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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Jtc LSE:JTC London Ordinary Share JE00BF4X3P53 ORD GBP0.01
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +14.50p +4.32% 350.00p 326.00p 345.00p 345.00p 326.00p 326.00p 1,595 16:35:02
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Financial - - - - 388.13

Jtc Share Discussion Threads

Showing 70551 to 70574 of 70575 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
16/12/2018
21:34
That's a recipe for never ending negotiations mf.
maxk
16/12/2018
21:17
But kiwi, the point is surely that while we could slash corporation tax, if we don't do it now, when their business is suffering, it will be too late. That is the problem with a no deal Brexit: it isn't that it is right or wrong, but simply that it has not been planned for. My sister in law runs a casting agency and business are looking to cast for adverts to be filmed in the spring in European locations, and nobody knows whether British actors will be able to act in those adverts or not. So work has ground to a standstill. Many businesses are in this boat. They can cope with staying in the EU. They can cope with leaving the EU with clear guidelines on how they can trade with the EU. But they are totally screwed if they don't know what is going to happen. I would go so far as to say that the only course of action that will avoid huge, pointless damage to British business is to revoke Article 50, negotiate the terms of leave and then leave immediately once they are agreed and understood. To set a date for leaving when you don't know the terms you are leaving on is suicide for a huge part of the economy.
mad foetus
16/12/2018
21:07
Yes. One thing's for sure : noone will take responsibility for the consequences.
brucie5
16/12/2018
20:49
Max is still peddling the investors' dream. What he has difficulty focussing on is the reality nightmare. We almost need to see it happen to prove a point. ;)) ………;……̷0;……then he would blame the leaves, the weather or his keyboard.
alphorn
16/12/2018
20:28
Or rather it doesn't have a left, statist slant!
7kiwi
16/12/2018
20:11
Bruce aint interested in that sort of stuff Kiwi, it doesent have the right slant. Meanwhile something else that doesent matter in Bruce's world. hTtps://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/229963 Over 160k and counting
maxk
16/12/2018
19:43
So a small proportion. Of those small businesses that might face difficulty, we could halve corporation tax for say three years, to help them. And of course, sign trade deals with the parts of the world that are growing.
7kiwi
16/12/2018
19:31
7kiwi, That's the kind of complacent claptrap I'm talking about. From 2016: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36029211 "The total number of businesses in the country is 5.4 million, according to statistics from the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. So, if Vote Leave's 6% estimate is right, that would suggest 324,000 exporting companies: considerably higher than Britain Stronger in Europe's "over 200,000", a figure which includes importers as well as exporters. Reality Check verdict: It looks in this case as though one side or the other, or possibly both, has been too conservative." That's a lot of livelihoods you feel able to be glib about.
brucie5
16/12/2018
19:22
90-odd percent of UK businesses don't export to the EU. So, they won't be impacted at all by Brexit.
7kiwi
16/12/2018
18:19
But of course to parliament, that is totally unacceptable. Lambs to the slaughter. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- But I thought Brexiteers wanted to uphold Parliamentary sovereignty..? So shouldn't they (and MPs decisions) in turn be upheld by Brexiteers? This is not just a facetious point. I think MPs have so far managed to abrogate their consciences, which mainly warn them of the damage of Brexit to their constituents, on the basis that they have effectively been overruled by the Referendum. The idea that public officers should no longer act according to their consciences, seems troubling in the extreme. I guess the only way out of this is to put themselves (and their platform) before their constituents once more. Or failing this, the People's Vote, which is increasingly becoming the only way through, barring the No Deal, which most MPs know would be a disaster, not just for the economy, but for them, should they allow it happen. But Alphorn is right: time is tight. No Deal is an accident, possibly waiting to happen. Or as the unintended consequence of a bet that goes badly wrong, as was David Cameron's, along with so many disastrous wars that should have been avoided.
brucie5
16/12/2018
18:04
Unless there is a meaningful realisation that no deal is a viable alternative, that means Hammond allocating funds as appropriate and a massive charm offensive instigated by the likes of Fox, Hunt and Javid to convince the proletariat, the EU will just let the inevitable happen. The only way to get a decent deal is for no deal to be the certain fallback position. But of course to parliament, that is totally unacceptable. Lambs to the slaughter.
fireplace22
16/12/2018
17:45
As a general comment, irrespective of views, time is running very tight. The Christmas break will take up a few weeks, then New Year. Have to consider the availability of ALL the players needed to complete whatever - new leader, general election, new referendum, meetings with the EU27 etc etc. Getting backed into a No Deal as the unintended consequences becomes a real possibility or pushing off Art50.
alphorn
16/12/2018
17:39
Pendragon - as I posted I was sure that you were aware. David Davis recently was NOT which is a bit scary to be polite. We are on the same page with your recent post. The wording of any questions would have to be 'idiot proof'. The lack of knowledge on this subject is more than worrying - hence my analogy with the subprime issue in last night's post.
alphorn
16/12/2018
17:33
Yes, and most grudgingly agree that its acceptable if the backstop issue can be sorted. Unfortunately it is the lynchpin of the EU negotiation stance and is destroying any chance of consensus in the UK. 'Northern Irish Labour MP Kate Hoey has accused the EU and Ireland of “connivingR21; together to undermine Brexit and trap the UK as close as possible to the EU.'
fireplace22
16/12/2018
17:21
The difference FP is that there is a concrete doc on the table to be agreed or not.
pendragon2
16/12/2018
17:14
I'm slow everyday PD2, but I think that ref construction will bamboozle more than a few at the point of voting. As Liam Fox said today if there is a second ref on this - essentially because parliament didn't like the result of the first why shouldn't the Scots have a further go at theirs and if the vote (on the EU) is indeed to remain why shouldn't the leavers demand a best out of three. Anarchy.
fireplace22
16/12/2018
17:09
fireplace22 16 Dec '18 - 16:59 - 70556 of 70556 0 0 0 Liam Fox reported on Marr this morning that several solutions of the Irish backstop are in the melting pot... ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Which melting pot would that be? And does it have the same holes in it as Liam's earlier more infamous assertions? Liam is also, curiously, now on the wrong side of his former chums in the ultra tendency, along with Gove, though of course they continue to style themselves as Brexiteers. No love lost between them. As one commentator in the FT yesterday said, these strands in the Tory party are rapidly becoming like the Jewish zealots in the Life of Brian.
brucie5
16/12/2018
17:03
fireplace - one referendum - 2 questions - you seem to be a bit slow today!!!
pendragon2
16/12/2018
16:59
Liam Fox reported on Marr this morning that several solutions of the Irish backstop are in the melting pot, ok vague hopes as usual but get the NI dems on board with any that give them the guarantees they need and the Tory Party's ERG will fall into line. Johnson said as much last week. With May out of the way a half decent trading agreement can be reached thereafter. Parliament is too intransigent wrt a no deal although the attitude of some appear to be softening towards it. A referendum is in no one's best interest and if it is 2 refs as indicated by PD2 thats OTT.
fireplace22
16/12/2018
16:58
alp - i think it needs to be made clear that leaving without a deal now, does not mean never having dealings with the EU and they will have to be negotiated. All the propaganda I have seen so far implies that a hard Brexit means severing relations, see countless cliff edge political cartoons. Yes, there are rafts of issues to be considered. Once a referendum was out of the way a general election becomes a legitimate exercise as it would define who gets to negotiate the future relationship and the character of relationship they would want to promote, with or without the interim arrangement and the Irish backstop. That stance could define the shape of Britain for the rest of the century. A fascinating prospect.
pendragon2
16/12/2018
16:35
"and continue negotiating the future relationship" Obviously there is no longer a transition period in that scenario as I am sure you are aware. What a strange question. In what circumstances would you not want to have a future relationship with your physically nearest and biggest trading partner? (Understood that there are more topics than just trade).
alphorn
16/12/2018
16:32
Pen, I think that forms the basis of an entirely reasonable choice, except some may have issues with the euphemistic language of 'continue negotiating the future relationship'.. when what I presume you mean is, leave the EU without a deal'. That would need to be spelled out.
brucie5
16/12/2018
16:16
for some odd reason the Guardian are great google supporters and like the EU, yet pose as progressives. EU: Kicking the can down the road with delays won't provide any answers, nor I suspect will a general election as a Corbyn government would be just as split as the Tories. So how about this for a referendum question: 2 parts, both questions to be answered: A. Do you support the proposed transitional agreement negotiated by Barnier and May? YES. NO. If there is a majority for Yes then the agreement goes ahead and the answers to question B are not required. If there is a NO majority for Question A, the following question will be counted: B. Do you wish to leave the EU on March 29, 2019 and continue negotiating the future relationship, or do you wish to remain in the EU. LEAVE REMAIN Both sides could rally their firepower at that point and a short yet intensive campaign should be possible between now and the end of March, say a vote on MARCH 10.
pendragon2
16/12/2018
16:04
i don,t see as how the betrayal involves the labour party, once may took charge of brexit stabbing davies on the way through whilst negotiating another deal behind his back,from there on she and the ministry were in sole charge as is obvious by davies leaving,the cabinet don,t appear to have been kept up to date on the progress or lack of,may/ministers must have known the backstop would fail so why did she proceed? there in is the puzzle,had she kept her cabinet/hoc up to date with her outline plan she would have known it would fail, so she would have had to negotiate a plan that was acceptable to the hoc,so why didn,t she,perhaps she was out to run this so as to time out and panic the hoc,which is working,she is to blame for the entire fiasco.
mroalan
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