent weeks ‘should underpin sequential acceleration, with the chief drivers through the rest of the year being an improving consumer environment and an easing comparative’.
Posted at 20/6/2024 10:22 by loganair
I hope this £250m is paid as a one off Special Dividend of 10p + normal dividend, rather then further Share Buy Backs.
Posted at 06/6/2024 09:27 by tyroneshares
9.2p of that is due to the dividend being XD today.
Posted at 02/6/2024 09:22 by loganair
New minor risk - Insider selling:

There has been significant insider selling in the company's shares over the past 3 months.

Total value of shares sold: UK£765k


This is considered a minor risk. There are several reasons why an insider may be selling, including to cover a tax obligation or pay for some other expense. However, we generally consider it a negative if insiders have been selling, especially if they do so below the current price. It implies that they considered a lower price to be reasonable. This is a weak signal, but if there is a pattern of unexplained selling, it can be a sign the insider believes the company's stock is overpriced. Note: We only include open market transactions and private dispositions of directly owned stock by individuals, not by corporations or trusts.

Currently, the following risks have been identified for the company:

Major Risk:

..Dividend is not well covered by earnings and cash flows.
..Payout ratio: 223%
..Cash payout ratio: 129%

Minor Risks:

..Large one-off items impacting financial results.
..Profit margins are more than 30% lower than last year (0.4% net profit margin).
..Significant insider selling over the past 3 months (UK£765k sold).
Posted at 07/5/2024 23:55 by philanderer
Daily Telegraph tip

'Questor: don’t let this supermarket’s results put you off'

Questor share tips: don’t let the dire economy overshadow this retailer’s growth



Questor says: buy

Ticker: SBRY

Share price at close: 267.8p




or
Posted at 03/5/2024 16:28 by pirates4
Enhanced Returns for Shareholders - Progressive dividend commitment and share buyback The strength of our balance sheet and cash generation will allow us to invest capital in targeted areas, further strengthening our capabilities, driving growth and efficiency and generating higher profits and returns. A higher level of capital investment is balanced with a reinforced commitment to strong free cash flow generation and stronger returns for shareholders. Specifically, we will now commit to a progressive dividend policy from the start of next financial year and the commencement of a share buyback programme, with £200 million of share capital to be bought back over the course of the next financial year.
Posted at 22/4/2024 22:00 by loganair
Jefferies upgraded its stance on a host of UK retail stocks on Monday - Marks & Spencer, Next and Sainsbury's were all upgraded to 'buy' from 'hold'.


On Sainsbury's, the bank said fears around an excess capex burden limiting free cash flow upside have provoked intense investor concern since the capital markets day in February.

"We believe this overstates the risks and overlooks the positives emerging from the most supportive competitive backdrop in UK grocery in decades," it said.

"SBRY in particular have outlined a multi-pronged approach to capitalising on this situation. As we noted after the CMD, the plan is to enable margin expansion through volume growth and opex control.

"All of which offer substantial upside to FCF, which we see at a cumulative £1.8bn over the next three years versus guidance for 'at least £1.6bn'."

Jefferies has a 300p price target on the shares.
Posted at 17/3/2023 11:04 by loganair
Something’s wrong with the case for investing in Sainsbury’s for its shareholder dividend, but the stock still has its attractions:



City analysts following supermarket chain J Sainsbury expect the dividend to decline by just over 7% next year.

And if that happens, it will be a blow for shareholders who are in the stock for income.

But why is it likely to happen? After all, those same analysts have pencilled in modest growth in revenue for the current trading year and for the following period to March 2024.

Earnings on the slide:

However, the reason for the decline looks like it’s because the level of the dividend is tied to earnings. In last year’s full-year report, the directors said the dividend payout ratio was running at around 53% of underlying earnings. And they had an ambition to raise it to 60%.

But earnings are on the slide, by just over 3% this trading year and by almost 8% the next. So the analysts look like they are tracking those declining profits lower with their dividend predictions.

This is not good news. When entering into dividend-led investments, I look for rising financial figures. And that means identifying a stream of rising dividends backed by a business capable of delivering annual upticks in revenue, earnings and cash flow.

For me then, J Sainsbury now fails that fundamental test. Profit margins are caught in a pincer squeeze between rising costs and pressure to keep selling prices down.

For example, staff wages have been rising. And cash-strapped customers can choose to shop elsewhere if Sainsbury’s prices become too high for them.

The company is facing the problem of competition head on. And it price-matched rival supermarket Aldi on around 300 products. But such initiatives tend to bear down on profits. And that means lower dividends for shareholders given the current dividend policy.

This is not the dividend progression I’m looking for, it’s dividend regression.

The yield remains high:

But there are positives in the business. On Tuesday, the company announced a deal to buy the freeholds of 21 of its supermarkets for just under £431m.

The stores are currently leased from investment vehicle Highbury and Dragon and are among 26 Sainsbury’s supermarkets in the portfolio. But the company already owns 49% of Highbury and Dragon. And the new deal will see J Sainsbury buy the remaining 51% from Supermarket Income REIT.

The move looks set to reduce ongoing rent costs. And the directors plan to sell the remaining five stores in the portfolio. But the benefits may prove to be small overall. And that’s because the company operates more than 600 supermarkets and about 800 convenience stores.

Meanwhile, even with the dividend set to decline, the forward-looking yield is still an eye-catching 4.8% for the current trading year. But it may go higher if the stock continues to fall in this difficult market. As I write, the share price is 256p.

But any supermarket stock making it into my portfolio must have a current yield of 5%, or higher. And there must also be dividend growth forecast ahead.

For me, that kind of return is needed to compensate for the risks of holding the shares. After all, supermarket businesses are low-margin, high-volume enterprises. And they face stiff competition, which adds risks for investors.

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