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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Symphony Environmental Technologies Plc LSE:SYM London Ordinary Share GB0009589168 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -0.50 -3.08% 15.75 15.50 16.00 17.00 15.75 17.00 362,769 14:00:29
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Chemicals 8.2 -0.7 -0.4 - 27

Symphony Environmental T... Share Discussion Threads

Showing 5576 to 5597 of 6425 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
12/7/2018
14:31
Yes - it will be a starch based material, of which there are several makers in Europe - Novamont(Italy) being the best known. The are certified to DIN 13432. OXO degradable types are not - but never claim to be anyway, different mechanism. Composting is great - but you have to get the used/ waste bag to the composting site - and therein is the problem...identifying and collecting such waste. Very little support for composting anything other than garden waste in this country. Even if you do collect it, that it is arguably of little benefit - all a compost heap does is turn this starch plastic into CO2 - a greenhouse gas. The argument goes that at least this CO2 has come from a crop (Maize or potatoes) and so is new Carbon, part of a large loop as you grow Maize for the next batch. Whereas a degradable OXO bag (when / if it does degrade) would be putting old carbon (from oil or gas used to make the PolyEthylene) back into the air. But it has done a useful job (a bag) in the meantime. These are not simple arguments to resolve.
heeley3
12/7/2018
12:13
If the SYM webside is correct d2w-treated bags decay like a leaf. Leaves do not disappear into thin air, and when dry would I guess make excellent mouse nests, but in a year or two are assimilated as gas and organic ‘dust’ into soil or environment. Perhaps SYM are indeed being economical with the facts. I noticed recently that in French supermarkets the throw-away plastic bags for diy fruit and veg packing are labelled as compostible. They are made of very thin and soft, but quite strong, translucent plastic which is rather better than the equivalent U.K. offering. Does anyone know what this material is and where it comes from?
dozey3
12/7/2018
11:09
Heeley in 5574 is correct on what d2w treated bags degrade to. It doesn't just disappear into thin air, it breaks down into small pieces & what you are left with looks something like a mouse nest, arguably creating more of a mess than a single plastic bag. Not much of a worry now in the UK since the 5p charge on carrier bags was introduced & the roughly 95% drop off in their use. It doesn't work in water or when buried.
neilrr
12/7/2018
10:59
Heeley3 - worth looking at this challenge and rebuke to EU findings - https://www.plasticstoday.com/sustainability/oxo-biodegradable-plastics-federation-challenges-european-commission-report/28951447258282
breggsit
11/7/2018
11:26
On wrong bulletin board - see SOPHEON (SPE). Apologies!
breggsit
11/7/2018
10:20
Problem is - there is little evidence ever given for the eventual degradation and I have found nothing to back up that it ever would in seawater .... it is pointedly unlikely to degrade in cold and wet conditions. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/cif-green/2009/jun/18/greenwash-biodegradeable-plastic-bags The Wiki page on OXO degradables points out studies that show that it does degrade as claimed and also EU work that shows that it does not. Which all goes to my point - the product is controversial and as you can see the company has a record of getting product into places, only to be thrown out later as doubts are raised. This makes it hard for sales growth to stick. I am a realist -I think the product is great at what it does (potentially reduce a littering problem) but as I said earlier it is not in my view an answer to the world plastic problem. Recently I came across this: hxxps://www.european-bioplastics.org/eu-takes-action-against-oxo-degradable-plastics/
heeley3
10/7/2018
11:13
From SYM website: “... It [d2w] converts everyday plastic products (made from PE or PP)at the end of their useful life in the presence of oxygen into materials which degrade, and then biodegrade in the open environment in the same way as a leaf and leaving nothing behind - no toxic residues OR FRAGMENTS OF PLASTICS.” Shout is for the benefit of the deramper above.
dozey3
10/7/2018
11:08
Picked up more here. These aint for day trading dudes.Buy and hold till Sept/Oct.Hoping for 50/100%
maccamcd
10/7/2018
09:48
Sym have yet to make a case that their product has anything to contribute to the great plastics 'debate'. Making a product that is designed to and deliberately breaks down into microplastics is hard sell. Do some research and you will see that it is deeply controversial. So they make a product that might help with littering in western societies, but is not going to help the plastics in the ocean debate. The plastics fragments in the ocean has not come, in the main, from plastic bags. Nor has it come, in the main, from 1st world countries with good (or at least 1/2 functioning) waste collection and management practices. The few bags made from this material that I had in my cupboard (I think they had a Coop deal a while back) are breaking down, and a right mess they make too!
heeley3
09/7/2018
21:28
Was it about his bonus 💩
swiss paul
08/7/2018
17:17
Apparently Ian Bristow has been heard singing 'it's coming home' in the bath recently...
maccamcd
06/7/2018
22:18
what makes you so sure? They are all old and staid and happy to take whatever comes along, just look at the chart above - woeful
swiss paul
06/7/2018
11:53
gonna drift up and then hopefully a boom when we get next update.. Impossible for SYM to not have positivity going on inside the organisation, both sales and corporate potential.
maccamcd
05/7/2018
19:30
still drifting down and woeful
swiss paul
05/7/2018
13:28
thanks maccamcd .. I remember now. It was Eastern company who got in a placing during one of the previous spikes. Good news if the they are now bugging out. Just a temporary overhang
mattjos
05/7/2018
08:22
Hoping to see 20p hold EOD.
john henry
05/7/2018
08:12
Chart looking dreadful here - 15p looks a target to me
spawny100
02/7/2018
12:45
nibbling on a few more today
mattjos
22/6/2018
09:14
Really RPC whose share price has bombed due to the plastics furore should use a tiny proportion of its ready cash to mop up SYM and take us out of our misery. RPC are masters at innovation and would put a much needed rocket behind the use and development of dpd products. Wouldn’t do their market image any harm either.
dozey3
22/6/2018
07:45
Investors Demand Nestle, Pepsi and Others Cut Plastic Use (1)Thursday, June 21, 2018 08:11 PM By Emily Chasan(Bloomberg) --A group of 25 investors managing more than $1 trillion in assets are demanding that Nestle SA, PepsiCo Inc., Procter & Gamble Co. and Unilever NV reduce their use of plastic packaging, calling it environmentally damaging.The initiative was organized by As You Sow, a nonprofit shareholder advocacy group that pushes companies to act responsibly. It was signed by investment managers including Hermes Investment Management, Impax Asset Management, NEI Investments and Walden Asset Management."Without fundamental redesign and innovation, about 30 percent of plastic packaging will never be reused or recycled," the investors said in their letter. "These materials can persist in the environment, partially degraded, for hundreds of years, which, as well as causing damage to marine life, could also have a material impact by exposing companies to reputational damage."The group is asking the companies to disclose annual plastic packaging use, set plastic use reduction goals, facilitate recycling and transition to recyclable, reusable or compostable packaging as much as possible.The investors said they want to push the companies to hold to those promises after five of the Group of Seven nations, excluding the U.S. and Japan, adopted a charter aimed at significantly reducing single-use plastic by 2040.Similarly, Nestle, PepsiCo and Unilever have pledged to make packaging more recyclable, compostable, biodegradable and from higher recycled content by 2025.P&G aims to reduce its plastic packaging by 20 percent by 2020 and about 90 percent of its packaging is already recyclable. "We agree we must be part of the solution to reduce plastic waste," the company said in an emailed statement."We share concerns about the growing accumulation of packaging waste and the need to do something to minimize its impact on the environment," Nestle said in a statement. The company said it has already eliminated more than 100,000 tons of packaging materials from its production processes through last year, under existing environmental projects.Pepsi and Unilever didn't immediately respond to requests for comment.
maccamcd
15/6/2018
08:45
Sold my last lot this morning.gla
volsung
13/6/2018
22:09
Actually nearer 20%. Bought at 38p now 31p to sell. Not my best investment decision
volsung
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