Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Woodford Patient Capital Trust Plc LSE:WPCT London Ordinary Share GB00BVG1CF25 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -1.00p -2.94% 33.00p 32.95p 33.50p 33.60p 32.80p 33.05p 3,073,260 16:28:58
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 0.0 -3.8 -0.5 - 300

Woodford Patient Capital Share Discussion Threads

Showing 10201 to 10222 of 11125 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
30/8/2019
06:52
From IC, Woody has been reading the Mushroom Growers' Manual: LF Woodford Equity Income (GB00BLRZQB71) has stopped publishing its 10 largest holdings and will not disclose these again until it resumes trading, expected to be in December. This sets it apart from the vast majority of other funds available to UK private investors, nearly all of which disclose their 10 largest holdings. At a time when the fund's manager, Neil Woodford, is selling holdings to reposition this fund, such disclosures can leave it vulnerable to other investors looking to buy its holdings cheaply or bet on their prices falling. "During the period of the suspension and subsequent repositioning of its portfolio, Woodford Investment Management will no longer publish details of the holdings in [LF Woodford Equity Income Fund],” said Link Fund Solutions, the fund's authorised corporate director, in an update on 23 August. “The interim report and accounts of the fund to 30 June 2019 will include a list of holdings as at that date. It is firmly believed that this is in the best interests of investors." Zero effect on Woody-tracking hedge funds who can view earlier lists and track RNSs.
jonwig
29/8/2019
23:40
Passive investing has been around for ages, vanguard in America started by John Bogle first launched in 1974. Buffet is on record a saying that if he was starting a pension plan now, he would use passive low cost trackers such as vanguard, and as we all know it the charges that rip the heart out of returns. The trouble is in the UK passive tracker funds don't get their expense ratios down to Vanguard levels and there are many "active" funds that are actually closet trackers but with high charges. Most managers don't and can't beat the indices..a low cost tracker is the best approach for 90% of investors, i do my own thing and have massive positions in my pension in companies like Shell, Microsoft and IMB great if it goes well , pants if one falls out of bed. I got into IMB recently when woodford was selling so i have great average, poor woodford investors have paid for it.
hernando2
29/8/2019
23:33
But passive investing across indexes is a relatively new concept. Passive investing doesn't care about any RNS news of a profit warning or profit upgrade, or a broker recommendation, or any other indicator. It just replicates the index in percentage terms. If everyone 'goes passive' then everything will move together in unison. That must be a flawed system.
chinahere
29/8/2019
22:58
chinahere - a good article in rebuttal: Most of the people referring to passive investing as a bubble have not accurately described the way in which it represents a bubble. What they’re really saying is that it is popular. So is shopping online and using Instagram and eating Mexican food. These things aren’t “bubbles.̶1; The real bubble is in actively managed funds. If you owned individual stocks in the 30’s, 40’s, 50’s, 60’s, 70’s, it was because you were in the upper class or you had a savvy parent or grandparent that had accumulated these investments. From 1987 through 2007, we had a twenty year bubble in investor preference for active managers and stockpicking as a sport and investing as a hobby. Stock-picking fund managers became household names. Celebrities began appearing in television commercials for do-it-yourself online brokerages, promoting a message that even truck drivers could one day buy their own island and anyone who wanted to begin trading stocks could one day become rich. Movie stars, tennis pros, famous basketball coaches and even Jackie Chan appeared in these spots for Ameritrade, Schwab, eTrade, Fidelity, etc. And then it fall came crashing down as the millennium rolled over. Whatever enthusiasm the dot com bust didn’t destroy in 2000-2002, the Great Financial Crisis would finish off just a few years later. By 2009, the Boomers were ten to fifteen years removed from the heyday of enjoyable active management and they were done with it. The active management bubble produced massive asset management companies that have been shrinking every year, despite the rise of both the bond and stock markets over the last decade. They are declining in headcount, advertising spend, product offering, investor awareness and prominence. None of this is abnormal – they were mostly too big in the first place, the beneficiaries of a bubble environment that hasn’t existed for over ten years now. The twenty year period from 1987-2007 was the real aberration. What’s happening now is a reversion to normalcy.
daffyjones
29/8/2019
22:30
I was reading that passive trackers are getting so popular that large caps are being supported regardless and smaller overlooked shares are being ignored. Liquidity is also starting to dry-up during the day with a large amount of the trading coming from passive trackers adjusting later in the trading day. It is growing, but imagine if the majority of people start to use passive trackers - there would be far less price discovery. Failing companies would be supported regardless and successful companies wouldn't have their share price increased. A bubble in the making and an opportunity for us PIs? Any comments?
chinahere
29/8/2019
20:27
Interesting list. Laura Foll and James Henderson are good value investors with a proven long term record. It just shows how out of favour the value style is. The big question is which of these are irreversibly impaired. For what it’s worth, I think all but Woodford will bounce back, if they are not sacked before they get a chance to! Invesco are at risk of the Woodford connection though and so they could be in trouble as well.
topvest
29/8/2019
17:59
@ blippy - yup, we're on his case there!
jonwig
29/8/2019
17:44
Today I Learned that Woodford invested in a cold fusion company (Industrial Heat). Seems like a complete scam to me. Why Woodford would go anywhere near this kind of dross baffles me. It will NEVER make any money.
blippy3
29/8/2019
16:55
RCT, Yes, he's got sociopathic tendencies. Lack of conscience and self awareness. It's a very interesting case study, as was Madoff.
simon gordon
29/8/2019
14:43
Holy smoke, what a pair! Rank 107/108 Equity - UK Equity Income Manager Return 104 Laura Foll -10.1% 104 James Henderson -10.1% 106 Thomas Moore -10.1% 107 Mark Barnett -10.6% 108 Neil Woodford -22.3%
andy
29/8/2019
14:09
Ha ha he must be dreading Woody's defenestration, 107th out of 107 then.. I still say he's the elephant in the room, notwithstanding that his Top 10's tend to be the very large, very steady stuff he only ought to be investing in.
spectoacc
29/8/2019
14:08
Mark Barnett 107 out of 108 For UK Equity Income. the 3 year and 5 year are no better.
cc2014
29/8/2019
13:51
At what point do idiots like Barnett stop investing in the vast amount of utter tosh that gets brought to market. Don't think he had any Aston Martin but another perfect example. Trouble is - isn't their money.
spectoacc
29/8/2019
13:36
Amigo now down 40%. From the BBC According to Bloomberg data, the biggest institutional investors with Amigo include Invesco, which owns about 67m shares, or 14% of the firm; JPMorgan with 1.8%; Miton Group with 1.6% and Vanguard with 1.1%. Naturally, Neil Woodford's firm owns a stake, but according to the data Woodford Investment Management did recently sell almost half its shareholding, leaving it with just 0.8%. Invesco, however, recently added 18.6m shares. It booked a paper loss of about £47m today. Its founder James Benamor is not unscathed. His Richmond Group owns 288m shares, or 61%. Today's loss for him is about £200m. Again, a paper loss which could recover. When he and other managers listed the company last year, they sold a 25% stake for about £327m, and so will not go hungry.
cc2014
29/8/2019
12:59
Sam Vaknin is an interesting guy to observe on YouTube. He's a self confessed narcissist. He thinks narcissism and psychopathy are blending to bring about a new personality disorder: Trump being a prime example. Here he is on the differences between narcissism and psychopathy: Https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VXdW6KlwCM
simon gordon
29/8/2019
12:56
RCT, So, a narcissist?
simon gordon
29/8/2019
11:18
I strongly recommend reading "Mistakes were made (but not by me)". hxxps://www.amazon.co.uk/Mistakes-Were-Made-But-Not/dp/0544574788 A great book and fits Woodford to a tee. Doesn't make him a psychopath though.
rcturner2
29/8/2019
09:13
Yes think he's only a few left. Invesco (as per usual) a heavy holder (10%).
spectoacc
29/8/2019
09:09
"Under 5%" on 8 July.
jonwig
29/8/2019
08:38
AMGO - is he selling down or sold out? Thanks
pictureframe
29/8/2019
08:22
Yoda ---- my favorite character was
buywell2
29/8/2019
08:20
Shares in loan sharks AMGO, a heavy Woodford holding, down 25% this morning after releasing their results. Profits down due to increasing loan impairments and the FCA clamping down on their cruel business model. EDIT: now down over 40%
daffyjones
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