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GSK Gsk Plc

1,604.50
-5.50 (-0.34%)
14 Jun 2024 - Closed
Delayed by 15 minutes
Gsk Investors - GSK

Gsk Investors - GSK

Share Name Share Symbol Market Stock Type
Gsk Plc GSK London Ordinary Share
  Price Change Price Change % Share Price Last Trade
-5.50 -0.34% 1,604.50 16:35:09
Open Price Low Price High Price Close Price Previous Close
1,611.50 1,599.50 1,615.50 1,604.50 1,610.00
more quote information »
Industry Sector
PHARMACEUTICALS & BIOTECHNOLOGY

Top Investor Posts

Top Posts
Posted at 08/6/2024 15:33 by pj84
"American regulator set to approve wider use of GSK’s Arexvy
US Food and Drug Administration is due to authorise a respiratory virus vaccine for adults aged 50 to 59 in a boost to the British pharmaceuticals company"

...

"Arexvy was first approved for use in adults aged 60 and older and is an important part of the revival of GSK’s drugs pipeline."

...

"Arexvy generated sales of £1.2 billion last year and led GSK to upgrade its longer-term financial forecasts, increasing investors’ confidence in the company’s strategy."

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"GSK has filed regulatory submissions to extend the use of the vaccine elsewhere, including in Europe and Japan. Scientists are also evaluating the vaccine in adults aged 18 to 49. The results are expected in the second half of this year."
Posted at 03/6/2024 17:39 by cynicalsteve
One of the reasons why America is so wealthy is that they steal money from foreign investors (especially us) at every opportunity.
Posted at 02/5/2024 09:24 by geckotheglorious
II view

”GSK extends share price rally after very healthy results
The turnaround at this UK pharmaceutical giant continues following these well-received quarterly results. City writer Graeme Evans explains why investors keep chasing the shares higher.

Upgraded guidance and a bigger-than-expected quarterly dividend today moved GSK  shares closer to where they were prior to their summer 2022 Zantac-led crash.

The drugs giant plans to pay shareholders 15p a share on 11 July, which US bank Jefferies said compared with the City consensus of 14.7p and its own 14.5p estimate. Last year’s quarterly dividend was 14p.
The company continues to forecast a full-year payout of 60p a share, which is based on its policy of a 40-60% payout ratio through the investment cycle.

Shares rose 40p to 1,713p, taking gains for this year to 16%, after first-quarter revenues of £7.36 billion topped City hopes by 4% and led to a 16% beat on the earnings per share result of 43.1p.

The improvement was fuelled by strong sales of shingles vaccine Shingrix, which rose 18% to £945 million on the back of immunisation programmes in Australia and Europe, including the UK. It also benefited from earlier than anticipated supply to GSK’s partner in China.

Markets outside the US now represent more than 50% of global Shingrix sales, up from 40% the same quarter a year ago. The vaccine has been launched in 39 countries, the majority of which have average cumulative immunisation rates below 5%.

US sales decreased 7% against tougher comparatives, after the country’s immunisation rate at the end of 2023 reached 37% of the more than 120 million US adults currently recommended to receive Shingrix, up seven percentage points since the end of 2022.

Arexvy, a respiratory syncytial virus vaccine for older adults, recorded sales of £182 million following its launch in the US in the third quarter of last year. More than seven million of the country’s 83 million adults at risk have so far been protected by Arexvy.

In speciality medicines, strong performances in HIV, respiratory and immunology and oncology helped the division’s sales up by 17% to £2.5 billion. Total group sales rose 10% on a constant currency basis, with growth across the first half set to be stronger than the second due to tougher comparisons and the timing of Shingrix sales in China.

GSK’s forecasts for 2024 now point to turnover growth towards the upper part of the 5-7% range and core operating profit growth of 9% to 11% compared with 7-10% previously. Core earnings per share growth of 8% to 10% is up from 6-9% given at 2023 results.

The drugs pipeline now features 72 vaccines and specialty medicines, with 18 assets in the Phase III later stages of development.

Chief executive Emma Walmsley said: “We have made a strong start to 2024, with another quarter of excellent performance and continued pipeline progress, including positive data readouts for four phase III medicines.”

Taken together with other R&D achievements, she said GSK had strengthened its position in its key therapeutic areas of infectious diseases, HIV, respiratory/immunology and oncology.

She added: “We expect this strong momentum to continue, and look forward to delivering another year of meaningful growth in sales and earnings in 2024.”Shares are now within 100p of where they were two years ago prior to the disclosure of US litigation on heartburn drug Zantac. They were just 1,316p in July last year.
Jefferies is backing shares to reach 1,950p. It said today: “We are well above consensus 2026 estimates and believe long-acting HIV injectables, vaccines, and new pipeline launches mean profits likely face a blip not cliff on 2028 HIV patent expiries.

“We argue given this under-appreciated growth profile, the shares offer attractive risk-reward ahead of potential Zantac class action settlement.”

The Zantac issue has overshadowed the company’s attempts to convince the City of its standalone potential since splitting off consumer healthcare operation Haleon  in 2022.

It continues to defend itself against the claims but doing so has taken time, with cases scheduled in Illinois, Texas and Nevada between now and March 2025.

GSK reached a confidential settlement on a trial due to begin last month in California, a move it said reflected the company’s desire to avoid the distraction related to protracted litigation. It did not admit any liability in the settlement and said it would “continue to vigorously defend itself based on the facts and the science in all other Zantac cases”.
Posted at 01/5/2024 10:23 by anhar
Not bad figures generally and the modest net borrowing reduction is welcome as they have long been drowning in debt, but as an income investor I'm still feeling the effect of the large cut since the old GSK 80p payout in 21, the last full pre-demerger year. The intended 60p divi for 24, plus whatever the payout is from my HLN allocation for this year, is very likely to remain well below that 80p.

But at least things are very slowly moving in the right direction.

I've held GSK, and latterly GSK+HLN, since forever. I'm showing a gain but not much on an annualised basis, despite recent price rises. However price fluctuations are of very little interest really, it's all about the divis for me. The prospective 60p divi makes a forward yield of 3.5% at 1,700p, marginally below the FTSE100 and not very high for a share with their questionable record, but my strategy is to hold indefinitely in most cases.
Posted at 01/5/2024 07:24 by cumnor
Totally agree, why bother with 5% guaranteed in bank...

Holding share price back-and they can afford it but investors a low priority.
Posted at 03/4/2024 08:21 by geckotheglorious
GSK picking up momentum, says HL’s Clayton
GSK (GSK) is ‘fighting back into contention’ with a bumper crop of new product launches in the pipeline, says Hargreaves Lansdown manager Steve Clayton.

Clayton holds the Citywire Elite Companies AAA-rated pharmaceutical giant in his HL Select UK Income Shares fund, where it makes up 3% of the £138m portfolio.

The group has been focused on restructuring, with a spin out of its consumer division Haleon (HLN), and developing new medicines such as shingles vaccine Shingrix, which Clayton said is ‘already a multi-billion dollars a year product’.

The arrival of US activist investors Elliott Management a few years ago highlighted ‘the weak returns GSK had achieved, despite some real clinical strengths within the business’.

‘The company is now more optimistic about its research pipeline delivering more meaningful new drugs than for many years,’ Clayton said.

‘GSK’s business has more clarity about it these days and its current pipeline of 71 assets is predicted by GSK to contain at least 12 major new products to be launched from 2025 onwards.’

The shares dropped 2.5% to £16.65 on Tuesday, but have added almost 16% over the last 12 months.
Posted at 14/2/2024 11:21 by tradermichael
However,

Technical analysts use support and resistance levels to identify price points on a chart where the probabilities favour a pause or reversal of a prevailing trend.

Support occurs where a downtrend is expected to pause due to a concentration of demand.

Resistance occurs where an uptrend is expected to pause temporarily, due to a concentration of supply.

Market psychology plays a major role as traders and investors remember the past and react to changing conditions to anticipate future market movement.

Support and resistance areas can be identified on charts using trendlines and moving averages.
Posted at 31/1/2024 12:18 by anhar
Yes of course, whatever it's called. From memory wasn't this the acq for which they paid something like a 100% premium over the pre bid price when nearly all bids go for way less than that?

I don't want to get in too close to any share in my income port. I think that doing so can blind investors to the bigger picture of eps, cash flow, debt, yield etc. thinking that some wonder drug, in this case, will be a nice earner. How many times have such hopes been dashed?

So over the years as an income investor I've become just a numbers player on the fundamentals of a share. I wouldn't know camlipixant from my behind and if I chose to invest that way it would lead me astray, causing a love affair with the share and losing investment perspective. I know FA about the drug industry and don't want to know either.

So I take very little interest in the fine detail of any of my many holdings, just enough to know what industry they're in to ensure diversification. After that, it's the three main indicators: numbers, numbers, numbers.
Posted at 03/1/2024 10:19 by pj84
The following is an extract from the article: -

GSK’s revival ‘will become clear to investors in 2024’

...


“When we meet investors, the things that they say to us are, ‘We want to see visible progress in the pipeline.’ So that’s readouts and we’ve got a number of those coming up next year in oncology and respiratory, as well as infectious diseases.”

They include hopes for Blenrep, a blood cancer treatment, which produced encouraging trial results in November, a year after it had suffered a clinical setback. “If we can show that there’s a pathway back to the market, this is an important element for our credibility,” Miels said

Another is depemokimab, a twice-yearly injection to treat asthma and other respiratory diseases, and camlipixant, a potential treatment for refractory chronic cough, taken as a twice-daily pill. Both are potential blockbusters, or drugs that generate annual sales of at least $1 billion for their company, in late-stage development.

GSK has been bolstering its late-stage pipeline through bolt-on and licensing deals, including agreements in October and December for cancer drugs developed by Hansoh Pharma, of China.

...
Posted at 02/11/2023 23:28 by cumnor
Patient Capital, the real growth story here is baloney and Monty points to share price performance over 20+ years as proof pudding (it's not the markets fault). Vaccines don't, unfairly imo, cut the same ice as blockbuster statins, weight suppressants or oncology drugs.
Until she delivers GROWTH investors want dividends and too many are giving 8% (lgen, bdev, hbr etc and have been decimated but are still excellent companies) to make GSK's (pipedream) 3.95% less than tempting.
The day's of pharma being a ;special' case are gone-investors want return for risk and Emma is not quite getting it. She needs to give 6% (74P) to maintain current share price or see a drift to low £12s as investors opt for safe treasuries yielding 5%+ which will be available for the next year. Otherwise she needs to pack her bags asap. imo

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