Glaxosmithkline Dividends - GSK

Glaxosmithkline Dividends - GSK

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Stock Name Stock Symbol Market Stock Type Stock ISIN Stock Description
Glaxosmithkline Plc GSK London Ordinary Share GB0009252882 ORD 25P
  Price Change Price Change % Stock Price High Price Low Price Open Price Close Price Last Trade
  -10.80 -0.66% 1,635.40 1,648.60 1,620.00 1,644.40 1,646.20 13:26:29
more quote information »
Industry Sector
PHARMACEUTICALS & BIOTECHNOLOGY

Glaxosmithkline GSK Dividends History

Announcement Date Type Currency Dividend Amount Period Start Period End Ex Date Record Date Payment Date Total Dividend Amount
06/02/2019FinalGBX2331/12/201731/12/201821/02/201922/02/201911/04/201980
31/10/20181GBX1931/12/201731/12/201815/11/201816/11/201810/01/20190
25/07/20181GBX1931/12/201731/12/201809/08/201810/08/201811/10/20180
25/04/20181GBX1931/12/201731/12/201810/05/201811/05/201812/07/20180
07/02/2018FinalGBX2331/12/201631/12/201722/02/201823/02/201812/04/201880
25/10/20171GBX1931/12/201631/12/201709/11/201710/11/201711/01/20180
26/07/20171GBX1931/12/201631/12/201710/08/201711/08/201712/10/20170
26/04/20171GBX1931/12/201631/12/201711/05/201712/05/201713/07/20170
08/02/2017FinalGBX2331/12/201531/12/201623/02/201724/02/201713/04/201780
26/10/20161GBX1931/12/201531/12/201603/11/201604/11/201612/01/20170
27/07/20161GBX1931/12/201531/12/201611/08/201612/08/201613/10/20160
27/04/20161GBX1931/12/201531/12/201612/05/201613/05/201614/07/20160
03/02/2016FinalGBX2331/12/201431/12/201518/02/201619/02/201614/04/2016100
03/02/2016SpecialGBX2031/12/201431/12/201518/02/201619/02/201614/04/20160
19/10/20151GBX1931/12/201431/12/201512/11/201513/11/201514/01/20160
29/07/20151GBX1931/12/201431/12/201513/08/201514/08/201501/10/20150
06/05/20151GBX1931/12/201431/12/201514/05/201515/05/201509/07/20150
04/02/2015FinalGBX2331/12/201331/12/201419/02/201520/02/201509/04/201580
22/10/20141GBX1931/12/201331/12/201406/11/201407/11/201408/01/20150
24/07/20141GBX1931/12/201331/12/201406/08/201408/08/201402/10/20140
30/04/20141GBX1931/12/201331/12/201414/05/201416/05/201410/07/20140
05/02/2014FinalGBX2331/12/201231/12/201319/02/201421/02/201410/04/201478
23/10/20131GBX1931/12/201231/12/201313/11/201315/11/201309/01/20140
24/07/20131GBX1831/12/201231/12/201307/08/201309/08/201303/10/20130
24/04/20131GBX1831/12/201231/12/201308/05/201310/05/201311/07/20130
06/02/2013FinalGBX2231/12/201131/12/201220/02/201322/02/201311/04/201374
31/10/20121GBX1831/12/201131/12/201214/11/201216/11/201203/01/20130
25/07/20121GBX1731/12/201131/12/201208/08/201210/08/201204/10/20120
25/04/20121GBX1731/12/201131/12/201209/05/201211/05/201205/07/20120
07/02/2012SpecialGBX531/12/201031/12/201115/02/201217/02/201212/04/20120
07/02/2012FinalGBX2131/12/201031/12/201115/02/201217/02/201212/04/201275
26/10/2011InterimGBX1731/12/201031/12/201102/11/201104/11/201105/01/20120
26/07/2011InterimGBX1631/12/201031/12/201103/08/201105/08/201106/10/20110
27/04/2011InterimGBX1631/12/201031/12/201104/05/201106/05/201107/07/20110
03/02/2011FinalGBX1931/12/200931/12/201009/02/201111/02/201107/04/201165
21/10/2010InterimGBX1631/12/200931/12/201027/10/201029/10/201006/01/20110
21/07/2010InterimGBX1531/12/200931/12/201028/07/201030/07/201007/10/20100
28/04/2010InterimGBX1531/12/200931/12/201005/05/201007/05/201008/07/20100
04/02/2010FinalGBX1831/12/200831/12/200910/02/201012/02/201008/04/201061
29/10/20091GBX1531/12/200831/12/200904/11/200906/09/200907/01/20100
30/07/20091GBX1431/12/200831/12/200931/07/200931/07/200908/10/200928
22/04/20091GBX1431/12/200831/12/200929/04/200901/05/200909/07/20090
05/02/2009FinalGBX1731/12/200731/12/200811/02/200913/02/200909/04/200957
22/10/20081GBX1431/12/200731/12/200829/10/200831/10/200809/01/20080
07/02/2008FinalGBX1331/12/200631/12/200713/02/200815/02/200810/04/200853
25/07/20071GBX1231/12/200631/12/200701/08/200703/08/200711/10/20070
24/04/20071GBX1231/12/200631/12/200702/05/200704/05/200712/07/20070
08/02/20071GBX1431/12/200531/12/200614/02/200616/02/200612/04/20070
08/02/2007FinalGBX031/12/200531/12/200601/01/197001/01/197001/01/197048
26/10/20061GBX1231/12/200531/12/200601/11/200603/11/200604/01/20070
26/07/20061GBX1131/12/200531/12/200602/08/200604/08/200605/10/20060
27/04/20061GBX1131/12/200531/12/200610/05/200612/05/200606/07/20060
08/02/2006FinalGBX1431/12/200431/12/200515/02/200617/02/200606/04/200644
27/10/20051GBX1031/12/200431/12/200502/11/200504/11/200505/01/20060
29/07/20051GBX1031/12/200431/12/200503/08/200505/08/200506/10/20050
28/04/20051GBX1031/12/200431/12/200511/05/200513/05/200507/07/20050
10/02/2005FinalGBX1231/12/200331/12/200416/02/200518/02/200507/04/200542
28/10/20041GBX1031/12/200331/12/200403/11/200405/11/200406/01/20050
27/07/20041GBX1031/12/200331/12/200404/08/200406/08/200430/09/20040
27/07/20041GBX1031/12/200331/12/200412/05/200414/05/200401/07/20040
12/02/2004FinalGBX1431/12/200231/12/200318/02/200420/02/200415/04/200441
11/02/20041GBX931/12/200231/12/200329/10/200331/10/200306/01/20040
23/07/20031GBX931/12/200231/12/200330/07/200301/08/200302/10/20030
30/04/20031GBX931/12/200231/12/200307/05/200309/05/200303/07/20030
12/02/2003FinalGBX1331/12/200131/12/200219/02/200321/02/200317/04/200340
23/10/20021GBX930/03/200230/09/200230/10/200201/11/200203/01/20030
24/07/20021GBX930/12/200130/06/200231/07/200202/08/200203/10/20020
25/04/20021GBX901/10/200131/03/200201/05/200203/05/200204/07/20020
14/02/2002FinalGBX1231/12/200031/12/200120/02/200222/02/200218/04/200239
23/10/20011GBX930/09/200030/09/200131/10/200102/11/200103/01/20020
24/07/20011GBX930/06/200030/06/200101/08/200103/08/200104/10/20010
24/04/20011GBX931/03/200031/03/200102/05/200104/05/200105/07/20010
13/12/2000FinalGBX2331/12/199931/12/200018/12/200022/12/200017/04/200138
27/07/2000InterimGBX1530/12/199930/06/200007/08/200011/08/200016/10/20000
16/02/2000FinalGBX2231/12/199831/12/199928/02/200003/03/200025/05/200037
29/07/1999InterimGBX1530/12/199830/06/199909/08/199913/08/199901/10/19990
18/02/1999FinalGBX2131/12/199731/12/199801/03/199905/03/199920/05/199936

Top Dividend Posts

DateSubject
18/10/2019
15:11
tradermichael: Seems increasingly that the GSK share price is driven not by the markets, not by sales, not by pipeline products or business development or corporate actions, but by the short-term £/USD exchange rate!
08/10/2019
17:53
jubberjim: Withdrawal of zantac due to carcinigenic ingredient Would think will adversely affect share price But from past experience the bots are in control with neither logic or reason entering into their programme so will watch from sidelines for time being Be very careful
08/8/2019
08:14
tradermichael: For the record (once and for all), this share went ex dividend today, offering 19p. At opening, there was a slight rise in price, NOT an 'automatic' drop of 19p! This is not the first time this effect has been seen, and it goes against the popular myth that a share price is reduced by default by the amount of the dividend from the start of trading on xd morning.
05/8/2019
07:02
sogoesit: TM’ comment: “Its not necessarily a given that merging out/selling 0ff/floating off-patent products/generic products/non-prescription products ('consumer healthcare') will unlock value ('sum of the parts' theory) and boost the prorated share price of a big pharmaceutical company.” Agreed that this is not “a given”. What is? But there is a chance and we make our guesses as to that probability. Restructuring does, in general, throw up opportunities. What they are is difficult to foretell. In the same way that M&A generally fails the reverse may be true. At least we will get price discovery, positively or negatively, and a fairer view of the price of the parts. Good luck either way. AIMV
02/8/2019
13:32
tradermichael: Its not necessarily a given that merging out/selling 0ff/floating off-patent products/generic products/non-prescription products ('consumer healthcare') will unlock value ('sum of the parts' theory) and boost the prorated share price of a big pharmaceutical company. Take a look at Pfizer. After closing Friday at more than $43, Pfizer shares have since dropped to the $38 range after sealing a merger of its off-patent drugs business with Mylan. Without its consumer health business and its established products unit, Pfizer will be doubling down on branded prescription drugs. And in their remaining division, “both revenue and EPS growth will be higher" while the size of the top line itself — and earnings figures, too — will shrink. Time will tell, but watch that outcome with GSK in mind ………; ;0)
09/7/2019
15:45
lippy4: yes 8 million cows killed when there was no reason,good old eu in action,i dont think.. love the share price that millionaire was so wrong about it dropping like a stone,hopefully this is the future.. divi day will be the main factor for the future.
08/7/2019
14:34
bazzerhino: I read somewhere that the share price usually drops on the day that dividends are paid. Is that what happens here?
03/7/2019
08:28
quepassa: Strong graph. amazing recovery from 1250p 18 months ago. looking good . The weakness of sterling not yet fully factored into share price for GSK who derive so much income from overseas. ALL IMO. DYOR. QP
06/12/2018
09:30
anhar: In December 2000, two of the UK's largest pharmaceutical companies, Glaxo Wellcome and SmithKline Beecham came together to form global giant GlaxoSmithKline. At that time, GSK's share price was close to £21, valuing the firm at close to £110bn and putting it in the top three of the FTSE 100. Fast forward almost 18 years and GSK's share price is around £14.75, or about a third lower than at the time of the merger. That’s a bitter pill to swallow for investors as the deal has failed to prevent the destroyal of roughly £30bn of shareholder wealth. TM: Most will be aware of this appalling long term capital performance by GSK. The mystery is why you think it's the one share in which to invest so much, with that history. This is not a new thing, it's been clear for many years that GSK is an awful share for capital gain purposes. I invest only for income and have held for a long time now during which it has done what I wanted on dividends, up to a point though even that's been frozen for years now, but if I was a capital player and willing to risk it all or most on just one stock, I would never consider GSK. They are proven losers, at least over the last 18 years. Long term my dividend stocks have in total done very well on capital, though that's not why I invest this way, but GSK is one of the exceptions. In fact with the market fall pushing up the FTSE100 yield, and GSK's frozen 80p dividend making a yield of 5.6% at 1435p, it's getting closer to my exit point.
02/12/2017
17:58
mj19: Is a Dividend Cut Coming From GlaxoSmithKline plc?newsfeedback@fool.com (Jim Crumly) Dec 2, 2017 Updated 32 min ago Is a Dividend Cut Coming From GlaxoSmithKline plc?FacebookTwitterEmailPrintSaveOne of the attractions of investing in British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline plc (NYSE: GSK) is its generous dividend yield, which lately has hovered at just a bit less than 6%. A yield that's so far out of whack with peers in the industry is an indication that the market is discounting trouble ahead. How likely is a dividend cut, and is the recent drop in the stock price a warning or a buying opportunity?GlaxoSmithKline's shares have slumped since early summer, and the biggest concern has been the safety of the dividend. At a July 26 investor event, Glaxo CEO Emma Walmsley and her team stirred up new worries about the dividend when they announced a change in policy coming after 2018. The company is committed to maintaining the current dividend through 2018, but after that, Glaxo will return to its pre-2015 practice of declaring the payout on a quarter-by-quarter basis rather than committing to it in advance.Image source: GlaxoSmithKline plc.After 2018, Glaxo will have a goal to have 1.25 to 1.5 times coverage of dividend payments with free cash flow. That's totally reasonable, and is a financial conservatism that dividend investors love to see. The problem is, despite improving cash flow in recent quarters, the company isn't anywhere near that now.When questioned by analysts, the company admitted that it will probably take several years before free cash flow amounts to 125% to 150% of the current dividend, leaving open the question of whether there will be a dividend cut after 2018. When Glaxo executives refused to rule that out and stated that growth investments will be prioritized over the dividend, the market immediately started assuming a cut was in the offing, bidding down the stock price and therefore driving up the yield.Data from YCHARTS.In 2016, free cash flow amounted to 80% of the dividend payout. Free cash flow is particularly lumpy because of the timing of various payments and inventory builds, but so far in 2017, it's up 29% from last year, and the guidance is that Q4 cash flow will be strong. If the 29% growth holds up for the whole year, 2017 free cash flow would edge up just over 100% of the cash need for the dividend. Assuming 2018 also is a growth year for cash, Glaxo could afford to maintain the dividend without increasing debt and may actually get close to the coverage goal. Maintenance of the current dividend during a transition to the long-term goal is a strong possibility.If free cash flow is above 100% dividend but below the long-term goal of 125% to 150%, will Glaxo cut the dividend? I don't think so. The company hopes to grow into its goal over a period of years, but it recognizes how important the dividend is to its shareholders. If management had any doubt about that, it should have been erased with the 14% decline in the share price since the July event, when the issue moved to front and center.Fast-forward to about a year from now. All things being equal, if Glaxo indicates that it will maintain the current dividend into 2019 and beyond, the shares are likely to rebound the 15% they have fallen since the day before the July investor event. That would be a nice gain for patient investors.But there's one problem with this assumption.Glaxo may go shoppingIn October, Pfizer announced that it was looking into options to spin off or sell its $3.4 billion consumer products business, which includes two of the top 10 global brands, Advil and Centrum. GlaxoSmithKline would be the obvious buyer in such a big deal, having traded assets for the consumer business of Novartis in 2015 to create a joint venture. In the third-quarter conference call, Walmsley, who had led the consumer business before taking the top job earlier this year, confirmed that the company is interested.Analysts immediately expressed concern that any deal to pick up Pfizer's consumer business would jeopardize the dividend. A deal seems very possible, with Walmsley saying the company wanted to build up its consumer business and having declared that investments for long-term business growth will be the highest priority for capital allocation. Even if a deal with Pfizer could be structured in such a way keep the balance sheet intact, it is likely to have some cash requirement. And there is an additional complication, in that part of the deal with Novartis involved granting that company a "put option" to sell its 37.5% stake in the consumer joint venture to GlaxoSmithKline at any time, starting on the third anniversary of that deal, coming up next year. Should Novartis decide to exercise the option, the buyout could be a huge cash requirement for Glaxo.The essential dilemma for GlaxoSmithKline investors is that, as of today, the company can't afford the current dividend. And while it probably has the ability to grow into affording it, there are other competing needs for cash. Even if precious capital isn't spent on bolstering the consumer business, the company wants to be ready for an acquisition opportunity to strengthen its drug pipeline, should one appear.GlaxoSmithKline may be able to navigate these waters without lowering the dividend, but it would probably come at the price of passing up opportunities that would ratchet up growth. With the lack of flexibility and uncertainties that come with Glaxo's shortage of cash, conservative investors would be better off ignoring the high yield and putting new money into dividend payers with stronger finances.
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P: V: D:20191021 12:41:30