Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
BHP Billiton LSE:BLT London Ordinary Share GB0000566504 ORD $0.50
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -17.50p -1.34% 1,288.00p 1,285.00p 1,286.00p 1,305.00p 1,278.50p 1,298.00p 12,499,045 16:35:02
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Mining 23,258.8 -5,461.8 -90.3 - 27,203.48

BHP Billiton Share Discussion Threads

Showing 12951 to 12970 of 12975 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
20/7/2017
13:13
So lo g it drives share price to 1400 plus near year high I will be happy
action
20/7/2017
00:50
Somebodys not happy http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2017/07/19/elliott-attacks-disastrous-bhp-billiton-plan-build-potash-mine/
smicker
19/7/2017
19:19
Encouraging outlook by Peter Stephens: Providing an operational review for its full year was resources company BHP Billiton. It was able to meet its production guidance in areas such as petroleum and iron ore. However, copper production was lower than the previous year due in part to industrial action at one of its key assets, as well as unplanned maintenance and power outages elsewhere. However, since the company is relatively diversified, it was able to deliver a strong performance despite the challenges it faced. In fact, the company’s diversification is a major ally for investors. While there are enticing investment opportunities available in the mining and oil & gas sectors at the present time, BHP Billiton offers exposure to a range of commodities which span both industries. Therefore, even if the prices of multiple commodities fall, it may be able to outperform industry rivals on a group basis. This could mean lower risks, which may create more consistent and sustainable shareholder returns. With BHP Billiton trading on a price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of 13.5, it appears to offer upside potential from a rerating. Certainly, the resources sector is a relatively volatile industry in which to invest. However, with a wide margin of safety and diverse asset base, BHP Billiton appears to be a sound buy.
loganair
19/7/2017
19:16
SP Angel - Setting production records in iron ore and in some of the coal operations is testament to management efficiency and control within an existing business, however, we find it interesting that the only mining major new mining project development specifically identified as a major capital project is BHP Billiton’s Jansen potash development and that the primary focus of exploration is on discovering new copper orebodies.
loganair
19/7/2017
15:04
Trading update
action
17/7/2017
20:15
A restart of BHP's Samarco asset in Brazil this year is unlikely, says Investec, due to permitting uncertainties and capital restructuring requirements. Investec sees a 7-10% reduction in forecast earnings over full-year 2018-2019 due to the weakening oil price. As a result, its target price slips by 6% to 1,395p.
loganair
12/7/2017
14:07
Will be selling above 13.5o++
action
11/7/2017
16:19
mid term buy off a double bottom.
rhintintin
11/7/2017
11:35
and don't forget at 1600p Elliott will have sold out his 4% stake.........
anley
10/7/2017
14:07
Thanks Loganair
action
10/7/2017
12:19
Deutsche Bank thinks BHP Billiton likely to see a significant re-rating under new chairman, revamped strategy. As a result, the German bank has upgraded its rating for the FTSE 100-listed firm to ‘buy’ from ‘hold’ with an increased target price of 1,600p, up from 1,400p previously. Deutsche Bank thinks shares in BHP Billiton plc (LON:BLT) are likely to see a significant re-rating under the global miner’s new chairman and revamped strategy. In a note to clients, Deutsche’s analysts pointed out that “BHP has underperformed major global mining peers over the past 3 years”. They said: “A strategy update in May outlining a ‘suite of opportunities’ to grow value by 50% lacked detail and targets in our view.” But, the analysts added: “We have analysed these opportunities and see productivity and automation (US$12b in value) and high returning growth (US$8b) as the most compelling.” They said: “We would like to see a revamped strategy under new Chairman Ken MacKenzie focusing on returns, with targets, which we outline in this report. “We think a sharper focus on returns would create significant value for shareholders.” MacKenzie, who was considered one of Australia's most successful chief executives in his 10 years running Amcor Ltd, will succeed current BHP chairman, Jac Nasser from September 1.
loganair
10/7/2017
10:56
Not quite quit here ....Any one has any views for this stock pls?
action
29/6/2017
14:14
even 'quiet' here
zorija
29/6/2017
14:03
Very quote here
action
23/6/2017
09:47
The BHP Billiton Limited (ASX: BHP) share price was dumped 3% on Wednesday, continuing its recent falls. In just one month, more than $10 billion has been wiped from BHP’s market value. Why? At the end of April, ‘The Big Australian’ released its operational report which showed a fall-off in production in its petroleum and copper businesses. However, that likely doesn’t explain the company’s recent falls. Looking further afield, it’s easy to see that the issues crippling its share price most likely stem from falling commodity prices. In May, here’s how the prices of BHP’s key commodities moved: Iron ore – down 13% Copper – down 1.5% WTI Crude – down 5% Thermal Coal – down 11% Oil, which accounts for a huge chunk of BHP’s business, has continued to fall since May. It’s fallen from $US48.36 to just $US42.62 per barrel, according to Bloomberg. In other words, it’s down a further 12%.
loganair
16/6/2017
09:42
BHP Billiton names packaging boss Ken MacKenzie to tricky job as new chairman MacKenzie, who was considered one of Australia's most successful chief executives in his 10 years running Amcor Ltd, will succeed current BHP chairman, Jac Nasser from September 1. In a statement, Elliott said it supported the appointment of MacKenzie as a "constructive step in bringing much needed change to the direction of BHP."
loganair
16/6/2017
09:39
BHP Billiton's new chairman should "review" and "upgrade" the mining group's board of directors, activist investor Elliott Management has demanded, citing the backing of several other major shareholders. With chairman Jac Nasser retiring and a new chairman expected to be announced imminently, the activist investor, which blamed management for "destroying tens of billions of dollars in shareholder wealth" from its expansion into the US petroleum business and share buybacks "at inflated prices", said the new appointee should "reconstitute and refresh the BHP board of directors". "BHP has an entrenched board, with long-tenured directors having approved the disastrous acquisitions and poorly timed share buybacks that are at the root of much of today's underperformance," the New York hedge fund said in an open letter. "A significant upgrade in directors is needed." Although chief executive Andrew Mackenzie, who held talks with Elliott last month, has stressed his confidence in boosting the value of the company by up to 50% and near-doubling the return on capital through cutting costs and carefully managing assets, Elliott remains unsatisfied and has continued to keep up the pressure. The letter cited soundbites from other major shareholders in recent weeks, including Australia's AMP Capital calling for an "independent assessment" on the decision unify BHP's legacy dual-listed company structure, Aberdeen Asset Management calling for a "refreshing of the board", and Tribeca for the new chairman to "reset the culture to one that covets capital efficiency and earnings per share growth". Elliott wants the new appointment to have the mandate to initiate an independent review of the petroleum business and explore a potential sale of the US oil and gas operations; "unlock" BHP's $10bn franking credit balance through a unification of the dual-listing while maintaining BHP's Australian domicile, listing and headquarters; and develop a new capital return plan that prioritises shareholder returns.
loganair
07/6/2017
08:18
Does any one have date for july17 update pls
action
02/6/2017
08:57
What BHP Billiton Limited Investors Need to Know About the Future: In April, Elliott Management urged BHP Billiton to spin off its oil drilling business. It's a high-profile fight in the mining industry that could have a material impact on BHP's corporate outlook and performance. But you can't look at this proposal in isolation because BHP Billiton has meaningfully transformed itself over the past three years. Way back when: BHP Billiton didn't become BHP Billiton until 2001. That was when Broken Hill Properties (it changed its name to BHP Limited in 2000) and Billiton merged. The purpose was to create a diversified mining giant, with exposure to commodities including iron ore, coal, oil, aluminum, copper, nickel, manganese, and chrome. The idea that bigger was better in commodities worked reasonably well through the first decade of the new millennia. The driving force was demand out of fast-growing China. And then, in 2011, something changed. Commodity prices across the board started to move lower. At the same time, expansion projects made when prices were heading higher were beginning to come online, adding extra supply at exactly the wrong time. Miners across the globe found themselves in financial difficulty. BHP was no different. The one commodity that notably held up for a spell was oil, which didn't start to head materially lower until mid-2014. Cost-cutting and pulling back on growth projects, where possible, was the new normal. But BHP decided to go a step further: It spun off South32 in fiscal 2015. This new company took on all or part of BHP's alumina, aluminum, thermal coal, manganese, nickel, silver, lead and zinc businesses. Mostly it pulled apart what was created when Broken Hill Properties and Billiton merged in 2001, leaving BHP to focus on iron ore, copper, metallurgical coal, and oil. There was cost-cutting, too: While the South32 spinoff is the enormous change over the last three years, the company's cost-cutting efforts shouldn't go unnoticed. After adjusting for the spinoff, BHP's capital spending went from a touch over $16 billion in fiscal 2014 to roughly $7.7 billion in 2016, a drop of around 50%. In fact, capital spending was even higher than that in fiscal 2013 at $22.4 billion -- putting the total decline through 2016 at 65% over four years. That, however, wasn't the only place BHP Billiton was saving money. It also managed to trim its wage and salary expenses by nearly 30% between fiscal 2014 and 2016. In other words, BHP's management team was working hard to adjust to a very different market environment. And it apparently thought its collection of assets was a good foundation for the future, or it would have only shoved more into South32. Doing nothing: That brings us to early 2017, when Elliott Management started a public push to get BHP Billiton to increase shareholder value through a trio of actions, notably including that split off its oil business. When BHP pushed back, basically suggesting that it had already made significant changes and wanted to give its approach more time to play out, Elliott accused the company of taking a 'do nothing approach' to its suggestions. Oil is a big part of BHP Billiton's long-term plan. If you look at the history, however, BHP has a point. It's hardly been sitting still, and the spin-off of South32 is still quite fresh. Moreover, the oil business has historically been one of its most high-margin business units. Getting rid of all of the oil division doesn't seem like it will make BHP a better company over the long term, even if it results in a short-term boost for shareholders. A changing giant: If you are looking for short-term gains, then Elliott's push for change might appeal to you. However, BHP has been working hard to adjust its business to better compete today and in the future. Oil is expected to be a big part of that. For long-term investors, it seems more prudent to give the already massive changes that have occurred time to play out. BHP Billiton has changed a lot over the last three years, so it's smart to take a breather.
loganair
24/5/2017
09:27
Unfortunately, Fayetteville has acted as a burden for BHP since it was acquired by the miner in February 2011 for US$4.75 billion. It contributed negative US$134 million to BHP’s underlying earnings (EBIT) in the 2016 financial year, based on revenue of US$246 million, while it was also charged with a US$1.91 billion impairment for the year. It had net operating assets of US$919 million as at the end of December 2016. Indeed, much of this has been caused by lower oil prices, which crashed between mid-2014 and early-2016. They have rebounded in the time since which could allow BHP to realise a higher price on a sale, should it follow through with its plans.
loganair
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