Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Royal Dutch Shell Plc LSE:RDSB London Ordinary Share GB00B03MM408 'B' ORD EUR0.07
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -2.50 -0.11% 2,253.00 1,444,811 11:01:02
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
2,253.00 2,253.50 2,274.00 2,244.00 2,255.00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Oil & Gas Producers 304,394.43 27,932.56 221.13 10.2 84,386
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
11:01:02 AT 98 2,253.00 GBX

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Date Time Title Posts
16/10/201910:39Royal Dutch Shell7,806
04/10/201907:33Shell versus BP7,166
26/7/201812:55Royal Dutch Shell (RDSB) One to Watch 1
12/5/201711:47EX DIVIDEND DATE IS 15th May, 2017-
04/1/201714:16Shell - Cheap as Chips94

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Royal Dutch Shell (RDSB) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
16/10/2019
09:20
Royal Dutch Shell Daily Update: Royal Dutch Shell Plc is listed in the Oil & Gas Producers sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker RDSB. The last closing price for Royal Dutch Shell was 2,255.50p.
Royal Dutch Shell Plc has a 4 week average price of 2,244p and a 12 week average price of 2,234.50p.
The 1 year high share price is 2,647p while the 1 year low share price is currently 2,227p.
There are currently 3,745,486,731 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 4,797,579 shares. The market capitalisation of Royal Dutch Shell Plc is £84,367,088,615.78.
30/9/2019
08:07
florenceorbis: Investomania Shell share price: 3 reasons why I’m optimistic about LON:RDSB’s prospects I think Royal Dutch Shell Plc (LON:RDSB) (RDSB.L) could deliver a rising share price in the long run September 30, 2019 Robert Stephens, CFA The performance of the Shell (LON:RDSB) share price has been mixed of late. In my opinion, countering forces have been responsible for heightened volatility in the oil and gas sector. The growth prospects of the world economy may have been brought into question by the ongoing trade war between the US and China. At the same time, geopolitical challenges involving Saudi Arabia may have had a positive impact on the oil price. In the short term, it wouldn’t surprise me if the interaction between demand and supply growth in the oil and gas industry remains difficult to accurately predict. This may lead to a volatile performance for the LON:RDSB share price. In my view, however, Shell could offer a bright long-term future. There are a few reasons for this. Its strategy is one of them. I feel that the company is pursuing a sound overall strategy that could see its asset base shrink in size, with it expected to offload assets over the medium term. It is also expected to attempt to reduce debt, which I feel could be a sound move at a time when the prospects for the wider industry are uncertain. I’m also optimistic about LON:RDSB’s future because of its valuation. It has a P/E ratio of around 12.7, which I think could undervalue its long-term growth prospects. Its yield of 6.3% is also attractive in my eyes. Furthermore, I believe that the oil and gas industry may have a better long-term future than its valuation suggests. With electric vehicles expected to make up around 30% of total vehicle sales across the world by 2030, I expect petrol and diesel-powered cars to remain dominant in the wider industry. This could mean that Shell enjoys stronger trading conditions that its share price suggests, and that it may produce improving financial performance that translates into capital growth.
28/8/2019
07:44
waldron: investomania Can the Royal Dutch Shell Plc share price beat the FTSE 100? Does Royal Dutch Shell Plc (LON:RDSB) (RDSB.L) offer bright share price prospects compared to the FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX)? August 28, 2019 Robert Stephens, CFA Shell (LON:RDSB) Shell The outlook for the Royal Dutch Shell Plc (LON:RDSB) (RDSB.L) share price continues to be relatively uncertain in my view. The prospects for the oil price are difficult to determine just now, with risks to the global economic growth outlook potentially being counteracted by the possibility of geopolitical risks that ultimately cause undersupply. Therefore, there could be a case made for a rise or fall in the oil price over the near term. As a result, I expect there to be relatively high volatility which could cause the Shell share price to experience a period of uncertainty in the short run. That said, I feel that the business has a sound strategy which could lead to rising profitability in the long term. I like the company’s focus on improving the quality of its asset base through a rationalisation process. This could help the business to focus on its most profitable assets, while also retaining a degree of diversity which is not found in all of its industry peers that are listed in the FTSE 350. Since the Shell share price has experienced a downturn of late, it now offers a dividend yield of over 6%. I think this suggests the company offers good value for money – particularly because it has strong free cash flow according to my research. This may mean that it is able to grow its dividend at a fast pace over the medium term. Therefore, while it may experience greater volatility than the FTSE 100, I think that Shell could outperform the index. I’m generally bullish about the oil and gas sector on a long-term basis, and feel that Shell offers relatively low risks and improving return prospects relative to its sector peers. As a result, I feel that it has the capacity to offer strong performance on a relative basis over future years.
28/6/2019
14:51
the grumpy old men: Shell or BP: which FTSE 100 share would I buy now? Manika Premsingh | Friday, 28th June, 2019 | More on: BP RDSB Business man on stock market financial trade indicator background. Image source: Getty Images FTSE 100 giant Royal Dutch Shell‘s (LSE: RDSB) share price has been on the rise. It has increased by over 5% at the time of writing this article from the levels seen at the beginning of June. Further, even though there have been a few gyrations over the months, the share price has come a long way from the lowest levels seen in 2019 at the end of January. Needless to say, these are heartening developments for investors. Going forward, I will be watching the oil sector closely following tensions between the US and Iran and one key question comes to my mind: what is the potential impact on the share price of an oil company like Shell or its peer BP (LSE: BP)? Oil price outlook There’s no denying that higher oil prices are good for oil companies, but the potential economic damage from standoffs between countries can erode demand over the longer term, which in turn can negate the gains from price increases. I think both these arguments are worth considering, since we at the Motley Fool are interested in long-term investment opportunities. There’s no way of knowing how the geo-politics will play out, but I am yet to see any dependable forecasts predicting sharp increases in crude oil prices. In fact, if the situation remains contained, it could be exactly the opposite. The International Energy Agency’s update in mid-June said that supply is enough to “limit significant upward pressure on oil prices” going into 2020. Shell looks ahead with confidence With this as the background, I’d consider Shell’s merits as a company independent of the wider environment it operates in to make an investing decision. In other words, the latest oil price increases are a distraction from the actual investing story rather than a determining factor. From the last time I wrote about it, fully convinced that this is indeed a share worth holding in the long-term, little has changed. In fact, the price has risen by around 20% since. The company also sounds confident about the future, as revealed in its latest strategy update and financial outlook for 2025. Despite this, its price-to-earnings ratio (12 months trailing) is at an affordable 11.6x compared to peer BP, which is trading at 14.3x. Interestingly enough, this is despite the fact that BP has seen a lower share price rise in recent months. While the price charts for both companies reveal that they tend to move together, Shell has been the one that has attracted most investor interest. BP has its merits This doesn’t of course mean that BP isn’t a buy as the company has a lot going for it too. I am inclined towards shares that offer a good return on capital but dividends are an important consideration for investors and BP ticks those boxes. As my Foolish colleague Rupert Hargreaves pointed out recently, its dividend per share has risen impressively over the years and its strong track record is expected to continue. The share has also given good returns on capital, and I believe there is little in the company’s performance to suggest that it will be derailed. On balance, though I’d rather buy Shell. The bargain-hunter in me is attracted to the fact that it is still the cheaper of the two but its strong current momentum also appeals. Capital Gains In the meantime, one of our top investing analysts has put together a free report called "A Top Growth Share From The Motley Fool", featuring a mid-cap firm enjoying strong growth that looks set to continue. To find out its name and why we like it for free, click here now! Manika Premsingh has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned.
13/5/2019
07:49
waldron: investomania Why I think the Royal Dutch Shell Plc share price could beat the FTSE 100 I’m optimistic about the prospects for the Royal Dutch Shell Plc Class B (LON:RDSB) (RDSB.L) share price versus the FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) May 13, 2019 Robert Stephens, CFA Shell (LON:RDSB) Shell Shell While the price of oil has surged higher in 2019, the Royal Dutch Shell Plc Class B (LON:RDSB) (RDSB.L) share price has risen by only 2%. That’s a disappointing performance in my view at a time when Brent has risen by around 25%. The performance of the oil major has lagged the FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX), which is up by around 8% since the start of the year. In spite of its slow start to 2019, I think the Shell share price could offer improving performance in the long run. I wouldn’t be surprised if it is able to outperform the FTSE 100 over future years. Favourable prospects Although news of a US-China trade war has dominated headlines over the last week, I remain optimistic about the outlook for the world economy. This could produce improving performance from the oil and gas sector, which is highly dependent upon the world economy’s prospects. In my view, there is also the potential for an imbalance between demand and supply of oil. Although on the demand front there could be weakness depending on how trade talks between the US and China progress, there may also be slowdown in supply growth. There are various major oil-producing nations, notably Saudi Arabia, which face geopolitical risks at the moment. Alongside the end of sanctions exemptions from Iran, this could lead to lower supply of oil over the medium term. This may help to support the oil price. Progress Shell’s recent updates have shown that it is making good progress in terms of improving its financial performance in my opinion. Its plans to reduce the size of its asset base could improve its efficiency, as well as boost its free cash flow. In turn, this could be used to strengthen the business through debt reduction, as well as support a higher dividend in future. With regard to its dividend, the Shell share price currently has a yield of around 6%. Given that its payout ratio is around 60% at the moment, I feel that it could afford to pay a rising dividend over the medium term. A forecast EPS growth rate of 18.6% for the current year suggests to me that it may be able to pay a higher dividend without hurting its financial strength. Valuation Since the Shell share price has a P/E ratio of around 10 at the moment, I feel that the company could offer good value for money. Sure, there could be further uncertainty in the near term from the potential for a full-scale global trade war between the US and China. But with the prospect of lower supply, as well as the stock’s margin of safety and income potential, I think that it could outperform the FTSE 100 over the long run.
24/4/2019
10:08
stewart64: Bit of a boiling frog on the disconnect between RDSB share price and the hotting up price of oil. Market accepts the new higher normal and the Oil Majors go nowhere. Remember rdsb was pushing £25 when Brent was back at $62 in February. I'm guessing climate activism might be a contributing factor. But the new profitable leaner Shell, proven by annuals, also now fading in memories.
06/2/2019
13:48
fjgooner: I have been tracing RDSB share price behaviour for some time now. The last dividend that went ex-div on November 15, 2018 acted quite strangely. The closing price the day before ex-div was 2,406. The closing price on ex-div day was 2,447 The closing price the day after ex-div day was 2,453. However, I usually pencil in a 1.5% drop for ex-div day for RDSB, so I would expect a 2500p price drop to around 2462p.
29/11/2018
00:15
fjgooner: Hoggy, You're quite right of course. That Motley Fool poster Royston Wild has been posting negatively on Shell for years, hoping that one day - just ONE day - that he may not look like the complete tool that he is on this topic. I keep tabs on this pest - here's a reminder. ----------- Re: Royston Wild has no position in any shares mentioned. That may possibly be true - except for a clearly apparent, jealous, negative obsession - and he certainly seems to have a determination to post relentless negative articles on Shell for ages. Why would someone with no interest post so many negative articles on the Motely Fool over several years? Have a look at: Http://www.fool.co.uk/company/page/1/?ticker=LSE-RDSB Below are a few typical Royston Wild headlines from 2016, but there are many more to choose from the link posted above throughout 2017 and I can't be bothered with 2018 - commitment of the highest possible order. Is there a clue in the title Motely Fool?. I've included below the Closing Price of Shell to give you an idea of how helpful his advice has been if the casual investor had taken it. RDSB Shareprice today: £23.83 76% higher than when he posted his classic "I believe investors should resist attempting to pick up a bargain" when the RDSB share price was at £13.51. That is why I personally choose to never take his opinion on Shell as anything other than comical. And irritating for the absolute lack of acknowledging how he's got it wrong on every prior "article". But this one from March this year sums this poster up the best: Https://www.fool.co.uk/investing/2017/03/21/why-id-never-buy-royal-dutch-shell-plc/ Why I’d never buy Royal Dutch Shell plc Never? Lol. Don't get your clown shoes trapped in the rotating doors on your way out. Best regards, FJ ------------------------- Why Now May Be The Time To Sell Anglo American plc, Tesco PLC & Royal Dutch Shell Plc By Royston Wild - Thursday, 14 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £18.13 Why I Wouldn't Touch Royal Dutch Shell Plc & Tullow Oil plc With A Bargepole! By Royston Wild - Friday, 8 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £17.40 Can 1st Quarter Winners Royal Dutch Shell Plc (+10%), Unilever plc (+8%) & KAZ Minerals PLC (+67%) Keep Climbing? By Royston Wild - Friday, 1 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.83 Is It Finally Time To Give Up On Royal Dutch Shell Plc? By Royston Wild - Thursday, 24 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.88 Is Royal Dutch Shell Plc In Danger Of A Colossal Correction? By Royston Wild - Thursday, 17 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £17.38 Why Royal Dutch Shell Plc¢â‚¬â„¢s Dividend Outlook Should Scare You By Royston Wild - Thursday, 10 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.41 Are Lloyds Banking Group PLC & Royal Dutch Shell Plc REALLY Great Value? By Royston Wild - Monday, 29 February, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.45 When Will Shares In Royal Dutch Shell Plc Finally Reach Bottom? By Royston Wild - Wednesday, 17 February, 2016 His comment: I believe much further trouble is in store for Shell looking ahead and expect shares to keep on falling. RDSB Shareprice was at £16.36 Royal Dutch Shell Plc & Vodafone Group plc: Value Titans Or Value Traps? By Royston Wild - Tuesday, 9 February, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £14.61 Why Royal Dutch Shell Plc Shares Could Easily Topple Another 15%! By Royston Wild - Friday, 29 January, 2016 His comment: A subsequent re-rating of Shell¢â‚¬â„¢s share price would leave the oil leviathan dealing at £12.80 per share, representing a vast 15% reduction from current levels. But even this projection be considered optimistic, in my opinion. RDSB Shareprice was at £15.21 Why Buying BP plc & Royal Dutch Shell Plc Is Utter Madness! By Royston Wild - Friday, 15 January, 2016 His comment: I believe investors should resist attempting to pick up a bargain. RDSB Shareprice was at £13.51 Royal Dutch Shell Plc & GlaxoSmithKline plc: Brilliant Bargains Or Value Traps? By Royston Wild - Friday, 8 January, 2016 His comment: I believe Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) can be considered a bona-fide value trap at the present time. RDSB Shareprice was at £13.75
27/4/2018
09:45
ariane: 4 Reasons Why Investors Like Buybacks By Trevir Nath | Updated October 3, 2017 — 10:00 AM EDT Share Ultimately, highly successful companies reach a position where they are generating more cash than they can reasonably reinvest in the business. The financial crisis has caused investors to pressure companies to distribute the accumulated wealth back to shareholders. Typically, companies can return wealth to shareholders through stock price appreciations, dividends, or stock buybacks. In the past, dividends were the most common form of wealth distribution. However, as Corporate America becomes more progressive and flexible, a fundamental shift has occurred in the way companies deploy capital. Instead of traditional dividend payments, buybacks have been viewed as a flexible practice of returning excess cash flow. Buybacks can be seen as an efficient way to put money back into its shareholders pockets, as recently demonstrated by Apple’s (APPL ) capital return programs. The Basics of Buybacks In recent history, leading companies have adopted a regular buyback strategy to return all excess cash to shareholders. By definition, stock repurchasing allows companies to reinvest in themselves by reducing the number of outstanding shares on the market. Typically, buybacks are carried out on the open market, similarly to how investors purchase stocks. While there has been a clear shift in wealth distribution of dividends to stock repurchasing, this doesn’t mean a company cannot pursue both. Apple investors have grown to prefer buybacks since they have the choice of whether or not to partake in the repurchase program. By not participating in a share buyback, investors can defer taxes and turn their shares into future gains. From a financial perspective, buybacks benefit investors by improving shareholder value, increasing share prices, and creating tax beneficial opportunities. Improved Shareholder Value There are many ways profitable companies can measure the success of its stocks. However the most common measurement is earnings per share (EPS). Earnings per share are typically viewed as the single most important variable in determining share prices. It is the portion of a company’s profit allocated to each outstanding share of common stock. When companies pursue share buyback, they will essentially reduce the assets on their balance sheets and increase their return on assets. Likewise, by reducing the number of outstanding shares and maintaining the same level of profitability, EPS will increase. For shareholders who do not sell their shares, they now have a higher percent of ownership of the company’s shares and a higher price per share. Those who do choose to sell have done so at a price they were willing to sell at. Boost in Share Prices When the economy is faltering, share prices can plummet as a result of weaker than expected earnings amongst other factors. In this event, a company will pursue a buyback program since it believes that company shares are undervalued. Companies will choose to repurchase shares and then resell them in the open market once the price increase to accurately reflect the value of the company. When earnings per share increases, the market will perceive this positively and share prices will increase after buybacks are announced. This often comes down to simple supply and demand. When there is a less available supply of shares, then an upward demand will boost share prices. Tax Benefits When excess cash is used to repurchase company stock, instead of increasing dividend payments, shareholders have the opportunity to defer capital gains if share prices increase. Traditionally, buybacks are taxed at a capital gains tax rate, whereas dividends are subject to ordinary income tax. If the stock has been held for more than one year, the gains would be subject to a lower capital gains rate. Excess Cash When companies pursue buyback programs, this demonstrates to investors that the company has additional cash on hand. If a company has excess cash, then at worst the investors do not need to worry about cash flow problems. More importantly, it signals to investors that the company feels cash is better used to reimburse shareholders than reinvest alternative assets. In essence, this supports the price of the stock and provides long-term security for investors. The Downside While investors tend to adore buybacks, there are several disadvantages investors should be aware of. Buybacks can be a signal of the marketing topping out; many companies will repurchase stocks to artificially boost share prices. Typically, executive compensations are tied to earnings metrics, and if earnings cannot be increased, buybacks can superficially boost earnings. Also, when buybacks are announced, any share price increase will typically benefit short-term investors rather than investors seeking long-term value. This creates a false signal to the market that earnings are improving due to organic growth and ultimately ends up hurting value. The Bottom Line Generally speaking, redistributing wealth has been viewed positively by investors. This can come in the form of dividends, retained earnings, and the popular buyback strategy. In terms of finance, buybacks can boost shareholder value and share prices while also creating a tax advantageous opportunity for investors. While buybacks are important to financial stability, a company’s fundamentals and historical track record are more important to long-term value creation. Read more: 4 Reasons Why Investors Like Buybacks | Investopedia Https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/123115/4-reasons-why-investors-buybacks.asp#ixzz5DrQCbE2G Follow us: Investopedia on Facebook
23/4/2018
23:23
fjgooner: 2hoggy, Same as you my friend. As I implied, I come from a working class family in a deprived coastal town in England and have worked very hard & invested carefully over the years to become comfortable now in my older years (now over 50). But, like anyone else, I am not in the business to lose money from here. Happily, Shell and this sector look safest in that respect in late cycle dynamics. Shell currently looks set to be a stellar stock pick for 2018Q2 and beyond. Even this week's 2018Q1 should be received well and point towards an improving free cash flow profile for the year ahead. With FCFP improvements enabling further key reductions in gearing, share buybacks look set to be initiated sometime soon, and hopefully before the share price rises too quickly. This in my one main annoyance with buybacks - they always seem to occur when a company's share price is doing well and are therefore comparatively expensive. A frustrating paradox, but I do understand why ... With $75 Brent as of tonight, I doubt we'll see a low RDSB share price again anytime soon, so Shell may as well get on with their buyback soon. :)
09/12/2017
16:38
fjgooner: Yawn. Royston yet again. You're getting seriously boring Royston. Re: Royston Wild has no position in any shares mentioned. That may well be true, but he certainly seems to have a determination to post relentless negative articles on Shell for ages. Why would someone with no interest post so many negative articles on the Motely Fool? Have a look at: Http://www.fool.co.uk/company/page/1/?ticker=LSE-RDSB Below are a few typical Royston Wild headlines from 2016, but there are many more to choose from the link posted above throughout 2017 - commitment of the highest possible order. Is there a clue in the title Motely Fool?. I've included below the Closing Price of Shell to give you an idea of how helpful his advice has been if the casual investor had taken it. RDSB Shareprice today: £23.85 76% higher than when he posted his classic "I believe investors should resist attempting to pick up a bargain" when the RDSB share price was at £13.51. That is why I personally choose to never take his opinion on Shell as anything other than comical. And irritating for the absolute lack of acknowledging how he's got it wrong on every prior "article". But this one from March this year sums this poster up the best: Https://www.fool.co.uk/investing/2017/03/21/why-id-never-buy-royal-dutch-shell-plc/ Why I’d never buy Royal Dutch Shell plc Never? Lol. Don't get your clown shoes trapped in the rotating doors on your way out. Best regards, FJ ------------------------- Why Now May Be The Time To Sell Anglo American plc, Tesco PLC & Royal Dutch Shell Plc By Royston Wild - Thursday, 14 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £18.13 Why I Wouldn't Touch Royal Dutch Shell Plc & Tullow Oil plc With A Bargepole! By Royston Wild - Friday, 8 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £17.40 Can 1st Quarter Winners Royal Dutch Shell Plc (+10%), Unilever plc (+8%) & KAZ Minerals PLC (+67%) Keep Climbing? By Royston Wild - Friday, 1 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.83 Is It Finally Time To Give Up On Royal Dutch Shell Plc? By Royston Wild - Thursday, 24 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.88 Is Royal Dutch Shell Plc In Danger Of A Colossal Correction? By Royston Wild - Thursday, 17 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £17.38 Why Royal Dutch Shell Plc¢â‚¬â„¢s Dividend Outlook Should Scare You By Royston Wild - Thursday, 10 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.41 Are Lloyds Banking Group PLC & Royal Dutch Shell Plc REALLY Great Value? By Royston Wild - Monday, 29 February, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.45 When Will Shares In Royal Dutch Shell Plc Finally Reach Bottom? By Royston Wild - Wednesday, 17 February, 2016 His comment: I believe much further trouble is in store for Shell looking ahead and expect shares to keep on falling. RDSB Shareprice was at £16.36 Royal Dutch Shell Plc & Vodafone Group plc: Value Titans Or Value Traps? By Royston Wild - Tuesday, 9 February, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £14.61 Why Royal Dutch Shell Plc Shares Could Easily Topple Another 15%! By Royston Wild - Friday, 29 January, 2016 His comment: A subsequent re-rating of Shell¢â‚¬â„¢s share price would leave the oil leviathan dealing at £12.80 per share, representing a vast 15% reduction from current levels. But even this projection be considered optimistic, in my opinion. RDSB Shareprice was at £15.21 Why Buying BP plc & Royal Dutch Shell Plc Is Utter Madness! By Royston Wild - Friday, 15 January, 2016 His comment: I believe investors should resist attempting to pick up a bargain. RDSB Shareprice was at £13.51 Royal Dutch Shell Plc & GlaxoSmithKline plc: Brilliant Bargains Or Value Traps? By Royston Wild - Friday, 8 January, 2016 His comment: I believe Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) can be considered a bona-fide value trap at the present time. RDSB Shareprice was at £13.75
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