Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Jtc LSE:JTC London Ordinary Share JE00BF4X3P53 ORD GBP0.01
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -3.00p -0.76% 390.00p 381.00p 390.00p 395.00p 380.00p 380.00p 70,116 16:27:03
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Financial - - - - 416.90

Jtc Share Discussion Threads

Showing 67301 to 67320 of 67325 messages
Chat Pages: 2693  2692  2691  2690  2689  2688  2687  2686  2685  2684  2683  2682  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
24/6/2018
10:58
Obviously the gunshot wounds got there post mortem to discredit our fine emergency services. Is there no level to which these Russians will not stoop!
fireplace22
24/6/2018
10:44
Pantheon Rsources (PANR) Now offering fantastic value after a few setbacks with a collapsed well casing and water ingress. Onshore Texas gas, already producing some revenues and has more than 301 mmboe to target.
englishlongbow
23/6/2018
21:53
Incompetence sounds rather kind to me MT. :-)
jtcod
23/6/2018
18:15
Lol...that is staggering, mt!
mr roper
23/6/2018
16:05
It's not just drink! The sub-30 age group are the first generation bought up with commonplace fast-food and 2-3+ takeout meals per week.The large food processors that supply that sector have become ever more adept at removing the 'value' (aka the nutritional part of foodstuffs), selling that on for animal foodstuff & then blending the nutritionally devalued remainder with chemicals & then selling into the human food chain.Fast food & the general restaurant trade are businesses in search of profit. They are not particularly interested in the long term health impact on their customers.Scratch cooking is a dying skill set amongst the young .. the 'convenience' of the microwave and takeout food now far more important than the concept of healthy eating. No wonder we have a fat & diabetes problem. City living in cramped apartments will simply increase this
mattjos
23/6/2018
12:29
UK spending on health is 6th lowest in the G7, but quite a bit above OECD average. htTps://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/healthcaresystem/articles/howdoesukhealthcarespendingcompareinternationally/2016-11-01 UK health outcomes are 10th out of 11 countries studied in the COmmonwealth report. htTps://iea.org.uk/media/commonwealth-fund-study-wrongly-focuses-on-inputs-rather-than-health-outcomes/ I would agree we need to spend more money. But I am not at all comfortable splurging cash into a nationalised monopoly. We need a mix of provision, and encouragement built into the system for people to look after themselves, like Singapore with their individual health accounts.
7kiwi
23/6/2018
12:27
A female relative with over thirty years teaching experience in secondary schools in the state sector took early retirement recently. She said the profession is no longer the one she trained for and enjoyed for most of her first two decades - namely, being able to help children acquire knowledge, competencies and values. As a specialist Maths teacher, to her intense frustration she increasingly found she was spending far too much time in class just trying to maintain some semblance of order rather then teaching - due to serious pupil behavioural issues for which she and other experienced teachers at the school received extremely modest support from the young, high flying 'progressive' head.
mount teide
23/6/2018
12:25
I think drink puts a burden on the NHS full stop Kiwi. :-)
jtcod
23/6/2018
12:23
But the young also place a burden on the NHS. Try going to A&E late at night and see all the nice healthy young people with fighting injuries after too much to drink.
7kiwi
23/6/2018
11:58
NHS - many of the challenges facing the NHS(and possible solutions) have been well documented here: 7Kiwi - 'We need to take a long look at alternative funding models that preserve 'free at the point of use' principle, but also break the inefficient and ineffective state monopoly. The Netherlands, Singapore or Switzerland would be good examples to consider.' jtc - '..the NHS is not faring well because we simply cannot afford the original vision. It’s a regrettable state of affairs that despite being obvious for decades has been left to fester because of things like the political bias of being shackled to an idea, blind faith in the people’s ‘right’ to care and stubborn pride in the system and ideal.' serratia - 'A significant problem within the NHS is efficiency.' Sadly, modest relative standards and cheap populism have characterised the NHS over the last 30 years and will persist so long as we allow our healthcare service to be politicised. Dr Kristian Niemietz head of health and welfare at the Institute of Economic Affairs recently said: "Our brilliant, hardworking brewers and publicans have not seen a real-terms pay rise in years. This is a disgrace. We all rely on their tireless work, their skill and their dedication for our after-work pint. Where would we be without them? This government has taken our brewers and publicans for granted for too long, so my message to them is this: enough is enough!” "No politician has said this – but if we had a National Beer Service, they definitely would, at least if that meant that the incomes of brewers and publicans were set by politicians rather than by the market. Because this is what happens when pay issues are politicised. Staff may be ignored between elections, and then suddenly wooed and promoted to the role of “the backbone of the nation” at election time. The Labour Party’s promise to raise the pay of NHS staff at the last election by more than 3%, at a cost of around £1bn, is a good example." "Regardless of whether you think that health workers’ pay is too low, too high, or about right, the issue’s politicisation cannot produce anything other than cheap populism. Bidding wars between politicians about who can shower a profession with more praise are cringeworthy." "Decisions over pay, working hours and working conditions should be decentralised, and removed from politics altogether. They should be negotiated locally between individual Clinical Commissioning Groups, individual NHS trusts, and the representatives of various health professions. The Department of Health should not be involved."
mount teide
23/6/2018
11:26
Jt, completely agree re education. My sister has responsibility for 3 autistic kids who are lumped in a class with 28 other kids. She’s had many threats against her from these kids. They are anything but easy to manage and support from the headteacher is non existent
mr roper
23/6/2018
10:56
A significant problem within the NHS is efficiency. I can give a number of examples but here's just one. I know of a surgeon who carries out a particular operation and there's a waiting list. During the week he carries out x operations/day on NHS patients. Operations are not carried out on Fridays as the surgeon's need to see that the patient has recovered the next day. On weekends the surgeon does the same operation on private patients and the operations/day increases significantly.
serratia
23/6/2018
10:39
The lack of funding in the NHS gets a lot of exposure and has always been a high profile political subject. Those acute shortages, bad experiences and abominable conditions for staff are mirrored in education but perhaps because the recipients of the service are children rather than adults the risks and events are less seen or heard.Imo there are going to be some horror stories coming out of primary schools in coming years because the system now forces schools to let go of key staff to balance the budgets. Critical staffing levels are now impossible to maintain. In primary schools I know of head teachers and deputies voluntarily going down to part time to balance the budget. Letting go of up to 70% of teaching assistants with the same aim. I heard of one Head teacher taking a pay cut by going down to 3 days and still having to cover permanently in the kitchen during lunch hours because they couldn't afford to staff the kitchen properly. These schools have budgets down to the nearest pound on every item and yet still cannot provide the basic staff cover.Primary schools these days have high levels of children who would not be there in times past. Autistic children who need one on one care. Severely troubled 6 year olds who will attempt to injure or stab a member of staff given the first opportunity. You think a 6 year old can be easily managed. Some are not. Education is next I think. Obviously not on as grand a scale as mid staffs but the public will be just as incredulous and horrified to learn of the circumstances when something goes seriously wrong.
jtcod
23/6/2018
10:24
Don’t forget the impact of population growth. The last 15 years has seen an additional 7m people added to the uk population. I’d be all for taking health out of the political spectrum altogether and have it run by a non political independent body.
mr roper
23/6/2018
09:57
Hazl I think the NHS is not faring well because we simply cannot afford the original vision. It's a regrettable state of affairs that despite being obvious for decades has been left to fester because of things like the political bias of being shackled to an idea, blind faith in the people's 'right' to care and stubborn pride in the system and ideal.To me, Kiwi's suggestion represents a sensible approach to the problem but regrettably it would have been just as sensible 30 yrs ago.Regarding Mid StaffsI really feel for the members of staff who did care in that situation and made complaints which fell on deaf ears but soldiered on. Their careers will be forever blighted by the notoriety of events there.
jtcod
23/6/2018
09:25
I usually enjoy M Teide's posts but cannot agree with the conclusions in the NHS post. The NHS was, and still is, a great institution that should be preserved. The reason it is not faring as well,as it used to over the last 'x' number of years,is because of continued political pressure to denigrate it.
hazl
23/6/2018
09:19
The Swiss and French systems are both pretty decent. I’d say a superior experience to the nhs from my personal experiences of them both.
mr roper
23/6/2018
09:09
SO, I specifically mention countries such as Holland, France, Switzerland and Singapore as ideas for how we might run our health service differently, and Bluster asks how America is doing. America's health service is even worse than ours imho, and shouldn't be a model for reform. htTps://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/nhs/11853029/The-NHS-is-broken.-What-should-replace-it.html htTps://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/05/29/health-system-one-worst-world-dont-learn-best/
7kiwi
23/6/2018
08:51
Probably best to get our own house in order before pointing at others. Mid staffs was like something out of a horror story.
mr roper
23/6/2018
08:15
I was thinking of ways to remove sugar and saturated fat from our diets. Apparently Mid-Staffs is an example of the evils of the state?! Let’s look to laissez-faire America. How’s their opioid-addiction/diabetes/gun-death/suicide stats looking?
blusteradjuster
Chat Pages: 2693  2692  2691  2690  2689  2688  2687  2686  2685  2684  2683  2682  Older
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