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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Royal Dutch Shell Plc LSE:RDSA London Ordinary Share GB00B03MLX29 'A' ORD EUR0.07
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  10.60 0.75% 1,420.40 1,420.40 1,420.80 1,423.40 1,403.40 1,409.80 4,123,297 16:35:14
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Oil & Gas Producers 13,205.3 -19,723.5 -203.3 - 58,254

Royal Dutch Shell Share Discussion Threads

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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
11/5/2020
17:10
Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 29.98 -3.20% Gasoline NYMEX 0.95 -1.11% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.09 +0.39% WTI 25.554 USD -1.00% FTSE 100 5,939.73 +0.06% Dow Jones 24,178.81 -0.63% CAC 40 4,490.22 -1.31% SBF 120 3,556.78 -1.33% Euro STOXX 50 2,883.6 -0.87% DAX 10,824.99 -0.73% Ftse Mib 17,388.29 -0.29% Eni 8.631 +0.00% Total 32.385 -1.82% Engie 9.76 -0.39% Bp 313.85 -0.65% Vodafone 113 +0.07% Royal Dutch Shell A 1,313.8 -0.51% Royal Dutch Shell B 1,262 -0.13%
waldron
11/5/2020
09:58
RDSB RBC Capital Markets Outperform 1,800.00 - Reiterates
adrian j boris
11/5/2020
07:30
Https://investing.thisismoney.co.uk/broker-views/index/date/11-05-2020
florenceorbis
08/5/2020
08:41
Euronext Amsterdam > Royal Dutch Shell RDSA GB00B03MLX29 [Pays-Bas] ROYAL DUTCH SHELL (RDSA) STARTING THE DAY UP IN HOLLAND Https://www.marketscreener.com/ROYAL-DUTCH-SHELL-6273/?type_recherche=rapide&;mots=RDSA
grupo guitarlumber
08/5/2020
08:20
Https://investing.thisismoney.co.uk/broker-views/index/date/08-05-2020
florenceorbis
08/5/2020
08:16
Https://www.marketscreener.com/news/Green-hydrogen-s-time-has-come-say-advocates-eying-post-pandemic-world--30564659/?countview=0 Royal Dutch Shell and Dutch gas firm Gasunie unveiled plans in February to build a mammoth wind-powered hydrogen plant in the northern Netherlands, capable of producing 800,000 tonnes of hydrogen by 2040.
florenceorbis
07/5/2020
17:32
Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 30.62 +3.03% Gasoline NYMEX 0.95 +6.74% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.16 -0.74% WTI 26.508 USD +4.03% FTSE 100 5,935.98 +1.40% Dow Jones 24,089.78 +1.80% CAC 40 4,501.44 +1.54% SBF 120 3,559.89 +1.45% Euro STOXX 50 2,880.6 +1.27% DAX 10,759.27 +1.44% Ftse Mib 17,208.81 +0.29% Eni 8.556 +1.58% Total 32.57 +1.15% Engie 9.69 +1.17% Bp 315.9 +0.70% Vodafone 112.92 +0.30% Royal Dutch Shell A 1,320.6 +2.71% Royal Dutch Shell B 1,263.6 +2.68%
waldron
07/5/2020
06:06
Https://investing.thisismoney.co.uk/broker-views/index/date/07-05-2020
florenceorbis
06/5/2020
17:42
Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 28.98 -6.43% Gasoline NYMEX 0.87 -5.09% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.19 -5.23% WTI 24.793 USD -10.20% FTSE 100 5,853.76 +0.07% Dow Jones 23,830.25 -0.22% CAC 40 4,433.38 -1.11% SBF 120 3,509.17 -1.00% Euro STOXX 50 2,843.76 -1.15% DAX 10,606.2 -1.15% Ftse Mib 17,167.38 -1.27% Eni 8.423 -3.04% Total 32.2 -2.16% Engie 9.578 +0.15% Bp 313.7 -1.63% Vodafone 112.58 +0.09% Royal Dutch Shell A 1,285.8 -3.73% Royal Dutch Shell B 1,230.6 -4.11%
waldron
06/5/2020
07:16
Https://investing.thisismoney.co.uk/broker-views/index/date/06-05-2020
florenceorbis
05/5/2020
17:54
Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 30.35 +11.58% Gasoline NYMEX 0.90 +7.61% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.35 +5.25% WTI 26.012 USD +10.00% FTSE 100 5,849.42 +1.66% Dow Jones 24,162.84 +1.74% CAC 40 4,483.13 +2.40% SBF 120 3,544.63 +2.47% Euro STOXX 50 2,875.91 +2.25% DAX 10,729.46 +2.51% Ftse Mib 17,365.86 +1.94% Eni 8.687 +5.80% Total 32.91 +7.94% Engie 9.564 +1.27% Bp 318.9 +6.09% Vodafone 112.48 +2.57% Royal Dutch Shell A 1,335.6 +5.55% Royal Dutch Shell B 1,283.4 +5.06%
waldron
05/5/2020
10:50
Https://www.investing.com/analysis/earnings-of-big-3-oil-majors-sending-mixed-signals-on-demand-recovery-200523649
adrian j boris
05/5/2020
09:10
Https://investing.thisismoney.co.uk/broker-views/index/date/05-05-2020
florenceorbis
04/5/2020
17:27
Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 26.63 +0.72% Gasoline NYMEX 0.80 +1.44% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.20 +3.00% WTI 22.206 USD +3.95% FTSE 100 5,753.78 -0.16% Dow Jones 23,537.96 -0.78% CAC 40 4,378.23 -4.24% SBF 120 3,459.11 -4.19% Euro STOXX 50 2,812.58 -3.94% DAX 10,466.8 -3.64% Ftse Mib 17,075.24 -3.48% Eni 8.211 -5.77% Total 30.49 -7.18% Engie 9.444 -4.64% Bp 300.6 +0.59% Vodafone 109.66 -0.65% Royal Dutch Shell A 1,265.4 +2.74% Royal Dutch Shell B 1,221.6 +1.80%
waldron
04/5/2020
12:30
Four of the UK’s 10 biggest dividend payers have cut or frozen payments: will the rest follow suit? by Kyle Caldwell from Money Observer | 4th May 2020 09:45 We review whether the other big six income stocks will join Royal Dutch Shell and UK banks in cutting or suspending dividend payments. Royal Dutch Shell has become the fourth member of last year’s top 10 UK dividend payers to reduce income payments to UK investors. The oil major cut its dividend for the first time since the Second World War in a bid to put the business on a more resilient footing, following collapse in the oil price following the outbreak of coronavirus. Its decision to cut the dividend was undoubtedly a difficult decision to make; however, that decision was taken out of the hands of management at fellow top-10 dividend payers HSBC, Royal Bank of Scotland and Lloyds Banking Group. The country’s biggest banks, in a series of co-ordinated statements at the start of April, announced that they would temporarily suspend dividend payments and share buybacks for both their 2019 and 2020 financial years, following talks with the Bank of England. The suspensions were made to put banks in a better position to support the economy during the current uncertain climate. Will the other six members of the top 10 UK dividend payers, which accounted for 64% of total dividends for the UK market in 2019, follow suit? Of the top three payers, Royal Dutch Shell and HSBC will be leaving income investors feeling short-changed in 2020, but the same cannot be said for BP. The oil major, which updated the market two days before Royal Dutch Shell announced its cut, has raised its dividend for the first quarter of the year to 10.5 cents a share, up from 10.25 cents a share. It did so against the backdrop of a slump in its underlying profits, down by two-thirds in the first quarter of 2020 versus the same quarter a year earlier. The second quarter payment, though, is far from guaranteed. Its dividend yield is just over 10%. Also providing recent market update was GlaxoSmithKline, the sixth biggest dividend payer in 2019. It has opted to keep its dividend payment flat at 19p per share for the first quarter. Its dividend yield is 4.5%. Fellow pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, the ninth biggest UK income payer in 2019, has a lower dividend yield of just under 3%, but is viewed as being stable as the firm has produced slow and steady dividend growth over the past decade. Another top 10 member expected to retain dividend payments is British American Tobacco. Being highly cash-generative, tobacco companies tend to pay reliable dividends. In a recent statement the firm was bullish, stating there has been little impact on consumer demand for its products following coronavirus. As a result, the firm said its dividend will grow in sterling terms. Elsewhere, the two mining members of the top 10 are continuing to pay dividends in the short term: Rio Tinto and BHP Group. Mining, of course, is a highly cyclical sector, so there are serious question markets over whether dividends will be maintained. But in 2019 the sector produced the greatest source of dividend growth, with both Rio Tinto and BHP Group paying special dividends, having sold assets and strengthened balance sheets over the previous couple of years. Earlier this year, ahead of coronavirus escalating to a global pandemic, Michael Kempe, chief operating officer at Link Market Services, cautioned that 2020 looked likely to record for the worst dividend growth rate in five years. This forecast stemmed from the fact that the UK market had become reliant on the ability of mining companies to increase dividend payments as less than half of the 15 highest dividend payers in 2019 announced a higher dividend than in 2018. He added: “If anything, another strong performance from the mining sector (in 2019) highlights how UK dividend growth is precariously reliant on eye-catching increases from two or three big companies in a highly cyclical industry. “It’s worth remembering that just four years ago, the mining sector slashed payouts by half to cope with a commodities downturn.” This article was originally published in our sister magazine Money Observer
la forge
04/5/2020
10:21
Http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/75531607.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst
adrian j boris
04/5/2020
09:17
Https://www.forbes.com/sites/rrapier/2020/05/03/how-investors-should-interpret-shells-first-dividend-cut-in-75-years/#2e1d769865da Editors' Pick|672 views|May 3, 2020,06:00pm EDT How Investors Should Interpret Shell’s First Dividend Cut In 75 Years Robert Rapier Robert RapierSenior Contributor Energy Last week Royal Dutch Shell did something that would have been nearly unthinkable at the beginning of this year. The company cut its dividend for the first time in 75 years. This is remarkable considering the ups and downs of the oil industry of the past few decades. Prices have collapsed many times since then, albeit we have never before seen a major benchmark turn negative. But the COVID-19 pandemic has hit oil demand in an unprecedented way. A few days ago Bloomberg posted an article showing that energy demand has just dropped by the largest percentage since World War II (which was the last time Shell cut its dividend). That’s true, but in 1945 global oil demand had yet to reach 10 million barrels per day (BPD). In contrast, COVID-19 has sidelined an estimated 30 million BPD of oil demand. Thus, the global oil industry is coping with the largest demand collapse, by far, in its history. This demand collapse is impacting both refiners and oil producers. Shell, as an integrated supermajor, is both. Refiners often benefit from falling oil prices, because they generally see margins expand. That’s why an integrated oil company is usually more stable during the ups and downs of oil prices. Upstream (oil and gas production) and downstream (refining) generally perform out of phase with each other, which helps balance out the cycles. But the current collapse is hitting both ends — oil demand and finished product demand. This creates one of the most challenging economic climates the integrated oil companies have faced — perhaps ever. Norway’s Equinor previously announced a two-thirds dividend cut, and now Shell has followed. Chevron CVX ’s CEO has publicly stated that the company has enough cash on hand for now to maintain its dividend, but it will also come under increasing pressure as long as oil prices remain depressed. The oil producers and the refiners will remain under the most pressure, while the integrated companies won’t be far behind. The midstreams — the pipeline companies — are in somewhat better shape. However, they are not immune to the forces impacting the rest of the energy sector, as Plains All American Pipeline showed when they recently announced a distribution cut. I think investors should heed the underlying warning in Shell’s first dividend cut in most of our lifetimes. Consider the pressure they must have been under not to break their 75 year streak. That is evidence that they see the current crisis unlike others the oil industry has faced in recent decades. They aren’t sure when oil demand will recover. Thus, investors should be exceedingly cautious in the energy sector for the foreseeable future. This is especially true of oil-weighted producers, and refiners. Safer bets are the midstreams and natural gas producers. The latter have shown much greater strength than the oil producers, because associated natural gas production is falling as oil producers shut in production. That means natural gas supplies will continue to tighten in the months ahead.
adrian j boris
04/5/2020
07:27
Https://investing.thisismoney.co.uk/broker-views/index/date/04-05-2020
florenceorbis
04/5/2020
07:02
Dow futures fall more than 100 points amid concerns over reopening the economy Published Sun, May 3 20206:03 PM EDTUpdated 3 hours ago Fred Imbert @foimbert Stock futures fell on Sunday night as traders weighed the reopening of the economy along with brewing tensions between China and the U.S. Dow Jones Industrial Average futures were down by 152 points, pointing to a Monday opening decline of around 147 points. S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 futures also pointed to losses at the open on Monday for the two indexes.
waldron
04/5/2020
06:59
Https://www.cnbc.com/2020/05/03/stocks-are-in-little-danger-of-retesting-the-march-low-art-hogan-says.html
waldron
04/5/2020
06:53
European markets head for lower open as US-China tensions rise over coronavirus Published Mon, May 4 20201:15 AM EDT Holly Ellyatt @HollyEllyatt Key Points London’s FTSE is seen opening 30 points lower at 5,725, Germany’s DAX is seen 116 points lower at 10,490, France’s CAC 40 is seen 61 points lower at 4,384 and Italy’s FTSE MIB is seen 195 points lower at 16,921, according to IG. European stocks look set to follow the negative trend set by their Asian counterparts Monday where markets traded lower in reaction to rising tensions between Washington and Beijing.
waldron
03/5/2020
20:52
Global oil demand starts long, uncertain road to recovery May 3, 2020 3:08 PM ET|About: Exxon Mobil Corporation (XOM)|By: Liz Kiesche, SA News Editor Oil executives and traders see signs that fuel consumption is starting to recover, but they say it's likely to be a slow, painful process. "I believe we have seen the bottom," Marco Dunand, co-founder of Mercuria Energy Group, one of the five largest trading houses, told Bloomberg News. Oil traders say the recovery in demand is likely to take more than a year before it reaches pre-COVID-19 levels of ~100M bbl/day. Some say it may never reach pre-pandemic levels. One big consumer of fuel, airlines, doesn't expect travel demand to return to 2019 levels for years. And while the demand decline is past the bottom, it will take time for supply cuts to catch up. “Globally, we are at the inflection point where we are past the worst for oil demand destruction but not for supply destruction,” said Olivier Jakob, managing director at consultant Petromatrix. “This should help price stabilization.”; Unsold crude and oil products are likely to accumulate into June and maybe into July. The rebound is coming first to where COVID-19 started — Wuhan, China, with weekday traffic back at pre-pandemic levels; weekend traffic, though is still depressed. And in the U.S., refiners saw gasoline demand at 64% of the normal level in the latest seven-day average vs. 55% early last month.
waldron
03/5/2020
13:31
Https://www.zonebourse.com/ROYAL-DUTCH-SHELL-6273/?type_recherche=rapide&mots=RDS Next week might see falls toward strong supports of 13.80 and then 10.67 euros
waldron
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