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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Comptoir Group Plc LSE:COM London Ordinary Share GB00BYT1L205 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 7.00 6.50 7.50 7.00 6.70 7.00 1,200 08:00:28
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Travel & Leisure 12.5 -8.1 -6.6 - 7

Comptoir Share Discussion Threads

Showing 26 to 46 of 200 messages
Chat Pages: 8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
12/9/2005
10:14
Does anyone know of a commodity fund that includes the soft commodities as well as more talked about oil and metals (Merrill Lynch World Mining) to invest long term in my SIPP. Thanks!
adorling
11/8/2005
20:57
PE OF SIX, SECTOR PE AROUND 20.
torabora
11/8/2005
12:53
Todays Shares magazine; Stock £65m, rents £7m. Stock is at cost, so what is the up to date NAV Per share?
torabora
13/7/2005
13:21
this has a habit of sleeping most of the year and shoot up.. missed it again. ANY IDEAS ON THIS ONE CASH AND DEBT LVLS, SHAREHOLDERS ETC..
latifs100
12/6/2005
09:08
advfn ready for blast off?
maestro.
12/5/2005
19:01
i think the time has arrived,chow..see ya in monte carlo!
maestro.
06/3/2005
07:54
The Sunday Times March 06, 2005 Is it dotcom mania all over again? Five years since the height of the boom, technology stocks look ready to take off again. By David Budworth IT IS five years to the day since the peak in Britain's Techmark index at the height of the dotcom boom, when technology stocks echoed the madness surrounding the South Sea Bubble nearly 300 years ago. Investors who bought into the hype when the bubble was about to burst have had little cause for celebration. On Friday the Techmark, which measures the London market dedicated to technology firms such as Amstrad and ARM Holdings, closed at 1,175, down 80% since the peak of 5,743 on March 6, 2000. Its US counterpart, the Nasdaq, has slumped 59% from its peak to about 2,050. If you had invested £1,000 five years ago in the average tech fund it would now be worth just £257. The same amount invested in the worst-performing scheme, Framlington Netnet, would have shrunk to just £144, according to Lipper Hindsight, a ratings agency. But despite the gloom, advisers are urging investors to take a chance on technology once more, ahead of what they hope will be a sector rebound. Alan Steel of Alan Steel Asset Management, a financial adviser, said: "The sector is at the bottom of the heap, but history shows that that is often the best time to invest. Over the next two years I think a lot of money will be made." Investors are returning to the stock market after a strong start to the year by the FTSE 100 index. Around 58% of experienced private investors are planning to increase their stock- market exposure, according to the Association of Investment Trust Companies. This is up from just 46% six months ago. But in January only £4m was invested in technology unit trusts, making it one of the least popular sectors, according to the Investment Management Association. This opens the door for canny investors to pick up unloved shares before they become popular again. Fund managers and professional investors are also backing technology. Last month Patrick Evershed, who manages the New Star Select Opportunities fund, told The Sunday Times that technology is his favourite sector. Bernard Fairman, who manages technology venture-capital trusts for Foresight Venture Partners, said: "We are in the early stages of an upswing. It feels like the position we were in back in 1995, before the last tech boom really took off." Although some managers and advisers are enthusiastic tech supporters, there is little sign of the late 1990s fever, when investors were happy to pour money into any firm with ".com" in its title, no matter how improbable its business plan and how far off the prospect of profits, let alone dividends. Commentators believe there are sound business reasons to back tech firms now. John Bearman, head of UK equities at Insight, Halifax's fund-management arm, said: "Investors can feel more confident that they are buying sound companies at sensible prices. Normality has returned." Some dotcoms have survived. Lastminute.com and Ebookers.com both made solid businesses out of linking customers to travel services via the internet. Although Ebookers was taken over recently, Lastminute is still thriving. There are positive signs that corporate spending on tech and telephone networks is also growing. US spending on information technology was up 12% last year at $484 billion (£254 billion), the first year of double-digit growth since 2000. But which new developments are the ones to back?
maestro.
06/3/2005
07:53
The Sunday Times March 06, 2005 Is it dotcom mania all over again? Five years since the height of the boom, technology stocks look ready to take off again. By David Budworth IT IS five years to the day since the peak in Britain's Techmark index at the height of the dotcom boom, when technology stocks echoed the madness surrounding the South Sea Bubble nearly 300 years ago. Investors who bought into the hype when the bubble was about to burst have had little cause for celebration. On Friday the Techmark, which measures the London market dedicated to technology firms such as Amstrad and ARM Holdings, closed at 1,175, down 80% since the peak of 5,743 on March 6, 2000. Its US counterpart, the Nasdaq, has slumped 59% from its peak to about 2,050. If you had invested £1,000 five years ago in the average tech fund it would now be worth just £257. The same amount invested in the worst-performing scheme, Framlington Netnet, would have shrunk to just £144, according to Lipper Hindsight, a ratings agency. But despite the gloom, advisers are urging investors to take a chance on technology once more, ahead of what they hope will be a sector rebound. Alan Steel of Alan Steel Asset Management, a financial adviser, said: "The sector is at the bottom of the heap, but history shows that that is often the best time to invest. Over the next two years I think a lot of money will be made." Investors are returning to the stock market after a strong start to the year by the FTSE 100 index. Around 58% of experienced private investors are planning to increase their stock- market exposure, according to the Association of Investment Trust Companies. This is up from just 46% six months ago. But in January only £4m was invested in technology unit trusts, making it one of the least popular sectors, according to the Investment Management Association. This opens the door for canny investors to pick up unloved shares before they become popular again. Fund managers and professional investors are also backing technology. Last month Patrick Evershed, who manages the New Star Select Opportunities fund, told The Sunday Times that technology is his favourite sector. Bernard Fairman, who manages technology venture-capital trusts for Foresight Venture Partners, said: "We are in the early stages of an upswing. It feels like the position we were in back in 1995, before the last tech boom really took off." Although some managers and advisers are enthusiastic tech supporters, there is little sign of the late 1990s fever, when investors were happy to pour money into any firm with ".com" in its title, no matter how improbable its business plan and how far off the prospect of profits, let alone dividends. Commentators believe there are sound business reasons to back tech firms now. John Bearman, head of UK equities at Insight, Halifax's fund-management arm, said: "Investors can feel more confident that they are buying sound companies at sensible prices. Normality has returned." Some dotcoms have survived. Lastminute.com and Ebookers.com both made solid businesses out of linking customers to travel services via the internet. Although Ebookers was taken over recently, Lastminute is still thriving. There are positive signs that corporate spending on tech and telephone networks is also growing. US spending on information technology was up 12% last year at $484 billion (£254 billion), the first year of double-digit growth since 2000. But which new developments are the ones to back?
maestro.
20/1/2005
11:20
krutt,I came up with this late last year,They are the same.
wonder woman
17/1/2005
13:31
Some confusion on the ticker COM is it Comland commercial or Comland communications? are they same or different? Krutt
krutt
02/1/2005
15:50
IF 2nd half is the same as 1st half, ie a pre tax of around 7m. MARKET CAP JUST 16.8million = PE 3.5
wonder woman
19/10/2004
07:52
looks like advfn could blast off today with the latest news...
maestro.
17/10/2004
16:34
FRONT PAGE OF THE BUSINESS...... GOOGLE RESULTS HERALD NEW DOT.COM BOOM FILL YA BOOTS NEXT WEEK OR MISS THE BOAT...YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!
maestro.
19/8/2004
07:02
fill ya boots!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
maestro.
16/8/2004
15:13
FILL YA BOOTS GUYS ...ITS HAPPENING!
maestro.
12/8/2004
23:35
big day tomoro!
maestro.
11/8/2004
00:06
August 11, 2004 Google's £20bn float online and on track From Abigail Rayner in New York GOOGLE shrugged off Wall Street criticism yesterday and fears that its £20 billion float plans would face severe difficulties after hinting that its long-awaited auction could start as early as Friday. The internet search engine said yesterday that potential bidders would have their last chance to register for the auction tomorrow at 5pm New York time. The secretive internet group provided a one-line statement on its website yesterday: "Google IPO – Bidder Registration Closing August 12 2004; Auction Will Commence Soon Thereafter." Investors who still want to buy Google shares are required to sign up for a bidder registration number by visiting www.ipo.google.com. Without a number, individuals cannot take part in the sale. Registration began on July 30. The auction of 25,697,529 shares is expected to start either on Friday or next Monday. It is not yet clear how long the auction will last but industry sources expect that unconditional trading in the shares could begin by the end of the week of August 16. Google had been expected to begin trading as early as the start of this week, but has been delayed by a series of setbacks. On Monday, Google increased the number of shares in the auction by more than a million so that it could hand over the additional shares to Yahoo!, its rival, to settle a lawsuit. In all, Google gave Yahoo! 2.7 million shares worth from $291 million (£158 million) to $365 million, based on Google's price indication. The class A stock settled a patent dispute over technology owned by Overture Services, which was acquired by Yahoo! last year. The patent licence will allow Google to continue to operate its AdWords program, wihch links keywords to adverts. Google has been beset with problems ahead of its impending float. It emerged last week that the company had failed to disclose share allocation to employees over the past three years. The internet search engine admitted that it could have broken US Securities and Exchange rules and securities laws in 18 states for failing to register 23.2 million shares it issued to 1,105 past and current employees and consultants, and stock options to 301 people. Earlier this week, traders were anxious about the potenntial valuation of the flotation, after a report by Jupiter claimed that revenue growth from advertising linked to Google's searches, the company's main source of income, was set to fall dramatically over the next five years. The research, by Nate Elliott, an analyst at the fund management firm, claimed that advertisers are expected to double spending on paid research to $5.5 billion by 2009, but that the annual growth rate will drop to 11 per cent from more than 65 per cent in 2003. "This market has grown so phenomenally over the past number of years. Now it is maturing," Mr Elliott wrote. HOW THIS WEEK'S AUCTION WILL TAKE PLACE Potential investors in Google must sign up for a registration number at the flotation website, ipo.google.com Only "US persons" - US residents and companies incorporated in the US - may apply for stock. Regulators will not take responsibility for the residents of more than one country In response to the completed application form - which requires a US social security number and an e-mail address - a 20-digit registration number is e-mailed to the bidder. Investors must have an account with a broker. When the bidding begins tomorrow, investors will make their bids - they can bid for stock in various amounts. The auction will be similar to an open auction except that bidders will not know what their competitors have bid until after the process has closed. Google has provided guidance of $108-$135 (£59-£73) a share but if underwriters see the price rising 20 per cent above the top end of their range ($162), or below its low end, they will notify investors by e-mail. Bidders will be given an hour to revise or withdraw their bids. If demand for the shares is overwhelming Google could increase the number in the offering. Google has also allowed itself the right to lower the price from that generated by the auction. To do that would mean more winning bidders receiving fewer shares in total. The banks will oversee the auction and decide when to close it. That evening bidders will receive another e-mail telling them the final offering price and, if they have been successful, the number of shares that they have bought.
maestro.
02/8/2004
21:40
Googlemania forces IPO site launch London, August 2 2004, (netimperative) by Gareth Vorster Search giant Google has been forced to launch a site to provide information about its Nasdaq flotation as a result of the massive public interest. The new site enables prospective investors (in the US only) to apply for an identification number so as to register and participate in Google's listing on the Nasdaq. Google expects the auction process to close during the middle of this month. Despite being hit by the latest version of the notorious 'MyDoom' virus last week, which searches the web for e-mail addresses using search engines run by Google, Yahoo, Lycos and Altavista, Google said that money raised by its initial public offering on the Nasdaq could reach as much as $3.3bn (£1.8bn), valuing the company at more than $36bn (£19.7bn). In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Google estimated it would sell its shares for between $108 and $135 through an online auction expected next month. The company is aiming to sell 14.1 million of its own shares, with a further 10.5 million to be sold by existing shareholders. Also last week, the search engine reported second quarter profits of $79.1m, up from $64m in the first. This was from revenues of $700.2m, up 7.5% from $651.6m in the first quarter. Content for the new site includes the entire Google Prospectus, a list of press releases, frequently asked questions about the IPO and instructions for how to participate
maestro.
02/8/2004
21:39
Dotcom boom times return, but with cooler heads London, August 2 2004, (netimperative) by Netimperative staff Happy days are here again. Or at least that's what you might be thinking if two of the latest reports into the technology and Internet business are anything to go by. The first is from Regent Associates, whose 'European Technology Acquisition Review' report reveals that acquisition activity for the first half of 2004 within the technology sector reached levels not seen since the height of the dotcom boom in 2000. The monthly report, which tracks M&A activity across 10 European technology industries, said the actual number of transactions so far this year increased by 68% to a total of 1118 deals, compared to 665 in 2003. Not only that, but deal flow is even increasing quarter on quarter in 2004 with 513 acquisitions in Q1 and 605 in Q2. Commenting on the results, Peter Rowell, chairman, Regent Associates said: "There appears to two very clear catalysts behind this 'acquisition binge'. Firstly the improved financial performance of many of the major companies and secondly, the substantial resources held by the private equity community." However, although the UK is still the largest and most active market in Europe, UK technology acquisitions actually eased by 3% compared to Q1 2004, since the UK is considered ahead of most other economies. The prediction is that activity will ease in continental Europe in the next quarter or two. In particular, the "Electronic Media/ Content" sector leads the 'acquisition binge' with the highest yearly increase in acquisitions, with 229 transactions this year compared to 93 in the equivalent 2003 period, an increase of 146%. Meanwhile, new research by Palo Alto Software, a developer and publisher of business planning software for entrepreneurs, has found that confidence is returning amongst new and young entrepreneurs, with 74 per cent of MBA students intending to set up their own business upon graduating this year. Some 60 per cent of those interviewed will launch their new business online. The research was conducted in June 2004 from an, admittedly rather small, sample of 40 final-year MBA students from courses across the UK. However, they are planning these businesses based on the lessons learnt during the bubble. Students identified the most important lesson they could learn as 'Planning ahead for opportunities and challenges rather than following mad hype'. Tim Berry, CEO and president, Palo Alto Software said: "This research highlights the main characteristic of the new breed of internet entrepreneurs - intelligent caution, which leads me to feel confident about the future success of internet commerce." Right to Reply
maestro.
01/8/2004
01:01
ok m, I understand. Good luck with your trading.
mad4it
01/8/2004
00:22
oi! mad, what about a visit to the ronny threads? Your visit would be very welcome! HTD would be a plus too!
maxk
Chat Pages: 8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
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