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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Standard Life Aberdeen Plc LSE:SLA London Ordinary Share GB00BF8Q6K64 ORD 13 61/63P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -0.80 -0.38% 208.90 7,329,530 16:35:21
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
208.00 208.20 211.50 205.80 211.10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Financial 3,993.00 243.00 11.20 18.7 4,707
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
17:46:10 O 3,130 208.525 GBX

Standard Life Aberdeen (SLA) Latest News (6)

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Date Time Title Posts
25/9/202008:21Standard Life SLA2,389
25/9/202007:59Standard Life Aberdeen PLC278
06/4/202014:06Standard Life Thread Post AAM Merger32
04/4/202011:23Standard Life Aberdeen pension fund, trading without SIPP6
11/12/201810:25Profit Warning ? Market Cap loss Ј 5.5 billion ++-

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DateSubject
26/9/2020
09:20
Standard Life Aberdeen Daily Update: Standard Life Aberdeen Plc is listed in the General Financial sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker SLA. The last closing price for Standard Life Aberdeen was 209.70p.
Standard Life Aberdeen Plc has a 4 week average price of 205.80p and a 12 week average price of 205.80p.
The 1 year high share price is 338.20p while the 1 year low share price is currently 170.30p.
There are currently 2,253,362,623 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 9,297,065 shares. The market capitalisation of Standard Life Aberdeen Plc is £4,707,274,519.45.
23/9/2020
11:33
spud: https://www.cmcmarkets.com/en-gb/opto/sector-spotlight-legal-and-general-avivastandard-lifes-share-prices Shares in insurance companies are holding firm despite a high court ruling this month that they could have to pay out thousands. In the judgement, the court ruled that some insurers would have to pay out to businesses claiming business interruption due to the pandemic. However, as City AM reports, investors in Legal and General [LGEN], Aviva [AV] and Standard Life [SLA] “shook off the ruling”. What’s more remarkable is that many had predicted the insurance sector would be one of the hardest hit by the outbreak, paying out on both business and life insurance policies. Yet, while half-year profits have seen sharp falls, the sector seems resilient. Unlike banking, which has seen share prices suppressed since the outbreak, insurers have by and large managed to claw back some losses. So, what’s the outlook for heavyweights Legal and General, Aviva and Standard Life’s share prices for the rest of the year? Legal and General’s share price While Legal and General’s share price has been on a downward trajectory since mid-August, it's still lightyears above the 138.6p it was trading at on 23 March. Causing the late summer slip were first-half pre-tax profits of £285m, a steep 73% drop from the same period last year. Weighing on earnings were historically low-interest rates and payouts on life insurance policies, both due to the coronavirus. £285MILLION LEGAL & GENERAL'S HALF-YEAR PRE-TAX PROFITS - A 73% YOY DECLINE Still, that didn't stop Legal and General from paying out a 4.93p per share first-half dividend. While that's less than some analysts were expecting, considering that the regulator has been pressuring insurers to freeze payouts to shore up capital, it’s better than nothing. For income-seeking investors, some analysts reckon dividends will be back to strength sooner rather than later. Gordon Aitken, an analyst at RBC Capital Markets, said: “We see this dividend caution as merely temporary and not an indication that dividend growth will slow.” Among the analysts tracking the stock, Legal and General's share price carries a 288.79p price target, which would see a 59.6% upside on 21 September’s closing price if hit. “We see this dividend caution as merely temporary and not an indication that dividend growth will slow” - Gordon Aitken, RBC Capital Markets analyst Aviva’s share price Two months into the job and Aviva's new CEO Amanda Blanc has picked up £1m worth of the insurer's stock. Picking up 324,887 Aviva shares at just over 300p certainly shows self-belief in her own turnaround strategy. Having replaced Maurice Tulloch in the top spot after the former CEO resigned for family health reasons, Blanc has the task of turning around Aviva's share price, which has fallen 30% since the start of the year. 30% AVIVA'S YTD SHARE PRICE DROP To do this, Blanc has pledged to focus on Aviva’s core UK, Ireland and Canada markets, while reducing its European and Asian operations. Already Blanc has overseen the sale of Aviva's Singapore operations to Singapore Life for $1.98bn in one of the biggest insurance deals in Southeast Asia. “The sale of Aviva Singapore is a significant first step in our new strategy to bring greater focus to Aviva’s portfolio,” said Blanc. The deal also got the blessing from analysts at Jefferies, who described it as constituting “exceptional value creation” for Aviva, while commending Blanc for showing “decisive action”. So, a promising start from the new CEO, with the possibility of having picked up Aviva’s share price at a bargain? Analysts tracking the stock on Yahoo Finance have a 551.33p average price target. Hitting this would see an impressive 95.3% upside on Aviva’s current share price (as of 21 September’s close). “The sale of Aviva Singapore is a significant first step in our new strategy to bring greater focus to Aviva’s portfolio” - Aviva's new CEO Amanda Blanc Standard Life Aberdeen’s share price Like Aviva, Standard Life’s share price has seen a steep drop off since the start of the year, followed by a mild recovery since the start of the pandemic. In half-year results, adjusted pre-tax profit came in at £195m, down 30% from the £280m seen in the same period last year. The sharp downturn in profit can be notched up to both the coronavirus and the loss of its business with Lloyds bank. In total, net withdrawals came in at £24.8bn, causing fee revenue to drop 13%. Despite the losses, Standard Life rewarded shareholders with a 7.3p interim dividend. £195MILLION STANDARD LIFE'S HALF-YEAR PRE-TAX PROFITS - A 30% YOY DECLINE Presiding over his last set of results, the outgoing CEO Keith Skeoch commented that “the long-term consequences of the crisis will be profound,” and predicted that any economic recovery would be W-shaped without a vaccine. While that struck a gloomy chord, Standard Life actually saw overall outflows slow, excluding the withdrawal paid to Lloyds. If the asset manager continues to reduce outflows, Standard Life’s share price may have already been through the worst. Analysts have pinned a 380.07p average target on Standard Life’s share price, which would see a 75% gain on the current share price (through 21 September’s close). spud
21/8/2020
08:01
mcunliffe1: There haven't been many days other than nasty of late Salty. No matter how much of our money this company spends on share buy-backs, paying-off old CEO's, saying "hello" generously to new CEO's and F.D.'s the share price seems mired. It's am unglamorous outfit in all respects and until that changes and good news starts to appear I cannot see the situation changing. I recently posted (on the other thread I think) the comparison between SLA and Hargreaves Lansdown in respect of inward investment: HL - £7,700m SLA - £ 100m For the 12months to 30June2020. That's why the SLA share price is languishing IMO.
03/8/2020
00:28
mcunliffe1: Wanting to check the progress (or lack therein) of my pension, I log on to the SLA site to be shocked by the headline value of my pension. It's lost several thousand over the past couple of days. A closer inspection shows the following statement: "At this time, the above values do not include any adjustments or bonuses." No explanation why. No confirmation when this may change. Hence, accurate valuation. THIS is part of the reason SLA share price is sh*t. The management care little for the customer; their level of disrespect is unacceptable. This has been the case for several years and I suspect it will not improve.
27/3/2020
15:33
mcunliffe1: I posted this a couple of days ago on the Chinese Investor thread Spud: I've been keeping an eye on the SLA share buyback program lately. I find it fascinating there's little adjustment to the buying pattern given the wide swings in the share price - particularly downwards of late. For example, back in mid Feb. they purchased about 618,000 shares at about 323p each on average. This average price fell throughout Feb. to around 272p and to be fair, the number of shares purchased increased towards 1.5m at that time. So they spent double the amount of real cash at the end of Feb. compared to mid. Feb. More recently however, the avg. share price has been around 207p on 17Mar, 191p on 18th, 180 on 19th, 195 on the 20th and 177 on the 23rd. This is the pattern: Date Qty Avg. Price £ spent ------------------------------------------------ 16Mar 2.5m 190p 4.75m 17Mar 0.785m 207p 1.63m 18Mar 2.05m 191p 3.92m 19Mar 1.88m 180p 3.38m 20Mar 2.63m 195p 5.13m 23Mar 2.08m 178p 3.68m 24Mar 0.791m 187p 1.48m 25Mar no reported purchases 26Mar no reported purchases I'm struggling to see a pattern whereby more shares are purchased as the price is falling and less when it's rising (apart from a very small qty purchased on 17th March). I appreciate hindsight is wonderful but I'm depressed to think they've spent about £4m a day buying often at prices above £3 a share. The quantity ultimately cancelled is such a miniscule proportion of the total quantity still issued. Can this really have been beneficial?
24/3/2020
16:45
mcunliffe1: I love your optimism C.I. I've been keeping an eye on the SLA share buyback program lately. I find it fascinating there's little adjustment to the buying pattern given the wide swings in the share price - particularly downwards of late. For example, back in mid Feb. they purchased about 618,000 shares at about 323p each on average. This average price fell throughout Feb. to around 272p and to be fair, the number of shares purchased increased towards 1.5m at that time. So they spent double the amount of real cash at the end of Feb. compared to mid. Feb. More recently however, the avg. share price has been around 207p on 17Mar, 191p on 18th, 180 on 19th, 195 on the 20th and 177 on the 23rd. This is the pattern: Date Qty Avg. Price £ spent ------------------------------------------------ 16Mar 2.5m 190p 4.75m 17Mar 0.785m 207p 1.63m 18Mar 2.05m 191p 3.92m 19Mar 1.88m 180p 3.38m 20Mar 2.63m 195p 5.13m 23Mar 2.08m 178p 3.68m I'm struggling to see a pattern whereby more shares are purchased as the price is falling and less when it's rising (apart from a very small qty purchased on 17th March). I appreciate hindsight is wonderful but I'm depressed to think they've spent about £4m a day buying often at prices above £3 a share. The quantity ultimately cancelled is such a miniscule proportion of the total quantity still issued. Can this really have been beneficial?
01/3/2019
09:21
kenmitch: Agree why Directors prefer buybacks, even when (as with SLA buybacks) they prove a waste of money unless done at a bargain price. But Companies like SLA are also very reluctant to cut the dividend. Cut the dividend and Income Funds can want to sell.... which puts further pressure on the share price in addition to the downside from the dividend cut itself. From the small investors point of view special dividends when they can be afforded, on top of the ordinary dividends, work FAR better than buybacks. BIG SLA share price fall since they started buying back shows that so clearly. It's simple. With buybacks investors don't receive ANY money but with special dividends they do and they can do what they like with it. Whereas buybacks work best for the Directors as if their bonus pay is linked to eps, then buybacks mean eps will be higher than it would have been without buybacks. Many private investors AND PROFESSIONAL COMMENTATORS just swallow the nonsense that buybacks "reward investors." They don't. But they often reward Directors. No wonder so many Companies go for them.
21/11/2018
11:32
kenmitch: Buybacks don't support the share price. Look no further than Apple. They are spending $100 BILLION on buybacks this year. That hasn't stopped the share price falling by over 20% in recent weeks. Nor have the SLA buybacks supported the SLA share price. Buybacks DO mean eps will be higher than it otherwise would have been. Directors often like buybacks when their bonus pay is linked to eps! And fewer shares in issue does make it less costly to pay dividends on the remaining shares. Buybacks also reward those who want out, as there is a willing buyer. They gain at the expense of those who stay invested. So buybacks DO reward investors, but often NOT the ones who stay invested! I discovered that years ago and now invest accordingly. e.g sold out of SLA when they started buying back (above £4) but bought back (too soon?) on Monday as so much bad news now looks priced in, and the dividend if maintained is too good to miss. Also some of the things investors don't like about SLA like dual management are very easy to fix.
13/8/2018
17:39
kenmitch: Pierre Oreilly I hope you realise that my replies are simply in response to your inaccurate "facts" and are not aimed at you personally. You might be the salt of the earth! BUT the most dangerous posters on ADVFN bulletin boards are not the complete idiots who wreck some threads (e.g Tern) and not worth replying to, but those whose posts give the impression they know what they are talking about when they don't. MCunliffe1 has pointed out some of your mistakes and inconsistencies in the post above this one, so I'll leave most of those to him. And so did scrawl in his excellent reply. Your last reply and previous posts show basic misconceptions or factual errors:- 1. e.g you started by posting that as most people voted for it that's what they wanted. True!! But that doesn't then mean that decision was the right one. e.g The majority voted for Brexit and for Trump. Time will tell (and I'm NOT starting a debate on that!) whether those were good decisions. The majority might vote for something that turns out to be a disaster. Company history is littered with terrible aqusisitions that were voted for at the time that ended up either bankrupting that Company or nearly doing so. 2. In post 649 you wrote;- "unassailably , a buyback increases the price from what it would otherwise have been. If it would have dropped 50p without the buyback then withe the buyback it may only drop 20p for example." That's tosh! Do you really think that before a share is priced a computer or whoever/whatever calculates a share price to take account of perhaps daily buybacks? Impossible. If you want the facts read scrawl's reply again. He explains correctly, as I have too, that YES, buybacks DO mean higher eps than would otherwise have been the case. BUT higher eps does not always mean a higher share price. If news is bad, or profits disappoint, or there are more selling than buying then the share price will drop and again no way are buybacks factored in before the price is marked down. 3. Again a simple factual error and this time from not reading a post carefully. You wrote:_ "I think pointing out a share which had a buyback and subsequently fallen in price as proof they are a poor way of returning cash massively misses the point." That's not what I wrote! I gave examples where that had happened. I could also give examples where a share had done very well after buybacks. I was trying and failing to get you to understand that buybacks do not automatically mean a higher share price than if they hadn't bought back. 4. And as for your "I should have complained to the Board and too late to be whinging now comment," again you have misunderstood. I don't currently hold SLA having sold soon after their merger. I AM now tempted thanks to the much lower share price along with a very attractive dividend (and looked here to see if any useful information). I've made clear that though I prefer dividends to buybacks there are plus points for buybacks too. And I used NEXT as an example of plus and minus points. e.g Next have now bought back more than half their shares and for anyone looking to buy NEXT after the big share price drop instead of holding on during it the share was so tempting at £38 that I jumped in then. With 50% fewer shares in issue NEXT can afford to pay higher dividends on the shares remaining. So I'm happy to accept further NEXT buybacks now as I would be if and when deciding to buy SLA. Finally have you read any detailed research on buybacks? Your inaccurate and confused posts suggest strongly not? e.g admittedly a few years ago, detailed research from Morgan Stanley showing how the share prices of Companies buying back subsequently underperformed those in the sector who did not buy back. That doesn't mean all buybacks or wrong nor that it is always better to have dividends. It's all a matter of opinion but it helps when posting your opinions here if you have some knowledge about the topic you are posting about.
13/8/2018
12:52
kenmitch: In case anyone is wondering about buybacks. I don't like them and much prefer dividends, but that's by the way. Buybacks do not always mean a higher share price. If they did investors would always win if only buying shares in companies buying back. Yes they are always referred to as "a return to shareholders" but that doesn't necessarily mean that shareholders are rewarded. Indeed there is a lot of evidence to show that buybacks reward those who want out as there is a ready buyer (the Company) at the expense of those who stay. A couple of examples and these are facts and not opinions. 1. NEXT. It is widely accepted that Next are the bellwether for how to do buybacks. They ONLY buy back when thinking the shares are good value. If not confident on that score they go for special dividends instead. BUT despite that sensible approach to buybacks (unlike many Compannies who buyback regardless or not of whether share looks fully or even overpriced) NEXT bought back heavily AHEAD of what turned out to be a big share price fall from £80 to £36. So those rewarded by those buybacks were not those who stayed with NEXT but those who got out ahead of the falls and big investors who were able to sell in size thanks to NEXT being happy to take their shares off them. 2. Many companies have seen big share price falls even when buying back heavily and while buying back nearly every day. e.g MAN share price crashed while they were buying back. e.g BP spent £30 billion on buybacks and their share fell heavily after then and then fell even further after the Gulf of Mexico disaster. The money they spent on buybacks could have covered most of the compensation bill. Is SLA buying back going to see a guaranteed increase in the share price? NO. BUT a big plus is that at least SLA are buying back while the shares look to be good value so for those who like buybacks there is a stronger case for SLA buying back than for those Companies who buyback even when share looks very overvalued. Why are Directors so keen on buybacks? Partly because buybacks DO guarantee higher eps than would have been the case without buying back. And Director bonus pay is often based on eps. Have posted this as a one off in case anyone is interested in a few basic bits of information ahead of ill informed rubbish. There are strong points for buybacks and strong points against them. I prefer dividends because with dividends we always get the money and that is not the case when I am supposedly "rewarded" with a buyback IF the share price goes and stays lower.
07/8/2018
09:45
speedsgh: Numis sees ‘deep value’ in Standard Life Aberdeen - HTTP://citywire.co.uk/money/the-expert-view-hsbc-tesco-and-william-hill/a1144545#i=5 The market is undervaluing Standard Life Aberdeen (SLA) especially after the successful flotation of its Indian joint venture business HDFC Asset Management Company, says Numis. Analyst David McCann retained his ‘buy’ recommendation and target price of 433p on Standard Life Aberdeen after oversubscribed shares in HDFC went to a c.65% premium, implying value of 50p per share for SLA shareholders, far above Numis’ last published valuation of 28p. ‘Back of the envelope, at SLA’s current share price of 308p, we calculate this means the market value of SLA’s investments at live prices and capital returns/current year dividends alone nearly explain the whole SLA share price,’ he said. ‘We believe this highlights the deep value opportunity for patient investors.’ McCann added that the market was ‘materially undervaluing SLA and we believe it offers a significant value opportunity’. The shares were flat at 308.1p yesterday.
Standard Life Aberdeen share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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