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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Catco Reinsurance Opportunities Fund Limited LSE:CAT London Ordinary Share BMG1961Q2905 ORD USD0.00013716 (DI)
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 0.315 0.29 0.34 0.315 0.315 0.32 0.00 00:00:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 3.6 -3.8 0.0 - 73

Catco Reinsurance Opport... Share Discussion Threads

Showing 1026 to 1049 of 1350 messages
Chat Pages: Latest  42  41  40  39  38  37  36  35  34  33  32  31  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
15/5/2006
09:00
Could hardly believe my luck and timing when I read in yesterday's Sunday Times that CAT were to be taken-over. After recent purchases in anticipation of a take-over, it is now time to sell for a very nice profit imo, particularly as the general market is collapsing. Cash is king until after the US attack Iran and everything returns to normal again. Good luck everyone. QAZ
qazwsx123
15/5/2006
08:52
All done and dusted, that's why I sold and moved on..
onehanded
15/5/2006
08:45
Any chance of a bidding war or is it done and dusted ?
mtness
15/5/2006
07:31
Have a £2.50 - £2.80 target for Acambis (ACM) and at present £1.78 must be worth a punt put 50% of my money in this one. Rest going to go on holiday. Thanks AZN.
onehanded
15/5/2006
07:24
ACAMBIS (ACM) is next to be taken out in the move by the big boys. Sold and moved into them as a rumour that ACM is already under the take over process. Yipeeee. Come and join me for more profit.
onehanded
15/5/2006
06:20
bid @ c11.50? i havent worked it out exactly!????
tpaulbeaumont
15/5/2006
06:10
£13 .20 yippeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee im holding up from a fiver
marko1961
15/5/2006
05:51
Very surprised to see such a poor following for this share. Congratulations to all who hold.
spyder
14/5/2006
21:27
Very surprised to see such a poor following for this share. Congratulations to all who hold.
spyder
14/5/2006
21:26
Very surprised to see such a poor following for this share. Congratulations to all who hold.
spyder
14/5/2006
19:03
Deal worth >£11
bigfarmer
14/5/2006
19:01
will hit I think you mean!
bigfarmer
14/5/2006
12:46
CAT subject to bid potential by major Pharma, price £600m in today's papers. share price could hit £10 monday if this is the case?
kristini
10/5/2006
17:22
Not sure about that MT. CAT goes through these fairly big swings on its slow way upwards - it can fall quickly too.
graemereid
10/5/2006
13:31
Finally moving up! I'm actually breaking even at last. Very quiet thread. Maybe they've discovered a cure for cancer ! News of something must be leaking to move it up for 2 days running!
mtness
30/3/2006
09:58
Is that as far as you are prepared either to quantify or qualify your argument, Qaz?
matthu
30/3/2006
08:30
I think CAT will slip back down now.
qazwsx123
27/3/2006
11:58
newcomer on the block? PanGenetics BV Closes Series B Financing and Announces Board Appointments UTRECHT, Netherlands and CAMBRIDGE, England, March 27 /PRNewswire/ -- - Dr. Kevin Johnson, Former Cambridge Antibody Technology Executive, Joins as CEO PanGenetics BV, a company devoted to the clinical development of therapeutic antibodies, today announced the closing of an oversubscribed euro 13 million series B round led by ABN AMRO Capital, with participation from Credit Agricole Private Equity and Series A seed investor, Index Ventures. The company also announced the appointment of Dr. Kevin Johnson, former board member and CTO at Cambridge Antibody Technology, as Chief Executive Officer. The funds will enable PanGenetics to continue clinical development of its human CD40 antagonist, PG102, with a view to filing an IND Q1 2007. An earlier version of this antibody has already been in an open label clinical trial, where it showed safety and signs of efficacy. The company will conclude in-licensing of additional drug candidates, as well as hire additional senior management to complement the wealth of antibody development expertise already present in the company. Antibodies have an enviable track record in both safety and return on investment and many of the world's largest biotech companies are now dependent upon them. The financing coincides with the appointment of Dr. Kevin Johnson as CEO. Geert-Jan Mulder, MD of ABN AMRO Capital, and Philippe Guinot, MD, PhD of Credit Agricole Private Equity will join the Supervisory Board. Dr. Johnson, PanGenetics' CEO, said, "I am genuinely delighted to welcome our new investors into the company. Geert-Jan Mulder and Philippe Guinot are both clinicians, making the PanGenetics board unusually well configured for making its most important strategic decisions -- those concerned with clinical development." Geert-Jan Mulder, MD, said, "ABN AMRO Capital, Life Sciences is proud to lead this exciting investment opportunity and confident that the first-rate management team of PanGenetics will build an optimal NRDO (no research development only) strategy towards establishing a new and successful company in the field of antibodies. We aim to build a portfolio that provides future and exciting opportunities for clinicians to treat current unmet medical needs and are delighted to be joined in this investment by such prominent investors as Credit Agricole Private Equity and Index Ventures." About PanGenetics BV PanGenetics is headquartered in Utrecht, The Netherlands with an office near Cambridge in the UK. The company specialises in taking antibodies at the late research stage through to clinical proof of concept. The company employs a lean business model with most development activities outsourced, due to the wealth of specialist providers in Europe. The most advanced candidate is a CD40 antagonist that has already shown promise in an open label phase Ib/IIa Crohns study. The company's Management, Board and Advisors comprise many of the worlds leading antibody developers. Dr. Kevin Johnson, CEO, was a member of the startup team at Cambridge Antibody Technology, where he directed research and new therapeutic product development, including Humira, the first fully human monoclonal antibody drug to reach the market. He was a member of the main Board and part of the management team that listed CAT on the LSE (main market) prior to joining Index Ventures as a Venture Partner. For further information, go to www.pangenetics.com.
matthu
23/3/2006
06:43
Growing firms to claim tax break on innovation Simon Bowers, Thursday March 23, 2006 The Guardian Innovative firms that have grown beyond 250 employees will be able to claim tax breaks on their research and development budgets, the chancellor said yesterday in a measure designed to further foster Britain's creative industries. Tax relief which has proved essential to many small and loss-making research firms is to be extended to larger businesses - but only if Brussels does not regard it as a breach of rules on state aid. In 2001 the government introduced a tax break to encourage R&D, entitling small and medium businesses to offset 150% of related costs - including wage bills and materials - against tax. Loss-making firms, meanwhile, were entitled to claim back 24% of related costs in cash. Limited relief was later extended to larger firms, entitling them to tax relief at 125% of their research and development costs. Yesterday Gordon Brown said the relief enjoyed by small and medium enterprises (defined as firms with up to 250 staff) would be extended to businesses employing up to 500 employees. It is a measure "to boost creative industries from design, architecture and fashion to film and media - soon 10% of our economy - as well as modern manufacturing," he said. Among the biggest beneficiaries could be the research intensive biotech firm Cambridge Antibody Technologies, which has about 300 employees. Its chief financial officer John Aston said the group had £133m of tax losses in its accounts. "We are trying to compete with big pharma, who are able to get tax relief on their R&D costs ... [and against] SMEs, who are able to claim back cash against losses." He said large but loss-making CAT - which is yet to give a target date for reaching profitability - was ineligible for either of these benefits. The group last year spent £39m on research and development, much of which is thought to have been spent on two experimental drugs designed to treat tumours as well as an asthma drug. Most UK drug research firms, however, have smaller workforces than CAT and comfortably qualify for the existing tax break. David Cobb, head of R&D tax services at Deloitte, said extending relief to firms employing up to 500 workers was likely to attract claims from a broad range of industries. "In order simply to stay ahead, most companies, in most sectors, are probably involved in some technological advance - perhaps product development or process improvements through the introduction of a new technology." Xaar, which develops and makes digital inkjet heads for commercial printers, spent £5.5m, or 13% of its turnover, on new product development last year, and has a dedicated 59-strong team working in Cambridge. Much of this budget was spent developing a new printer head which is shortly to go into production at a new plant employing 30 people. Xaar employs 260 people and is expected to benefit from the planned relief extension. The measure had been the subject of much lobbying by the Bioindustry Association and other trade bodies for some time. It was taken up as a central recommendation of the Cox review into Britain's creative industries, published last year. However, the small print of the budget notes makes clear the proposed measure still needs to be signed off as permitted state aid by the European commission. As a result, a start date for the extension of tax relief has not yet been set. In his pre-budget report last December the chancellor indicated a dedicated team would be set up within Revenue and Customs to deal with R&D-related tax claims, which are now expected to mount up rapidly.
matthu
22/3/2006
10:42
Worth a look at another biotech, CEN (current price 7.6p): could be a 5+ bagger this summer, due to expected PIII results followed by a deal or take-over imo.
qazwsx123
18/3/2006
09:54
About monocolnal antibodies from http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-2091767,00.html Stricken drug trial victims will take months to recover By Nigel Hawkes The four volunteers will need specialist treatment to flush the antibodies out of their systems FOUR men involved in a disastrous drug trial are conscious but could face months of slow recovery, doctors said yesterday. The type of drug they were given, a monoclonal antibody, can linger in the system for months, unlike most conventional drugs that are flushed out in days. Doctors at Northwick Park Hospital in Harrow, northwest London, where the men are being treated, have given them blood transfusions to accelerate the removal of the drug, TGN1412, from their bodies. But the antibodies linger in other tissues, so cannot be completely removed in this way. David Glover, a former medical director of Cambridge Antibody Technology, said that the typical half-life of a monoclonal antibody was 14 to 21 days. That meant that in two to three weeks half the drug should disappear. Sometimes, he said, the drugs lingered much longer. "In one trial that we did, we could still detect traces of the drug nine months later," Dr Glover said. "What this means is that if monoclonal antibodies cause problems, they can be very long-lived." Two other men involved in the trial were still critically ill in intensive care yesterday. Relatives of one, Ryan Wilson, said that they had been told that he could be in a medically induced coma for up to a year. All had been healthy volunteers recruited for the first human trials of the drug. They had been promised payments of about £2,000 each. Ganesh Suntharalingam, the clinical director of intensive care at the hospital, said: "Some of them have made noticeable progress in response to our treatment and we have been able to reduce the amount of organ support required. However, it is early days and they will clearly need continued specialist observation for some considerable time. "There are also some very early signs of response to treatment in the most critically ill patients, but I must stress that their condition remains very serious and complex and it would not be sensible to comment on prognosis." He said that an advisory panel was meeting regularly and developing a more detailed understanding of what had happened to the volunteers. In Germany, where the drug was developed, prosecutors were examining whether to start an investigation into the biotech company TeGenero. The body responsible for licensing trials, the PaulEhrlich-Institut, hinted that changes would be needed in the way trials were run. Thomas Hanke, TeGenero's head of research and development, said that it would co-operate with German investigators. "We have no indication that anything went wrong during the production of the agent," he said. "Only an examination of the production process and the substance itself, which was injected, will provide final certainty." Susanne Stöcker, spokeswoman for the Paul-Ehrlich- Institut, said that it was thinking about changing the rules for the first human trials. British experts told The Times this week that it had been a mistake to give the drugs to six volunteers at the same time, but the British regulator, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, has defended the trial. A spokesman said it had reviewed the dossier of data that TeGenero had produced and confirmed all was in order. Given the same data, the agency would approve the trial again, he said. But in an interview with a German radio station, Frau Stöcker said: "We are all going to think about whether to start off with a single person where there is a risk of this kind." The medical research company responsible for the drug trial said that it had followed correct procedures. Herman Scholtz, head of Parexel International Clinical Pharmacology, said: "An initial review at the site to date has shown that best practices were followed and all of the appropriate policies and procedures were adhered to. We commend the staff for their swift reactions with the volunteers when the adverse reaction occurred." LETHAL SEQUENCE 1 Six human volunteers are injected with TGN1412, an experimental drug based on monoclonal antibodies (MABs) 2 The antibodies seek out T cells from the immune system and lock on to the CD28 receptor 3 This triggers production of a cascade of killer T-cells, the warriors of the immune system, in an inflammatory response 4 Killer T-cells normally attack bacteria and virus-infected cells, but here they attack the organs of the body, causing widespread damage. 5 The volunteers are rushed to intensive care and put on life support
matthu
07/3/2006
12:06
Hectorp, How unfortunately prescient of you! I hope the 1000p part of your prediction comes true too, but still along way to get to the £25 bubble price I paid for them!
kingsize
06/3/2006
12:34
CAT may well reach 1000p quite soon, one the current rally has stabilised. Could be more profit-taking short term but from there on up to over 1000p.
hectorp
02/3/2006
19:21
I think CAT has been due a re-pricing for some weeks and the entrance into the 250 prompted interest all round. However, where do we see the next ceiling - we are beyond 2004 so if we see some stability could we go on and see 2003 prices...?
barberg
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