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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Bp Plc LSE:BP. London Ordinary Share GB0007980591 $0.25
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  1.45 0.46% 316.85 36,392,713 16:29:59
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
316.95 317.05 318.90 308.85 312.60
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Oil & Gas Producers 134,215.42 -18,203.56 -73.45 64,489
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
17:42:54 O 7,016 316.85 GBX

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Date Time Title Posts
21/6/202118:25 BP95,621
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20/4/202116:06BP - heap of festering tosh........just won't go up!!??30
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15/11/202008:21Deutsche Bank AG Analysts Give BP plc (BP) a GBX 515 Price Target5

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Bp (BP.) Most Recent Trades

Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
17:41:44316.857,01622,230.20O
17:41:25316.60200633.20O
16:48:11316.718052,549.51O
16:46:35310.999,04628,132.25O
16:37:48311.07418,6071,302,177.54O
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Bp (BP.) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
21/6/2021
09:20
Bp Daily Update: Bp Plc is listed in the Oil & Gas Producers sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker BP.. The last closing price for Bp was 315.40p.
Bp Plc has a 4 week average price of 304.60p and a 12 week average price of 289.80p.
The 1 year high share price is 336.95p while the 1 year low share price is currently 188.54p.
There are currently 20,353,021,410 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 68,178,608 shares. The market capitalisation of Bp Plc is £64,488,548,337.59.
10/6/2021
15:21
adrian j boris: masterinvestor Can the Shell and BP share prices recover after underperforming the FTSE 100? By Robert Stephens, CFA 10 June 2021 2 mins. to read Robert Stephens, CFA, discusses the outlook for the UK’s two oil majors after a disappointing year. The performances of BP (LON: BP) and Shell (LON: RDSB) have been hugely disappointing over the past year. While the FTSE 100 index has surged by around 10%, the share prices of the two oil and gas majors are down by 12% apiece. A key reason for their underperformance of the index could be concerns about their reliance on fossil fuels. Covid-19 appears to have accelerated the trend towards cleaner forms of energy, as well as increasing the popularity of ESG investing. Oil and gas prospects However, the prospects for the oil and gas industry may be more positive than the share price performances of Shell and BP would suggest. Certainly, demand for oil and gas will decline over the coming decades, as major economies, including the UK, target net-zero emission targets. However, in the short run, the outlook for oil and gas could be encouraging for two reasons. First, the global economy is widely forecast to deliver strong growth in 2021 and 2022. According to the IMF, it is expected to grow by 6% this year and 4.4% next year. Historically, oil prices have been positively impacted by buoyant economic performance. The asset may even become more popular among investors who are searching for an inflation hedge should economic growth cause a rapid rise in the price level. Second, the adoption of cleaner forms of energy is likely to be an evolutionary process, rather than a revolution. There is no guarantee that current targets, which are ambitious in many cases, will ultimately be met. Indeed, the International Energy Agency (IEA) forecasts that demand for oil will be 4.4% higher in 2026 than it was prior to the pandemic. Alongside this, the shift within the energy sector from fossil fuel to low-carbon assets may mean that the supply of oil is somewhat limited. This could have a positive impact on its price. Attractive valuations Shell and BP have ambitious strategies to pivot towards low-carbon assets over the long run. In reality, the cost, returns and ultimate success of those plans is likely to remain a known unknown for a prolonged period. They could provide investors with high and sustainable returns over coming decades. Or they may leave both companies crippled with high levels of debt and asset bases that offer lower returns than have been previously available via fossil fuel assets. In this latter scenario, the ability of the two companies to deliver dividends or share price growth could be severely limited. However, the valuations of the two stocks suggest that investors are factoring in a period of financial difficulty and risk as they embark on their strategy shift. Shell has a price-to-book ratio of 0.9 and a dividend yield of 3.5%, while BP trades at just a 20% premium to net asset value and offers a dividend yield of 4.8%. These figures suggest that the two stocks offer wide margins of safety that may not reflect their potential to deliver improved financial performance should the oil price rise in the likely global economic recovery. They may also price in a failure to pivot towards low-carbon assets that does not materialise. As such, they could offer good value for money on a risk/reward basis relative to other FTSE 100 stocks in the current bull market.
09/6/2021
17:25
planit2: I thought they would issues an RNS if the buyback was completed. Perhaps there is a small amount outstanding but they have given themselves to the end of June. They are using the buybacks to give money back to investors so they can't have a limit to the buy price. Their commitment was to purchase "at least 60%" of free cash flow this year after the debt level is reached. They can hardly say "we didn't buy any shares because we thought they were too expensive" FCF in the second qtr was expected to be negative due to the horizon payment so they probably are not far off 60% of FCF at the moment for the first 5 months (including the $500m). The last 7 months of the year will need significant buybacks though, enough to move the share price and probably drag up RDSB with it to some extent. Evidence of profit going forwards with the high oil price should also help the share price.
09/6/2021
15:32
marktime1231: By my fingers and toes between 27 Apr and 20 May the total buyback has been just over 115 million shares at prices 302p-310p. So they have spent about £350M which is about $500M at 1.42 cable. The approval was up to $500M, and the mandate seems to have restricted buying to under 310p. If the share price holds up above 320p and continues to rise with strong price and demand for oil the share buyback so far must be considered a success. Not because the buying back has necessarily pushed up the sp, but because the buying price has been at a significant discount to value. How they might conduct a multi-billion buy back in the second half of the year is going to be interesting. If par value is seen to be 350-360p will they limit a buyback programme to that price threshold or just give the brokers feee rein? In the overall scheme of things with a share price likely to continue to rise, sharply if results are super strong, it seems to me they should give the broker(s) a discretionary mandate and get on with it asap. If the share price does rise strongly back towards historic levels it will increase the pressure to improve the dividend. Don't forget that even as demand recovers BP is facing in to an income headwind, because during transition the oil disposal programme outpaces any rise of income from renewables. Looney smartly highlighted the importance of gas prices in his Q1 report, we should perhaps be watching Henry Hub and comparing it to a target of $3 per mmBTU rather than just glorying in how far Brent / WTI stand above the $45 boe benchmark.
26/5/2021
12:53
cocopah: Hi Marktime1231, I heard that report too, hopefully he might even try and do it in Q4 2021. The share price is devoid of direction and I would rather be rewarded (as a long-term holder) with higher dividends. It’s easily affordable and probably more conducive to supporting a higher share price. There is plenty of margin between BPs breakeven price on a barrel of oil and the current price (let alone the price in the next few months). Perhaps they will also try and bring the debt down even more?🤷‍;♂️ 8077;🏻
18/5/2021
21:40
cocopah: In theory share buybacks should work like that but very often the market is already moving the share price in other ways, for example the price of oil or the focus on climate change or which sector of stocks are flavour of the month etc etc. I would much rather have the cash in my hands through divis whilst the above goes on (and pick and choose my sale and purchase activity in the mix). There is no guarantee they are going to move towards (say) £3.50 and above whilst this share buyback activity is happening (indeed the share price has fluctuated up and down a lot whilst they have been doing the buybacks). A stronger divi would probably make the shares more attractive anyway.🤷R05;♂️
06/5/2021
08:31
gwatson56: Did a little reading and below are some interesting statements from the Qtr 1 results , press briefing and the weekly trading conditions update. hTTps://www.bp.com/en/global/corporate/investors/results-and-reporting/trading-conditions-update.html hTTps://www.bp.com/content/dam/bp/business-sites/en/global/corporate/pdfs/investors/bp-first-quarter-2021-results.pdf The Wall Street Journal (27/4/21) “We’ve got a pretty optimistic outlook on buybacks for the remainder of the year but we’re going to do it quarter by quarter,” said BP Chief Executive Bernard Looney. “Depending of course on [the oil] price, I think next year you can very easily imagine a world where our distributions to shareholders are at or above the pre-pandemic levels” Translated in my mind to 1.064B per quarter in Dividend’s and as per above expectation this financial year [reckon from qtr3] 1.064B per quarter on average for buybacks. Note that surplus cash flow @ 60% is after the cost of the $500M in qtr 1. Also note the assumption is the oil price (reckon circa av qtr2 $65 myself) and if Goldman Sachs are right at $80 third quarter then BP have stated for full year 2021 every $1 increase in POO ($50 is their stated expectation) is worth an extra $340M (annual), so that will be the “above” bit… The 2 notes quoted below were within the First Quarter 2021 results. “BP is introducing an intent going forward to offset dilution from vesting of awards under employee share schemes through buybacks. Surplus cash flow* is now defined after the cost of buying back these shares.” “In addition, bp remains committed to returning at least 60% of surplus cash flow to shareholders through share buybacks, subject to maintaining a strong investment grade credit rating.” Translated again from the qtr 1 results $1.7B surplus cash and note the $500M is deducted therefore I reckon the surplus cash war chest is some $1.2B which equates to $720M “60% for shareholders prudently carried forward to qtr2 (assuming no loss to cover).… Well that’s my reckoning…. Moving on I was also interested in the statement’s from the qtr 1 results . “During the first quarter, bp generated surplus cash flow of $1.7 billion after having reached its net debt target of $35billion. During the second quarter, cash flow is expected to be impacted by the $1.2 billion pre-tax annual Gulf of Mexico oil spill payment, further severance payments and a smaller improvement in realized refining margins relative to the quarter to date rise in our RMM*. As a result of these factors we expect a cash flow deficit in the second quarter.” “In the second half of the year bp expects to generate surplus cash flow above an oil price of around $45 per barrel with an RMM of around $13 per barrel and Henry Hub of $3 per mmBtu.” What we need to note is that BP is explicit in stating that qtr2 to qtr4 2021 it uses $50 for Brent. We know that for every $1 over $50 BP generates a additional $340M (annual). RMM and Henry Hub I reckon will be cash neutral qtr2 …so it is a case of doing the maths and you can see why BL is so upbeat.. FWIW I expect BP to again surprise on the upside qtr2 and double the buyback in qtr3. BL reminds me of the smart people at work who greatly under promise and then over deliver ..All in all seems like to me that the share price will be heading north assuming the POO does not tank… imo….
30/4/2021
18:09
waldron: Oil Giants Recover as Prices Rebound -- Update 04/30/2021 | 03:27pm BST By Christopher M. Matthews Big oil companies returned to profitability during the first quarter as they recovered from the unprecedented destruction of oil and gas demand wrought by the coronavirus pandemic. Exxon Mobil Corp. reported $2.7 billion in net income Friday, its first quarterly profit since the pandemic erupted last spring, while Chevron Corp. reported $1.4 billion in first-quarter profit. The results were boosted by rising oil prices during the first months of 2021, as countries around the world soften coronavirus quarantines. The largest European oil companies, BP PLC, Royal Dutch Shell PLC and Total SE, all reported profits earlier in the week after enduring huge losses last year. "That recovery, which we had anticipated happening at some point in time, is happening sooner than we anticipated," Exxon Chief Executive Darren Woods said in an interview Friday. "As economies are reopening and rebounding quicker, in some places, than expected, we are seeing a demand response." Oil companies endured one of their worst years on record in 2020, as Covid-19 lockdowns choked off demand for oil and gas as road and air traffic fell precipitously. Exxon reported its first annual loss in modern history in 2020 of about $22 billion. But cautious optimism has been mounting that global economic activity could return to pre-pandemic levels later this year as vaccines become more widely available around the world. Chevron Chief Financial Officer Pierre Breber said that demand for gasoline and diesel was nearly back to pre-pandemic levels, and that jet fuel is the last remaining overhang, with strong signs that domestic air travel in the U.S. is picking up. "As we look forward, the next couple of quarters look very good," Mr. Breber said in an interview. "We feel good about our ability to generate cash." Chevron's net income was down about 62% from the same quarter last year, but was a substantial increase from a $665 million loss in the previous quarter. Exxon's $2.7 billion profit compared with a $610 million loss a year ago. BP's profit more than tripled from the previous quarter to nearly $4.7 billion, and Shell reported a profit of almost $5.7 billion. Share prices for the world's largest energy companies have moved in tandem with oil prices that have rebounded markedly in recent months. U.S. oil prices are up nearly 80% over the past six months, while the shares of Exxon, Chevron, BP and Shell are collectively up about 65%. On Thursday, U.S. oil prices neared a six-week high of about $65 a barrel but fell around 2.5% in early trading Friday as traders eyed a build in crude and gasoline stockpiles. The share prices of Exxon, Chevron, BP and Shell were collectively down nearly 2% in early trading Friday. The optimism about oil and gas demand rebounding is being tempered by concerns about rapidly rising Covid-19 case numbers in India and South America, said Bjornar Tonhaugen, an analyst at Rystad Energy. Reduced economic activity in India alone may sap as much as 900,000 barrels of oil a day from global demand, according to Rystad. "For the moment optimism is helping prices, but every trader's eyes are on India," Mr. Tonhaugen said. "The oil bulls are out again but it's doubtful that they are having a confident and calm sleep." In response to growing profits, Chevron, BP and Shell boosted their payouts to investors. On Wednesday, Chevron increased its quarterly dividend by 4%, while Shell also raised its dividend 4%, the second increase since slashing it last year. BP said it would buy back $500 million of shares. Total and Exxon held their dividends flat. The weeklong freeze in Texas that left millions without power in February affected profits for many of the companies, which both produce oil in the state and own plants there to convert the hydrocarbons into fuels and plastics. Chevron's refining and chemical units reported $5 million in profits, down from $1.1 billion a year ago, which Chevron CEO Mike Wirth attributed to the February storm and continuing impact of the pandemic. In total, the storm cut about $300 million from its profit, Chevron said. Exxon said the extreme weather reduced earnings by nearly $600 million. Meanwhile, analysts attributed the strong performance of BP's trading unit to its ability to capitalize on substantial price fluctuations during the storm. Despite the improving conditions, Chevron has pledged to keep capital expenditures austere. Mr. Wirth said capital spending decreased 43% from last year during the quarter, citing its corporate restructuring last year that saw as much as 15% of its workforce laid off. Exxon also has pledged fiscal restraint, saying its plan to cut annual capital spending by about 30% remains unchanged. Some investors are deeply skeptical of the industry notwithstanding climbing commodity prices, according to Paul Sankey, an independent oil and gas analyst. Most of the companies' share prices are still trading below their pre-pandemic levels as investors evaluate the firms' plans to navigate tightening global regulations on carbon emissions. Earlier this month, President Biden pledged to cut U.S. emissions by about 50% from 2005 levels by 2030, targeting greenhouse gases from power plants, buildings and the transportation sector. Mr. Woods said Friday that Exxon is engaging with officials on climate policy and has urged the government to set a price on carbon, which it says would spur investment in carbon-reducing technologies. Mr. Sankey said the industry delivered poor results for years from their core oil business before the pandemic, leaving some to doubt they can reap profits from renewable energy or technologies to reduce carbon emissions, which some of the companies have promised to do. "Their track record is not good enough for them to get into a new theme, because they did so poorly on the old one," Mr. Sankey said. Write to Christopher M. Matthews at christopher.matthews@wsj.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires
28/4/2021
16:27
north sea boy: Not sure if I have this correct, but as I understand it, the 500 million buy back is $500 million cash - this equates to circa £360 million Stg. At current prices that will buy approx 119 million shares over an 8 week period. As average volume are around 60m shares traded per day, I don't actually think this is a BIG buyback, AND, as they are being handed back out to employees share schemes, the number of shares in circulation will not actually decrease, and therefore the share price will not increase directly through the buyback? In theory, the direct outcome of the buyback activity (for this quarter) should simply be to avoid further dilution through the issue of "free" shares, and therefore avoid further erosion of current share price. If the share price happily rises during the buyback activity period, then this will either be a happy coincidence, or market reflection of future anticipated fundamentals. Of course, any further buybacks in H2 should in theory allow the shares bought back to be cancelled, and hence increase the net per share value. Not trying to rain on the parade, as I am a longtime (and overweight long) holder, and I think these were an excellent set of results for this quarter. Does anyone have a differing viewpoint on this. Best wishes NSB. (Sorry for duplication with other BP thread, but meant to post this here)
28/4/2021
16:17
north sea boy: Not sure if I have this correct, but as I understand it, the 500 million buy back is $500 million cash - this equates to circa £360 million Stg. At current prices that will buy approx 119 million shares over an 8 week period. As average volume are around 60m shares traded per day, I don't actually think this is a BIG buyback, AND, as they are being handed back out to employees share schemes, the number of shares in circulation will not actually decrease, and therefore the share price will not increase directly through the buyback? In theory, the direct outcome of the buyback activity (for this quarter) should simply be to avoid further dilution through the issue of "free" shares, and therefore avoid further erosion of current share price. If the share price happily rises during the buyback activity period, then this will either be a happy coincidence, or market reflection of future anticipated fundamentals. Of course, any further buybacks in H2 should in theory allow the shares bought back to be cancelled, and hence increase the net per share value. Not trying to rain on the parade, as I am a longtime (and overweight long) holder, and I think these were an excellent set of results for this quarter. Does anyone have a differing viewpoint on this. Best wishes NSB.
28/4/2021
13:04
richvandam: What is the basis of this claim? Everything looks fine on the accounts sheets, the previous quarter issued a profits warning for Q1 this year, this never transpired to be an issue. The 500million buyback began today in small lots and will expire in June, share price should increase in theory. 500million buys is a lot to counter. BP are under pressure from institutions to get the share price back upto the previous levels as they have large pooled holdings at significant losses. This is the route they have chosen to get the share price back to those levels, with the further intent to restore the previous dividend levels once an acceptable dividend yield is established.
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