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Phoenix Global. LSE:PGM London Ordinary Share VGG7060R1055 ORD NPV (DI)
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.125p +3.23% 4.00p 3.75p 4.25p 4.00p 3.875p 3.875p 476,658 10:59:28
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Industrial Metals - - - - 9.19

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Date Time Title Posts
16/8/201715:00PGM - Phoenix Global Mining Ltd45
28/2/201223:45The Coming Major PALLADIUM Bull Market of 2008-2021216
26/6/200814:10The Platinum Group Metals Thread176
23/5/200817:56PLATINUM GROUP METALS THREAD137
10/8/200312:06THE PLATINUM GROUP METALS THREAD6

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DateSubject
20/8/2017
09:20
Phoenix Global. Daily Update: Phoenix Global. is listed in the Industrial Metals sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker PGM. The last closing price for Phoenix Global. was 3.88p.
Phoenix Global. has a 4 week average price of 2.75p and a 12 week average price of 2.75p.
The 1 year high share price is 4.50p while the 1 year low share price is currently 2.75p.
There are currently 229,755,522 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 893,002 shares. The market capitalisation of Phoenix Global. is £9,190,220.88.
05/7/2017
07:43
zaphod99: They've been busy! Hopefully this will be the first of many positive updates over the next few months. hTTp://uk.advfn.com/stock-market/london/phoenix-global-PGM/share-news/Phoenix-Global-Mining-Ltd-General-corporate-update/75170495
24/6/2008
11:24
le couteau tombant: I don't completely agree with this, but we must look at both angles, alot of people do not seem to have grasped Palladium Dominance of Petroleum/Gasoline Autocatalysts and Platinum Dominance of Diesel Autocatalysts. Just because I am a Palladium Bull, does not Mean that I am a Platinum Bear at All! http://www.mineweb.com/mineweb/view/mineweb/en/page35?oid=46789&sn=Detail PLATINUM GROUP METALS PGM PRICE RELATIONSHIPS How far can palladium substitute for platinum With the big and rapid increase in platinum prices over the past month, an analyst's thoughts turn to substitution, and here some of the likelihoods of increased palladium for platinum substitution in the catalyst and jewellery sectors are examined. Author: Rhona O'Connell Posted: Wednesday , 13 Feb 2008 LONDON - After the dramatic spikes in the precious metals sector in 1979 and 1980, it took six years for gold jewellery demand to return to 1978 levels, and silver took considerably longer, with industrial demand (including jewellery) not regaining 1978 levels until 1990, a full decade after the price hike that carried gold to $850 and silver to $50. What is thus the prognosis for platinum this time around? The frenetic activity in the platinum market with prices continuing to register new records means that, despite the fact that palladium is being pulled along in platinum's wake; the price differential between the two has now exceeded $1,500. Put another way, platinum is now almost 4.5 times as expensive as palladium and the word "substitution" is on many lips. The obvious areas for substitution are the jewellery sector, and emission control catalysts. Both of these sectors have been looking at the interplay between the two metals for a number of years and in the automotive sector in particular engineers are constantly looking for ways to maximise catalyst efficiency while minimising costs. Back in 2000 and 2001 palladium rocketed to more than $1,000 an ounce when automotive manufacturers in North America were panicking over a potential shortage of metal. Palladium reached a maximum premium over platinum of $475 on 26th January. Over the preceding year platinum prices rose by 34% while those of palladium by 124%. The result was renewed efforts to shift back towards platinum in the automotive sector, although the pattern was different with respect to jewellery, where outright prices were playing more of a role than the proportional difference between the two. GFMS Ltd reports that industrial demand for palladium in 2000 was 9.6 million ounces (298 tonnes), with emission control catalysts accounting for 6.0 million ounces or 63% of total. Note that GFMS records "consumption" whereas the Johnson Matthey figures refer to sales into the industry and so the parameters are slightly different, with inventory shifts marking the major difference between the two sets of figures. Palladium demand since then has dropped to approximately eight million ounces per annum, with offtake in emission control catalysts falling to 4.1 million ounces in 2005 before starting to increase once more. The drop in palladium usage in emission control catalysts between 2000 and 2005 was thus 31% or an annual average of almost 8% per annum. This is despite the fact that the number of vehicles fitted with emission control catalysts increased by 14% overall, or an average of 2.6% per annum over the period. Platinum demand in emission control catalyst over the same period rose from 2.2 million ounces to almost four million ounces and has continued to expand since. This is not only a function of platinum re-substituting in part for palladium, but also due to the fact that diesel vehicles have been taking an increasing proportion of the global fleet and, until recently, emission control for diesel-powered vehicles was the exclusive domain of platinum. In 2000, diesel accounted for only 18% of global production of light vehicles, and for 19% of catalyst-bearing vehicles. By 2007, diesel accounted for 24% of total and 25% of catalyst-bearing vehicles. The geographic split of this is also interesting with Europe well and truly in the vanguard with respect to diesel vehicles. In 2000, diesel accounted for 37% of light vehicle production, but in 2007 it absorbed approximately 51% of total. The headway in the gasoline sector in China means that diesel share has actually dropped over the period, from 21% to 16%. In Japan the share is less than 10% while in North America it is less than 5% - although this us up from less than 2% in 2000. The balance between palladium and platinum usage in diesel is changing, with advances in fuel technology now meaning that palladium can substitute for platinum (up to about 25% of total) in catalysts for diesel-powered engines, and the recent relative price performance for the two metals is virtually guaranteed to ensure that this work will continue. Furthermore the massive increases in gasoline prices has, as well as resulting in consumers looking in part, for smaller vehicles than hitherto when changing their cars, meant that diesel is now taking more of a foothold in north America than previously and the 5% figure noted above can be expected to increase. All of this points to a resurgence in palladium demand at the expense of platinum. Although we have noted that this trend is already underway, however, it is important not to get too carried away by the speed with which this substitution will have an impact on the market. New designs for emission control catalysts frequently require new engine calibration and certification and this can take months. There was already likely to be a notable increase in palladium usage in diesel emission control catalysts; this is likely to be extended in 2009 as a result of price shifts. The jewellery sector is more rapidly responsive to price exchanges although as noted above this tends to be more a function of outright prices rather than relative performance. Absolute high prices across the precious metals spectrum are likely to impinge on jewellery demand in all metals this year, and the platinum price romping towards $2,000 is likely to have a substantial effect on platinum jewellery demand. Palladium is likely to take an increased market share at platinum's expense, but the market itself is likely to be smaller as a result of consumer resistance. The one area that is likely to remain resilient is the market for wedding bands, especially in Asia. Platinum jewellery demand reached a peak in 2002, driven by burgeoning interest in China and reaching almost three million ounces or 39% of total industrial demand of 2.8 million ounces. Palladium demand in the jewellery sector stood at that point at 337,000 ounces. Platinum demand has tapered off since, dropping below 1.8 million ounces while palladium offtake has increased towards one million ounces. Platinum jewellery usage has therefore declined by roughly one million ounces per annum while that of palladium has increased by more than 600,000 ounces. Palladium pieces are typically lighter than those of platinum, so palladium's encroachment in terms of the number of pieces is likely to be higher than these bald tonnage figures would suggest. Global jewellery platinum demand is currently equivalent to roughly 22% of platinum demand and 12% of palladium demand. With South African platinum supplies likely to be restricted by anything up to 300,000 ounces this year, (dependent upon the analysis that one chooses to read) as a result of the power supply problems, then all other things being equal, i.e. if jewellery demand were the only variable in the equation, it would have to contract by almost 20% in 2008 in order to offset the reduction in primary supply of refined metal. Furthermore ETF demand is likely to remain strong. Demand so far this year in the London-based platinum ETF has been 123,000 ounces, taking holdings up by 88% over the past six weeks. This is hardly likely to be sustained throughout the year as a whole, but it already points to sustained tightness in the platinum market. While it is too early yet to quantify the absolute shifts within the platinum and palladium markets this year, we can be reasonably sure that platinum prices will remain high and that jewellery demand will suffer. The cautionary note, of course, is that when the market rids itself of this tightness then there is scope for plenty of profit taking and this, on the back of a weakened jewellery market, is likely to lead to falls every bit as rapid as their recent rise.
16/6/2008
14:14
le couteau tombant: http://www.mineweb.com/mineweb/view/mineweb/en/page35?oid=46789&sn=Detail PLATINUM GROUP METALS PGM PRICE RELATIONSHIPS How far can palladium substitute for platinum With the big and rapid increase in platinum prices over the past month, an analyst's thoughts turn to substitution, and here some of the likelihoods of increased palladium for platinum substitution in the catalyst and jewellery sectors are examined. Author: Rhona O'Connell Posted: Wednesday , 13 Feb 2008 LONDON - After the dramatic spikes in the precious metals sector in 1979 and 1980, it took six years for gold jewellery demand to return to 1978 levels, and silver took considerably longer, with industrial demand (including jewellery) not regaining 1978 levels until 1990, a full decade after the price hike that carried gold to $850 and silver to $50. What is thus the prognosis for platinum this time around? The frenetic activity in the platinum market with prices continuing to register new records means that, despite the fact that palladium is being pulled along in platinum's wake; the price differential between the two has now exceeded $1,500. Put another way, platinum is now almost 4.5 times as expensive as palladium and the word "substitution" is on many lips. The obvious areas for substitution are the jewellery sector, and emission control catalysts. Both of these sectors have been looking at the interplay between the two metals for a number of years and in the automotive sector in particular engineers are constantly looking for ways to maximise catalyst efficiency while minimising costs. Back in 2000 and 2001 palladium rocketed to more than $1,000 an ounce when automotive manufacturers in North America were panicking over a potential shortage of metal. Palladium reached a maximum premium over platinum of $475 on 26th January. Over the preceding year platinum prices rose by 34% while those of palladium by 124%. The result was renewed efforts to shift back towards platinum in the automotive sector, although the pattern was different with respect to jewellery, where outright prices were playing more of a role than the proportional difference between the two. GFMS Ltd reports that industrial demand for palladium in 2000 was 9.6 million ounces (298 tonnes), with emission control catalysts accounting for 6.0 million ounces or 63% of total. Note that GFMS records "consumption" whereas the Johnson Matthey figures refer to sales into the industry and so the parameters are slightly different, with inventory shifts marking the major difference between the two sets of figures. Palladium demand since then has dropped to approximately eight million ounces per annum, with offtake in emission control catalysts falling to 4.1 million ounces in 2005 before starting to increase once more. The drop in palladium usage in emission control catalysts between 2000 and 2005 was thus 31% or an annual average of almost 8% per annum. This is despite the fact that the number of vehicles fitted with emission control catalysts increased by 14% overall, or an average of 2.6% per annum over the period. Platinum demand in emission control catalyst over the same period rose from 2.2 million ounces to almost four million ounces and has continued to expand since. This is not only a function of platinum re-substituting in part for palladium, but also due to the fact that diesel vehicles have been taking an increasing proportion of the global fleet and, until recently, emission control for diesel-powered vehicles was the exclusive domain of platinum. In 2000, diesel accounted for only 18% of global production of light vehicles, and for 19% of catalyst-bearing vehicles. By 2007, diesel accounted for 24% of total and 25% of catalyst-bearing vehicles. The geographic split of this is also interesting with Europe well and truly in the vanguard with respect to diesel vehicles. In 2000, diesel accounted for 37% of light vehicle production, but in 2007 it absorbed approximately 51% of total. The headway in the gasoline sector in China means that diesel share has actually dropped over the period, from 21% to 16%. In Japan the share is less than 10% while in North America it is less than 5% - although this us up from less than 2% in 2000. The balance between palladium and platinum usage in diesel is changing, with advances in fuel technology now meaning that palladium can substitute for platinum (up to about 25% of total) in catalysts for diesel-powered engines, and the recent relative price performance for the two metals is virtually guaranteed to ensure that this work will continue. Furthermore the massive increases in gasoline prices has, as well as resulting in consumers looking in part, for smaller vehicles than hitherto when changing their cars, meant that diesel is now taking more of a foothold in north America than previously and the 5% figure noted above can be expected to increase. All of this points to a resurgence in palladium demand at the expense of platinum. Although we have noted that this trend is already underway, however, it is important not to get too carried away by the speed with which this substitution will have an impact on the market. New designs for emission control catalysts frequently require new engine calibration and certification and this can take months. There was already likely to be a notable increase in palladium usage in diesel emission control catalysts; this is likely to be extended in 2009 as a result of price shifts. The jewellery sector is more rapidly responsive to price exchanges although as noted above this tends to be more a function of outright prices rather than relative performance. Absolute high prices across the precious metals spectrum are likely to impinge on jewellery demand in all metals this year, and the platinum price romping towards $2,000 is likely to have a substantial effect on platinum jewellery demand. Palladium is likely to take an increased market share at platinum's expense, but the market itself is likely to be smaller as a result of consumer resistance. The one area that is likely to remain resilient is the market for wedding bands, especially in Asia. Platinum jewellery demand reached a peak in 2002, driven by burgeoning interest in China and reaching almost three million ounces or 39% of total industrial demand of 2.8 million ounces. Palladium demand in the jewellery sector stood at that point at 337,000 ounces. Platinum demand has tapered off since, dropping below 1.8 million ounces while palladium offtake has increased towards one million ounces. Platinum jewellery usage has therefore declined by roughly one million ounces per annum while that of palladium has increased by more than 600,000 ounces. Palladium pieces are typically lighter than those of platinum, so palladium's encroachment in terms of the number of pieces is likely to be higher than these bald tonnage figures would suggest. Global jewellery platinum demand is currently equivalent to roughly 22% of platinum demand and 12% of palladium demand. With South African platinum supplies likely to be restricted by anything up to 300,000 ounces this year, (dependent upon the analysis that one chooses to read) as a result of the power supply problems, then all other things being equal, i.e. if jewellery demand were the only variable in the equation, it would have to contract by almost 20% in 2008 in order to offset the reduction in primary supply of refined metal. Furthermore ETF demand is likely to remain strong. Demand so far this year in the London-based platinum ETF has been 123,000 ounces, taking holdings up by 88% over the past six weeks. This is hardly likely to be sustained throughout the year as a whole, but it already points to sustained tightness in the platinum market. While it is too early yet to quantify the absolute shifts within the platinum and palladium markets this year, we can be reasonably sure that platinum prices will remain high and that jewellery demand will suffer. The cautionary note, of course, is that when the market rids itself of this tightness then there is scope for plenty of profit taking and this, on the back of a weakened jewellery market, is likely to lead to falls every bit as rapid as their recent rise.
05/6/2006
13:59
smilewithme: FRA could begin mine with 250 workers – local press http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/14742124.htm Grandforks Herald June 5th Mining boom anticipated on the Iron Range BOB KELLEHER Minnesota Public Radio "The list keeps going - in a couple of years, Franconia Minerals could begin its underground copper/nickel mine with another 250 workers" What other mining junior (with such a low market capitalision and such tremendous upside) is at this stage i.e. moving towards a mine? Also interesting to note that Polymet Mining are mentioned in the same article: "PolyMet Mining Corp. is close to a decision on a copper/nickel mine near Hoyt Lakes. That's 400 permanent jobs for at least 20 years - in addition to construction and spinoff jobs" As I have posted earlier: With news due any day on Franconia's Maturi resource, consider how Polymet Mining have performed over the past few years – both companies are drilling in same area – Polymet is ahead in terms of progress but as Franconia catch up, expect to see a ten bagger! As far as I can see, that seems to be the only difference between the two companies, (apart from the fact that Franconia has several other major projects elsewhere in the US – zinc in San Francisco, copper at Red Knoll etc. And perhaps that explains Franconias slower progress at Birch Lake – they have a lot of other things happening too! Following Franconia's own suggestion that they and Polymet Mining are peers (as described in their Corporate Presentation http://www.franconiaminerals.com/s/Presentations.asp , I took a look at Polymet. Franconia and PolyMet Mining are listed on the same exchange and are mining in the same area as described in earlier post/ article – they are only separated by several miles as shown: Today, PolyMet's market capitalisation is around 500 million dollars. (£250 million) Franconia's is around 20 million dollars. (£10 million) As the two year chart below shows, a year ago PolyMet – were around 50 cents but now are over four dollars (at time of writing) – the share price suddenly took off (in reponse to results, progress etc). PolyMet continue to make excellent progress. Today, Franconia are around 60 cents (30p equivalent in Toronto, 30p on Ofex).........in a year they will be......the sky's the limit...... Smilewithme
24/3/2005
19:17
blank frank: Hi Mikkydhu, Totally agree with you about Franconia Minerals: this company looks to me to be sheer class, and the share superb value for money. Since you last wrote, Roscoe Postle Associates have confirmed the Birch Lake resource estimate, and the company has dual-listed on the TSX-V in Canada. But this progress doesn't seem to be reflected in the FRA share price yet (allowing for its five-into-one consolidation late last year), although that could soon change. Date: February 23, 2005 Franconia Minerals Gets New Lease Of Life Now It Is Listed In Canada As Well As On Ofex. http://www.minesite.com/storyFull.php?storySeq=594 Franconia January 2005 corporate presentation: http://www.franconiaminerals.com/s/presentations.asp Franconia February 2005 Bull & Bear corporate profile: http://www.franconiaminerals.com/s/CorporateProfile.asp http://www.franconiaminerals.com/i/pdf/2005-02_BullnBear.pdf Current FRA share prices:- OFEX: 19.25p (market capitalisation £3.5M.) TSX-V: 43c. (market capitalisation CDN$7.81M.) [FRA is I believe the first and only company to dual-list on these two exchanges.] With new placing funds currently being raised, and depending upon FRA's costs, income and priorities, I believe that there could be three sizeable sets of FRA drilling results in 2005, all of which could be very impressive:- • San Francisco zinc property (5 drill holes to complete first phase). • Birch Lake platinum property. (C. 10 - 20 drill holes?). • Mahoney zinc property. (8 drill holes in first phase.) [FRA's 10/04 prospectus doesn't identify monies for Mahoney drilling, but the 2/05 Bull & Bear report on FRA suggests that it could become a joint venture (post-drilling) this year.] I share FRA boss Brian Gavin's optimism that one or more of FRA's projects will become joint ventures this year: San Francisco and Mahoney. B.F.
20/8/2003
19:19
energyandnrg: >Lonmin's platinum predicament By: Ken Gooding Posted: 2003/08/20 Wed 17:59 ZE2 | © Mineweb 1997-2003 LONDON – A superficial glance makes it seem that Lonmin's (LSE:LMI) plan to get Australia's first platinum group metals (pgm) project up and running is a disaster. The failure of the scheme to meet its commercial objectives should also hang heavy on Anglo Pacific Group (LSE:APF), the London based mini mining house, that has about £700,000 riding on the project. Yet Brian Wides, Anglo Pacific's finance director, remains enthusiastic about the prospects for Platinum Australia (ASX:PLA), the company that owns the Panton platinum-palladium project in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. Lonmin owns 44 percent of PLA while Anglo Pacific has about 11 percent. PLA's share price just about halved after it announced that a feasibility study showed the Panton project "is technically sound but not commercially viable at the current metal prices and exchange rates." Wides says: "If we could buy the rest of Platinum Australia at today's prices we would write the cheque like a shot. We are still very excited about it." He insists the project has not been halted but just paused. "I think it was a marginal call and I don't think it will be on pause for long." In the meantime it seems that PLA's best chance of some cash flow might be from selling technology developed with Lonmin to some of South Africa's putative platinum metals producers. PLA and Lonmin have developed a new metallurgical process to recover pgms from the Panton deposit. The process is based on calcine leaching technology long used in a number of Western Australian gold mines. This process eliminates the smelting stage and aims to produce a high grade concentrate suitable for delivery direct to the precious metal refinery. While it is not suitable for all types of pgm deposits, there are some that might benefit. PLA says it will now "focus on commercialisation of the new metallurgical process through participation in development of pgm projects and on other exploration projects in Western Australia" It suggests that "the current rapid expansion of the pgm industry in South Africa offers the best potential in this regard" and says it will focus on South Africa as the market for commercialisation of the new process. PLA is having talks with a number of organisations involved in the South African pgm industry. So what has gone wrong in Australia? PLA says it was victim of a combination of the strength of the Australian dollar against the US currency and a fall in pgm prices. These combined to virtually halve the projected revenue from the Panton project. During the time it took to produce the feasibility study the palladium price fell from more than US$600/oz to under $200/oz – an important consideration as the Panton reef is about 50-50 platinum and palladium – and the Aussie dollar strengthened from 52 US cents to 65 cents. PLA says the impact of these changes was partly offset by an increase in the average grade of the Top Reef resource at Panton to 6.1 grams of pgm and gold a tonne and the increased value of the final product as a result of the successful development of the new metallurgical process. But, although the value of the final product was raised by nearly 30 percent, this was not enough to overcome the near-50 percent fall in projected revenue resulting from metal price and exchange rate changes. Anglo Pacific's Wides remains convinced that Panton will eventually provide Australia with its first pgm producers. He says the deposit is by far the best in that country with resources of 4.5m ounces. "A reasonable dollar exchange rate and an increase in the palladium price would see it rolling again." Anglo Pacific, which has full London and Australian stock exchange listings, has been around for many years and was easy to ignore. It was collecting royalties from two mines operated by Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton in Queensland, Australia, and had some other assets in Scotland and British Columbia. It usually paid a dividend out of royalty cash flow. Now the company is becoming more aggressive. Anglo Pacific's revised corporate strategy is to acquire strategic holdings in mining companies that have substantial potential to boost their resources or levels of production. It is not interested in early stage exploration or in companies operating outside first world countries. It looks for minimal political risk. Peter Boycott, Anglo Pacific's chairman, says the company prefers to go into situations where it knows the directors personally "and then we stand there to help." In June last year it ordered an independent valuation of its royalties and this suggested they were worth £32m. Since then there have been further investments and Anglo Pacific's share price has moved steadily up from a lost of 27p to a peak of 41p. The news about the Australian set-back did nothing to dent this progress and today the price is 39p to give Anglo Pacific a market value of about £33m.
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