Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Jpmorgan Chinese Investment Trust Plc LSE:JMC London Ordinary Share GB0003435012 ORD 25P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 326.00 322.00 326.00 0.00 0.00 - 0.00 00:00:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 0.0 3.5 4.3 75.5 245

Jpmorgan Chinese Investm... Share Discussion Threads

Showing 701 to 723 of 800 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
08/7/2015
12:19
I'd be careful - could well be a deadcat bounce before capitulation. Psychology could play a big part. Remember to check whether Chinese stocks are cheap, not just what percentage they have fallen.
hydrus
08/7/2015
12:17
HSBC is up 2 percent despite having fallen 3 percent earlier...so I believe the Chinese markets will open higher from here ie the bottom...
binladin
08/7/2015
12:00
China's stock market rout gathers strength by Daniel Grote: Violent sell-off in China hits investment trusts, banks and commodities. Analysts warn implications are more serious than a Greek euro exit. The violent sell-off in Chinese stocks has gathered strength, with the country's stock market falling 5.9% and a raft of companies suspending trading in their shares. China investors have continued to dump shares, despite efforts from the country's government to support the market. The country's main stock market, the Shanghai Composite, has now lost nearly a third of its value over the last month. Investment trusts with exposure to the country have taken a hit in morning trading. Fidelity China Special Situations (FCSS) was the biggest faller on the FTSE 250 index, falling 8.7% to 123.8p, while Templeton Emerging Markets (TEMIT), which holds more than two-thirds of its funds in the Asia Pacific region, fell 2.1% to 491.1p. On the FTSE Small Cap index, JPMorgan Chinese (JMC) was the biggest faller, down 5.3% at 157.8p, while trusts with broader Asian exposure were also down. The rout of the Chinese stock market also spilled over into commodity prices, given the country's status as the world's top metals consumer. Miners have survived further fresh falls in today's trading, but were yesterday's big losers as commodity prices hit lows. Some commentators have argued the sell-off represents the bursting of a stock market bubble after China shares had at one point boasted a 150% 12-month return. Jim Reid of Deutsche Bank said China's spectacular stock market collapse threatened more severe consequences than a Greek exit from the euro. 'A freefalling Chinese economy (if it came to that) would be much more important than a "Grexit" for global markets,' he said. 'We're not at that stage yet but if the authorities aren't able to stabilise things soon then there will be collateral damage so this is a crucial story to watch,' he said. 'Expect more intervention to come.' Government support on cards: China's central bank has already pledged to provide more liquidity to the market through state-owned brokers and funds, and delay new companies listing on exchanges, but Tim Condon at ING said more support was likely to be required. Many Chinese investors have borrowed money to invest using 'margin lending' from the stock brokers. Although these were hit by a regulatory clampdown earlier this year the authorities later relaxed the restrictions. However, interest rate cuts last month and a reduction in the amount of reserves banks have to hold were designed to help market stability. Tai Hui, chief market strategist for Asia at JP Morgan Asset Management, said the authorities' response had not been effective: 'the subsequent reversal in its previous attempts of tightening on margin finance, in order to ease liquidity worries, and the joint statement by securities companies to buy CNY120 billion worth of stocks could have not had the desired effect in stabilizing sentiment. 'The suspension of trading for a growing number of companies could have also exacerbated the liquidation of other stocks that are still available for trading,' said Hui. Condon said the government may need to insure investors' debts in order to calm the rout. 'Failure to halt the panic risks damaging the government's image and setting back economic reforms,' he said. 'At this point we believe this may require the government backstopping outstanding margin debt.' Miranda Carr of Banco Espirito Santo agreed further government action was on the cards, stressing the importance of a stable market for economic reform. 'While previously the stock market gyrations were of limited interest to the government and had limited effect on the overall economy, this time it is more serious,' she said. 'The aim of this administration has been to move to a market-based economy, including a market-based cost of capital, which means raising money through bond and equity markets.' 'With this at stake, further government intervention, including monetary easing, such as a broader [interest rate] cut or more [central bank] injections through open market operations, and support from the main government investment institutions (potentially including a market stabilisation fund) is on the cards.' Tai Hui said while it was impossible to say when the sell-off would stop the recent correction had improved valuations which would ultimately support long-term investment. He said the multiple that share prices traded over forecast company earnings had fallen from nearly 20 to 13.3 on the Shanghai Composite index. Meanwhile the more highly valued and technology weighted Shenzhen Composite index had seen its forward P/E (price to earnings) ratio tumble from around 40 to 21.7. By contrast the MSCI China index, which does not include the A-shares that have been the focus of the frenzied buying by domestic investors, trades at a forward P/E of 9.2. 'While it is difficult to draw a line on when this volatility will calm in the near term, there are still merits we see in investing China for the long term, as structural developments such as middle class consumerism, the One Belt One Road initiative and policy drive for environment protection and renewable energy are important investment themes. 'The real estate market is stabilising after 1.5 years of correction, which is good news for developers,' said Hui.
loganair
08/7/2015
10:53
There’s a healthy correction in Chinese stocks, but long-term, the only way is up - Rupert Foster..... The very healthy correction required in Chinese A shares is happening – we are now down 30% from the highs, and I think we have another 5%-10% further to fall. This would unwind the entire move up from earlier this year.
loganair
08/7/2015
09:24
Time to buy in big time....
binladin
08/7/2015
09:13
Need to cover share price from 180-160p...
binladin
08/7/2015
07:50
In away the Chinese stock market is similar to the US in 1929 as many of the local retail investors are invested via Margin Accounts. The initial fall in the Chinese stock market has forced retail investors to Sell their shares in order to cover their margins, which means the stock market falls even further and so on and so no. Margin accounts allow investors to make investments with their broker's money. They act as leverage and can thus magnify gains. But they also magnify losses, and in some cases, a brokerage firm can sell an investor's securities without notification or even sue if the investor does not fulfil a margin call . For these reasons, margin accounts are generally for more sophisticated investors who understand and can handle the risks involved. If the value of the Company XYZ shares drops and the value of the account holdings falls to 25% (the maintenance margin) of the original £5,000 value (or £1.25 per share), the brokerage firm may make a margin call. Within a few days you must deposit more cash or sell some of the shares to offset all or part of the difference between the actual stock price and the maintenance margin. The broker does this because it has lent you £2,500 and wants to mitigate the risk of you defaulting on the loan.
loganair
07/7/2015
15:13
30 percent fall represents a buying opportunity....
binladin
07/7/2015
09:00
Have no fear....the whole years profit is wiped out....therefore a good buy.imo
binladin
07/7/2015
07:37
Should go to 200p. Time to close shorts...
binladin
06/7/2015
10:58
time for a bounce
binladin
06/7/2015
10:21
Reading a report predicting China to grow at a rate 0f 3% to 5% per year from 2020 to 2030 and that Vietnam is where China was in the late 1980's and is a better investment as likely to grow at a rate of 6% pkus per year during the same time period.
loganair
06/7/2015
10:06
150p target now....
binladin
06/7/2015
09:21
Running out of cash and freefall.
binladin
03/7/2015
15:37
China fights to stem bloodshed as market loses another 10% this week: From last November until June 12 the Chinese stockmarket headed towards seventh heaven, more than doubling in size. Yes, doubling. In fact it grew by 110%, but since mid-June the music has stopped and the market has been gripped by feverish volatility, losing more than 40%, with 10% wiped off the books in the past week alone. Money is surging in and out of China, but mostly out, making the walls of prices in Shanghai go red, and the faces of government regulators, who are investigating unidentified “speculators”. With barely a pause the index has crashed from over 5,120 to Friday’s 3,686 in around three weeks, “I think the government measures have been positive, because this is just a lack of confidence. Everybody feels the pressure to stabilise the market. This morning things were more stable, but the afternoon saw another drop, it’s a vicious circle,” says Market Analyst at Haitong Securities Zhang Qi. A slew of policy moves including a cut in interest rates and relaxed margin trading rules has failed to stop the slide, which has had some traders frantically running to stand still, trying to reverse big paper losses.
loganair
03/7/2015
12:27
Average P/E ratio in China is 20. No wonder the stocks are plummeting more pain ahead in my opinion... Chinese banks have ratios of 80 - 90"......expect a freefall to 120p...?.imo
binladin
03/7/2015
12:18
Freefall coming as I I pull money out of China and bring it home...
binladin
03/7/2015
10:39
This will go down on Monday as well...Greece uncertainties
binladin
03/7/2015
10:26
175p today Immenent
binladin
03/7/2015
08:05
The index has fallen 30 percent and jp Morgan has fallen 20 percent another 10 percent fall from here...7 percent fall only today.....
binladin
03/7/2015
08:02
Freefall should go to 150 p...
binladin
02/7/2015
08:31
China’s economic growth has been cooling in recent years, with 2014 marking its slowest GDP growth rate in a quarter century. But that doesn’t signal anything is amiss. It is entirely unsurprising that the world’s second largest economy cannot keep up such a blistering rate of expansion. However, deeper warning signs are starting to emerge. Part of that has to do with the extraordinary run up in China’s stock market over the past year, which is increasingly looking like a bubble starting to pop. The Shanghai Composite, an index of all stocks traded on the Shanghai Stock Exchange, had spiked by 40 percent so far this year and has doubled from mid-2014, and the Shenzhen Composite surged by a jaw dropping 90 percent since the beginning of 2015. But the retreat could be on. China’s Shanghai Composite has plummeted over the past two weeks, falling around 25 percent. Fears that the bubble is popping appear to be spreading. Since June 12, the two exchanges have seen $2 trillion in market capitalization go up in smoke. The government has intervened, cutting interest rates authorizing state pensions to invest in stocks, allowing for nearly $100 billion to flow into the exchanges. That appeared to calm the markets as of June 30, which closed up nearly 5 percent. Despite the rebound, China’s stock exchanges have suddenly been hit by extraordinary volatility – monthly trading volumes exceed six times the value of China’s $10 trillion market cap. The selloff is likely not over yet, and as concerns that the stock market is becoming detached from China’s slowing economy start to sink in, volatility will likely continue. To be sure, the long-term fundamentals for China are compelling. And even in the short-term, the Chinese government could paper over the financial mess, putting a band aid on the problem. It has shown a willingness to actively intervene and further government stimulus in an effort to stop the freefall could inflate prices temporarily.
loganair
30/6/2015
11:08
We might want to consider turning to one of the world’s biggest economies, emerging superpower, and now official sufferer of a bear market. Yes, it’s China. And the turbulence in its markets over the last week or so makes the knock-on effect of Greece’s drama look tame… A bear market takes hold in China: Chinese stock markets have enjoyed spectacular gains over the past year or so. But a correction is well underway now. The Shanghai Composite Index is down by more than 20% since it hit a seven-year high just a few short weeks ago, on 12 June. That means it’s officially in a bear market (20% down is a ‘bear’, 10% down is a ‘correction217;). It’s clear that the government is getting a little worried. The central bank, the People’s Bank of China, cut the one-year lending rate by 0.25% to 4.25% at the weekend. That’s the fourth cut since November. It also reduced the level of reserves banks have to hold. The government has also been using the state media to tell everyone – effectively – ‘it’s safe to get back into the market!’ Apparently, say the regulators, an ‘excessively fast correction’ is not healthy, which suggests they’d be more than ready to intervene if things don’t go their way soon. That might be why the stock market index rebounded sharply this morning to end higher, having swung around wildly during the session. There are reasons for the correction. They range from disappointment that index provider MSCI decided against including the market in its global benchmark index – as yet - earlier this month. There have also been cutbacks on margin lending (the ability to buy stocks with borrowed money). But the pundits are rattled. Morgan Stanley analysts reckon that the market has topped out. And they’re not the only ones. So should we be getting out of China? China is following a well-worn economic path We don’t think so. China was due a correction, no doubt about it. You don’t see indices double in a year (the Shanghai Composite had in fact more than doubled) and expect smooth running from then on in. As Capital Economics put it: “Turnover on the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges was up 400% year-on-year in the second quarter. That rate of growth is clearly unsustainable.”; And it’s probably healthy if it corrects a bit further. But this doesn’t mark an end to the good times, or a lasting bear market. Why not? As professional investor Rupert Foster noted in MoneyWeek magazine a couple of weeks ago, China is following a well-trodden economic pathway – one where the government takes a key role in directing resources in the economy. It’s one that was followed by both Japan and South Korea. And if you look back at their development, what’s happening in China is not that surprising. Japan and South Korea started off with economies driven by government-channelled investment in heavy industry and infrastructure. Same goes for China. During that period, they had their first stock market bubbles. Same happened with China in 2007. Then they transitioned to consumer-driven economies, and in both cases, stock markets returned to their highs, and never looked back. And that’s where China is now. So while it might be a bit of a rollercoaster ride, we don’t think China’s bull market is over yet – not by a long chalk. So if you already own China, hang on. And if you don’t, it’s time to do a bit of homework on how you might want to get exposure when the dust settles.
loganair
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