Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Diverse Income Trust LSE:DIVI London Ordinary Share GB00B65TLW28 ORD 0.1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.50p +0.52% 97.50p 97.50p 99.00p 97.50p 97.50p 97.50p 204,071.00 16:35:13
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 14.4 12.8 3.3 29.3 373.90

Diverse Share Discussion Threads

Showing 351 to 370 of 375 messages
Chat Pages: 15  14  13  12  11  10  9  8  7  6  5  4  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
28/4/2017
16:37
Connect Group (CNCT) 126.5p Year Ending Revenue (£m) Pre-tax (£m) EPS P/E PEG DPS Grth. Div Yield 2017-08-31 1,825.06 54.91 17.77p 7.7 -0.8 -10% 9.80p 7.7% 2018-08-31 1,791.26 58.46 18.77p 7.2 1.3 6% 10.13p 8.0%
aleman
28/4/2017
16:28
Http://www.sharecast.com/news/hsbc-maintains-go-ahead-group-buy-rating-but-cuts-target-price/25628605.html
grupo guitarlumber
28/4/2017
16:10
hxxp://www.sharecast.com/news/hsbc-maintains-go-ahead-group-buy-rating-but-cuts-target-price/25628605.html
aleman
25/4/2017
21:09
Royal Dutch Shell: Dividend Is Safe Apr. 20, 2017 11:55 AM ET| 41 comments| About: Royal Dutch Shell plc (RDS.A), Includes: RDS.B Searching For Value Searching For Value Long/short equity, deep value, value, special situations (378 followers) Summary Royal Dutch Shell's lack of FCF has caused concern among shareholders about whether the high dividend yield is safe. Recently, a lot of improvement has been made, with a strong yoy increase of the production rate. The last two quarters, more than enough FCF was generated to pay its dividends. From now on it appears that the company will see its results improve further. Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) has long been a go-to stock for long term investors. With a current dividend yield of over 7%, the stock seems as attractive as ever to long term investors. But a lack of cash flow along with an uncertain operating environment have been cause for concern among investors about whether the company will be able to keep paying out its current dividend without damaging balance sheet too much. There are definitely risks associated with investing in this stock, but I believe that Royal Dutch Shell is making the right moves to improve its business and keep its dividend safe. Lack of FCF While Royal Dutch Shell has seen a steady uptrend in its dividend per share, its FCF has been lacking for years with an extra difficult time because of the downturn in the energy markets since 2014. As FCF has worsened, the company decided to still improve or maintain its dividend per share. This has caused the company to see a quite negative FCF after cash spent on dividends: While it might keep shareholders somewhat happy, if it goes on for too long more and more shareholders will ask themselves whether the company is not destroying its balance sheet with these actions. I have seen multiple titles on Seeking Alpha stating exactly this, and believing that the dividend yield simply is not sustainable. However, I believe that the company is actually steering in the right direction in terms of generating more and stable cash flows. Lower cost and expenses While Royal Dutch Shell's CFO has declined quite a bit these last few years the same goes for its CAPEX, causing FCF to be fairly close to breakeven. Management has been able to lower its CAPEX thus far that it is currently seeing lower CAPEX for Royall Dutch Shell and BG combined than Royal Dutch Shell had two years earlier on its own. The same goes for the operating cost. An example of the cost cutting efforts are the 6,500 reduction in number of employees. Management had this to say on the matter during the most recent earnings call: "Compared to 2014, and that's including BG, our underlying operating costs have been reduced by $10 billion on an annual basis, and our capital investments have been reduced by $20 billion on an annual basis. end of 2016, we are running the underlying operating cost of the combination of Shell and BG below $40 billion, so that is lower than what we used to run Shell on as a standalone company less than 24 months ago. In 2017, it's expected to be lower again." This lower cost and expenses structure lowers the impact that the troubled energy market has had on the company. But in order to survive and thrive, Royal Dutch Shell needs more than just cost cutting. Raising cash Another way that management is currently trying to improve its financial health is by selling assets. The goal is to raise $30 bln between 2016 and 2018. So far management seems to be very positive about the progress that has been made. $5 bln of the $30 bln has been completed in 2016 with more to come: "We just announced in the last few weeks a further $5 billion, and we are making very significant progress on yet another $5 billion of divestment and then a bit more to come on top of it." Investing in growth Investing in future growth opportunities is also something that Royal Dutch Shell deems to be very important. Despite lower CAPEX, the company is still positioning itself for medium and long term growth. One of the ways that management attempted to achieve this goal was by the acquisition of BG. The integration of BG was completed last year. This acquisition is expected to accelerate the growth strategy in both Deep Water and in LNG. Thus far, BG has improved FCF while creating a platform from which the entire company can be reshaped. Last year BG was FCF positive as expected. From now on this acquisition is expected to see strong growth going forward: "BG was free cash flow positive for us last year. As a result, two years ago we said $2.5 billion. We actually pretty much did that last year in 2016. We now expect $4.5 billion pre-tax basis by 2018, so we did the three-year target in one. And this year in 2017, we should get to around $4 billion for the synergies delivered." Industry conditions Since 2014 a big reason for the company's troubles has been the decline in energy prices. Now that this has been making a comeback since the beginning of next year, the company is already seeing improvements in its current business, with more expected as the oil price remains above $50. The most troublesome thing about this company, according to investors, was whether it could keep paying its dividends because of the low FCF. These past two quarters have actually seen so much improvement that the company was able to pay its dividends from its FCF and still have some cash left. Combined over these two quarters, the company had a positive FCF after dividends of $1.5 bln So we are already seeing that this does not have to be a real problem anymore if the company keeps continuing the same course. Now that the cost and expenses structure has improved along with relatively more stable energy prices, the company can increase its production once again. This is exactly what has happened recently. In the fourth quarter of 2016, a strong 28% yoy increase in production was realized. With this growth, the average daily production rate was 3.9 mln boe. It is expected that this rate will increase to 4.0 mln boe per day in the near future. Conclusion So the company is already FCF positive after its dividends. Now, it is in a position where its operating environment is improving, which will result in even higher cash flows in the future. Therefore I believe that the current high dividend yield of the stock is safe. And because a dividend yield of 7% that is sustainable is more than enough return over the long term, investors should seriously consider buying this stock. Disclosure: I/we have no positions in any stocks mentioned, and no plans to initiate any positions within the next 72 hours. I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it (other than from Seeking Alpha). I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.
waldron
25/4/2017
21:07
Https://seekingalpha.com/article/4063763-royal-dutch-shell-dividend-safe
waldron
17/4/2017
07:17
Do dividends still not lie? (A word to the Weiss) 13:32 17 Feb 2017 Dividends Dividends don't lie, according to investment guru Geraldine Weiss ‘Dividends Don’t Lie: Finding Value in Blue-Chip Stocks” is a well-regarded book by Geraldine Weiss, the former editor of the newsletter, Investment Quality Trends. While the rest of the investment world was focusing on price/earnings ratios – the share price divided by the earnings per share – back in the seventies and eighties Weiss was championing an investment strategy that focused on the dividend yield – dividend as a percentage of share price – of blue chip companies. In particular, she looked for companies with a yield that was close to the top end the historical range, which she regarded as a potential ‘buy’ signal. Likewise, stocks with a yield that was towards the bottom of the range were regarded as overvalued. There were a number of other filters she looked for, many of which we will look at in this article. The book was written in 1990, since when everyone and his dog has gained access to share prices and the computing power to crunch the numbers. In theory, therefore, the chances of a strict application of Weiss’s filters turning up undiscovered gems are practically zero, as the minute any stock falls into buying range, the algorithmic trading automatons at the big investment banks and fund managers should pile in. Instead, we are going to investigate what I have called the Geraldine Weiss Champion Hurdle, applying additional filters as we go along and seeing which ones fall at a particular hurdle, and which ones run on. Hurdle number 1: Does it pay a dividend? There are 967 stocks on the LSE that have a dividend yield, which is to say they paid a dividend in the last 12 months. Excluding venture capital trusts (which are closed-end private equity investment schemes), the highest yielder is Trading Emissions PLC (LON:TRE), the solar power company that is selling off a portion of its Italian solar portfolio and returning cash to shareholders. Valued at just over £5mln, it is no one’s idea of a blue-chip. Of the FTSE 350 stocks, Talktalk Telecom Group PLC (LON:TALK) is the highest yielder at 9.7%. My old mum used to say to me (well, let’s imagine she did for the sake of this article) beware of any stock yielding more than 7%, as it means the market thinks a dividend cut is on the way. Weiss had a filter for sniffing out potential dividend cuts that we’ll get to in a later article, but for information purposes only the other FTSE 350 stocks yielding more than 7% are: Redefine International, Carillion, Pearson, Aberdeen Asset Management, P2P Global Investments, Centamin, Cobham and NEX Group. 2. Is it yielding more than its average yield over the last 10 years? About half of the ‘horses’ fall at this particular hurdle, reducing the field to 499. Of the FTSE 350 runners & riders, Redefine and NEX Group fail to make the cut. 3. Is the yield towards the top end of the historical 10 year range? Restricting the selection to those stocks yielding 1.5 times their 10-year average yield cuts the list to 190 stocks. A number of stocks catch the eye yielding many times their historical average; this can either be a good sign – signifying handsome dividend growth – or a bad sign, signifying the market thinks the divi is not copper-bottomed. In the case of Newmark Security PLC (LON:TCM), for instance, which is yielding 3.3 times its historical average, the signs look positive as the company upped its dividend in 2014 and 2015 and maintained it in 2016, despite issuing a profit warning last year. A bit more digging would be necessary to determine whether Newmark is worth buying, but under Weiss’s system – or at least the parts of it we have applied so far – it might be that the profit warning has battered the share price enough for the stock to be worth pocketing for the dividend. In the case of Fairpoint Group, yielding 5.9 times its historical average, the signs are negative, as the company has signalled it will suspend dividend payments until new management has righted the ship. 4. Does it have a record of growing dividends over the last 10 years? Weiss apparently looked for stocks that had raised dividends at a compound annual rate of at least 10% over the past 12 years. Our data only goes back 10 years, so a compound annual increase of at least 10% over that period equates to an aggregate increase of about 160%. That filter reduces the size of the list to 31 stocks. Oilfield support services firm Petrofac Limited (LON:PFC) was the stock to own over the last 10 years for dividend growth, with the divi up (in sterling terms) from 8.15p in 2007 to 46.87p in 2015/6. 5. Is it selling for two times less than book value? Proving that Weiss was not totally averse to looking at the fundamental value of a company, she liked to filter out stocks that were valued at more than twice their book value (or net asset value, if you prefer). This hurdle knocks another nine runners out of the race, leaving 22. Again, excluding venture capital trusts, the cheapest stock appears to be Pebble Beach Systems Group PLC (LON:PEB), the software and technology company formerly known as Vislink. As the company announced earlier this week it would be restructuring and parting company with its executive chairman after putting out a profit warning earlier this month, it is probably safe to assume this one would not meet Weiss’s definition of a “blue chip company”. 6. Is it trading on an earnings multiple of less than 20? Everyone likes a bargain, and Weiss was apparently no exception, though I am not sure why she chose the cut-off point of a price/earnings ratio of 20. We’re getting down to the nitty-gritty now, with just nine survivors. Screening out venture capital trusts leaves just five, and one of those is Pebble Beach, so in reality we are down to just four companies in what has been more like a steeplechase than a hurdle race. Those four are (drum roll, please): Mitie Group PLC (LON:MTO), Aberdeen Asset Management PLC (LON:ADN), RPS Group PLC (LON:RPS) and UNITE Group PLC (LON:UTG). All of those are worth looking at in more detail and applying a few more of Weiss’s filters, to see whether they make the grade, but that will have to wait for another day.
grupo guitarlumber
17/4/2017
07:13
Http://www.proactiveinvestors.co.uk/columns/stockpot/27556/dividends-don-t-lie-revisited-two-new-ingredients-for-the-pot-but-rps-is-removed-27556.html
grupo guitarlumber
11/4/2017
09:58
Jeffian, Interesting question. The situation for institutional investors is the most important in determining behaviour for listed companies. Assuming that an institution is chargeable to Corporation Tax, dividend income is tax free for the recipient (as the payer is paying out of taxed income). The institutional position is unchanged by the tax change, I think. The tax credit prior to 5/4/16 was just a book-keeping exercise for institutions, with no real effect. Therefore, I do not expect to see a change in dividend paying behaviour for listed companies. For private companies with a few individual shareholders, they (the shareholders)have had a tax increase as you say, but there isn't much they can do about it. Dividends remain the most tax efficient way of distributing income as NI is avoided (both employers and employees contributions). The elephant in the room is entrepreneur's relief. CGT at 10% on a gain of up to £10m. Private company shareholders will be tempted not to distribute profits, but to target an eventual disposal of the business instead. However, it is risky leaving your money to accumulate in a company, potentially exposed to future business risks not to mention all sorts of spurious claims.
leading
11/4/2017
09:23
TXH dividend increased from 7p to 8.5p for a 6.4% yield.
aleman
10/4/2017
12:27
EJ, Well I do my best to exercise what little common sense I have! The trouble is that one cannot anticipate out-of-the-blue tax changes. The principle that dividends, having incurred corporation taxes at source, were paid out with a tax credit seemed ingrained in the system and the Government's argument that lower corporate tax rates justified removing the credit was clearly specious. It was, purely and simply, a tax rise on those perceived to be able to afford it and was also driven by the Treasury's obsession about individuals who incorporate to receive their remuneration as dividends rather than pay. The arbitrary reduction in the 'tax free' allowance from £5k to £2k tells you where this is going. I will also bet you a pound to a penny that the Treasury has a hard look at tax-free ISA income when it realises how large the sums are that many ISA holders have accumulated, so don't get too comfortable with that! Of course I do the things you say but for anyone with significant dividend income outside their ISA's, it is simply not possible to shift the underlying capital into an ISA, even at £20k/year per person. Anyway, my point wasn't so much what to do about it, but whether the decisions that I and others make in this area will impact on the way that companies pay out earnings to shareholders. Maybe they won't pay out at all, and just accumulate cash as some US companies do. I can see the Law Of Unintended Consequences coming into play here - people and companies often don't react to tax changes the way Governments want or expect them to.
jeffian
10/4/2017
06:06
cheers EJ MINES A DOUBLE enjoy your week
maywillow
09/4/2017
22:11
Jeffian. I am not a financial advisor. However, use common sense. Sheltering investments in wrapper such as an ISA has advantage that dividends and Capital gains are not subject to additional taxation. Eberyone has a CGT allowance and it is thus important to use those investments outside ISA wrapper for minimal dividend revenue and maximum capital gain/loss. SIPPS are important to dispose of wealth to children outside IHT rules. Tax is potentially a complex yet simple game where it is important to assess wealth, the asset class, the transfers between spouses, to children and plan for death which is inevitable for all of us. The problem lies always with illiquid assets.... property is a good example.
erogenous jones
09/4/2017
22:11
Jeffian. I am not a financial advisor. However, use common sense. Sheltering investments in wrapper such as an ISA has advantage that dividends and Capital gains are not subject to additional taxation. Eberyone has a CGT allowance and it is thus important to use those investments outside ISA wrapper for minimal dividend revenue and maximum capital gain/loss. SIPPS are important to dispose of wealth to children outside IHT rules. Tax is potentially a complex yet simple game where it is important to assess wealth, the asset class, the transfers between spouses, to children and plan for death which is inevitable for all of us. The problem lies always with illiquid assets.... property is a good example.
erogenous jones
30/3/2017
18:41
jeffian yes it might be wise to rethink especially if interest rates rise substantially and scrip issues become the new norm i know a lot of people in same situation as you in the meantime enjoy may all your dividends increase
sarkasm
30/3/2017
17:27
As someone who is retired and living principally off the dividends on my portfolio, I wonder if the Government's changes to dividend taxation will have any impact on the way companies make payments to shareholders? I'm certainly carrying out a complete review and it may be that share ownership becomes less popular.
jeffian
30/3/2017
13:35
Well, that article should flog a few copies to the gullible. Were Shell to reduce its dividend, the directors would have a very heavy penalty to pay. Unless there is a disaster of the scale of that suffered by BP, the dividend will be one of the last things to be cut. Each cent above $50 oil price is vital. Many oil majors are consolidating their positions and divesting themselves of assets such as tar sands. After all, when the oil price is above $60 then revenues are very healthy. So much so, that it is quite possible for a takeover to be made of the company to whom the tar sands were sold in the first place.
erogenous jones
30/3/2017
13:21
As oil prices falter, fears return on BP and Shell dividends Written by Bloomberg - 30/03/2017 10:58 am Shell news Sign up to our daily newsletter Subscribe TodayPackages from £10 per monthPackages from £10 per month As they guided Europe’s largest oil companies through the industry’s worst slump in two decades, the bosses of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc had a simple message for investors: we’ll protect the dividend at all costs. Not everyone is convinced they’ll be able to keep their word. Even after they raised billions of dollars by cutting costs, selling assets and adding debt, cash is pouring out of both companies in the form of hefty shareholder dividends. Yields on those payments — which fell through 2016 as crude started to recover — have risen this year, typically a signal that investors fear a cut in payouts. “BP and Royal Dutch Shell have unsustainable dividends,” Neil Woodford, head of investment at Woodford Investment Management Ltd. who manages about $20 billion, wrote in a blog. “These companies are liquidating themselves rather than facing up to the need for a dividend cut. The only thing that can save them from that eventuality is a return to sustainably higher oil prices -– something that I think is very unlikely to happen.” BP shelled out $4.6 billion in cash dividends last year, on top of $16 billion in capital spending, according to a presentation last month. It failed to generate enough cash from operations to match that outlay. Shell’s cash also fell short as project spending reached $22 billion and cash dividends $9.7 billion. Related Articles Big Oil debt tops out as cost cuts combine with price rally BP falling behind rivals on breakeven oil price Shell’s record BG deal starts to pay off as production surges While crude rebounded more than 50 percent in 2016, prices have since slid this year as U.S. production and inventories climb. Global benchmark Brent traded at $52.48 a barrel at 2:03 p.m. Singapore time. The price decline has weighed on the shares of Europe’s majors, with London-based BP down 9.5 percent this year and The Hague-based Shell losing 5.4 percent. This week BP’s dividend yield — the annual return divided by the share price — rose to the highest this year. It’s now at 7.1 percent, compared with 6.2 percent at the end of 2016. Shell’s yield has risen to 6.5 percent from 5.9 percent. Payout Priority Dividends from Big Oil have been in the spotlight since crude’s 2014-2015 slump decimated cash and profits. Shell and BP have long deemed the payouts sacrosanct — Shell hasn’t cut its dividend since at least the Second World War — and have increased debt and sold assets to show investors that payments will be maintained. Yet some competitors have caved in. Italian peer Eni SpA capitulated when its dividend yield was 7.2 percent, becoming the first major oil company to reduce its payout in 2015. Spain’s Repsol SA followed, cutting its final 2015 dividend when it was yielding 8.8 percent. The average yield for the U.K. benchmark FTSE 100 index is currently 3.83 percent. Shell Chief Executive Officer Ben van Beurden said earlier this year that free cash flow “more than covered our cash dividend” in the last quarter and “there is no change in the dividend intention.” The company declined to comment beyond that statement this week. BP also declined to comment. In February, CEO Bob Dudley said the dividend remains a top priority and BP is “sustaining and strengthening” the payout. Investors Unconvinced “The companies have spent a lot of time trying to convince shareholders about the dividend but not everyone believes them,” said Iain Armstrong, an analyst at Brewin Dolphin Ltd., which owns BP and Shell shares. “If and when oil goes to $60, people will really start to believe the dividend is safe.” BP’s Dudley has spent most of his six-year tenure divesting assets, but BP went on a spending spree at the end of 2016 — taking in assets around Africa and the Middle East — which will result in a cash shortfall this year if oil stays below $60 a barrel. Both BP and Shell have grappled with debts as they stick doggedly to their dividends. BP’s ratio of net debt to capital rose to 26.8 percent at the end of 2016 from 21.6 percent a year earlier. At Shell, additional borrowing for its $54 billion acquisition of BG Group Plc pushed the ratio to 28 percent at the end of 2016 — more than double the year-earlier level. Total’s Confidence Not all Europe’s oil majors are feeling the same pressure. French peer Total SA said Feb. 9 it should be able to fund operations and cash dividends at $50 a barrel this year — $5 lower than its previous estimate. It also plans to increase its dividend by 1.6 percent after reporting a 45 percent jump in fourth-quarter cash from operations. Total’s dividend yield is 5.3 percent. While indicating increased risk, a high dividend yield can be an opportunity to lock in returns for investors confident that the companies will maintain payouts, Brewin Dolphin’s Armstrong said. For comparison, the return on U.K. benchmark 10-year bonds is 1.16 percent and on Germany’s, 0.35 percent. During the market downturn, Shell, BP and Total have all made use of scrip dividends — offering investors payouts in shares — helping them to preserve cash as they battle to reduce debts. Yet scrip payouts dilute earnings per share and don’t necessarily rule out a dividend reduction if crude remains depressed. “The oil majors are an unattractive investment proposition while the threat of a dividend cut hangs over them,” Woodford said.
sarkasm
27/3/2017
22:40
1st quarter 2017 Announcement date May 4, 2017 Ex-dividend date RDS A ADSs and RDS B ADSs May 17, 2017 Ex-dividend date RDS A and RDS B shares May 18, 2017 Record date May 19, 2017 Scrip reference share price announcement date May 25, 2017 Closing of scrip election and currency election (See Note) June 5, 2017 Pounds sterling and euro equivalents announcement date June 12, 2017 Payment date June 26, 2017 Note Both a different scrip and currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. A different scrip election date may apply to registered and non-registered ADS holders. Registered ADS holders can contact The Bank of New York Mellon for the election deadline that applies. Non-registered ADS holders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. The 2017 interim dividend timetable is also available on www.shell.com/dividend 2nd quarter 2017 Announcement date July 27, 2017 Ex-dividend date RDS A ADSs and RDS B ADSs August 9, 2017 Ex-dividend date RDS A and RDS B shares August 10, 2017 Record date August 11, 2017 Scrip reference share price announcement date August 17, 2017 Closing of scrip election and currency election (See Note) August 25, 2017 Pounds sterling and euro equivalents announcement date September 4, 2017 Payment date September 18, 2017 Note Both a different scrip and currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. A different scrip election date may apply to registered and non-registered ADS holders. Registered ADS holders can contact The Bank of New York Mellon for the election deadline that applies. Non-registered ADS holders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. The 2017 interim dividend timetable is also available on www.shell.com/dividend 3rd quarter 2017 Announcement date November 2, 2017 Ex-dividend date RDS A ADSs and RDS B ADSs November 15, 2017 Ex-dividend date RDS A and RDS B shares November 16, 2017 Record date November 17, 2017 Scrip reference share price announcement date November 23, 2017 Closing of scrip election and currency election (See Note) December 1, 2017 Pounds sterling and euro equivalents announcement date December 7, 2017 Payment date December 20, 2017 Note Both a different scrip and currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. A different scrip election date may apply to registered and non-registered ADS holders. Registered ADS holders can contact The Bank of New York Mellon for the election deadline that applies. Non-registered ADS holders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. The 2017 interim dividend timetable is also available on www.shell.com/dividend
waldron
23/3/2017
17:07
Publié le 23/03/2017 à 16h23 (Boursier.com) — Sous réserve des décisions du Conseil d'administration et de l'Assemblée générale, le calendrier de détachement des acomptes et du solde du dividende relatifs à l'exercice 2018 de Total serait le suivant... - 25 septembre 2018 - 18 décembre 2018 - 19 mars 2019 - 11 juin 2019. Ce calendrier indicatif concerne les dates de détachements relatifs aux actions cotées sur Euronext Paris. Calendrier 2017 Le calendrier de détachement des acomptes et du solde du dividende pour l'exercice 2017 serait le suivant... - 25 septembre 2017 - 19 décembre 2017 - 19 mars 2018 - 11 juin 2018.
waldron
17/3/2017
12:18
credit agricole 11 May 2017 first quarter results 24 May Annual Shareholders’ Meeting 29 May Ex-dividend date 31 May Dividend payment date
grupo guitarlumber
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