Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Serabi Gold Plc LSE:SRB London Ordinary Share GB00BG5NDX91 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 82.00p 80.00p 84.00p 82.00p 82.00p 82.00p 965 08:00:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Mining 33.9 -3.8 -8.8 - 48

Serabi Gold Share Discussion Threads

Showing 7476 to 7498 of 9775 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
06/6/2019
15:31
Gold up another 7 USD currently. Comeon Serabi :-D
gregpeck7
06/6/2019
11:40
Money Week - What drives the gold price: Well, we might not get either of these. We might get a loose Fed and a plain old ropey economy, rather than the downright 2008-style relapse that lots of people still seem to expect. Let’s turn to my favourite yellow metal to think this through. Gold surged yesterday for a reason. People talk about gold being driven by “safe-haven221; demand, or geopolitical uncertainty, or general “inflationR21;. There’s an element of truth in all of those, but they’re also not very helpful. The thing that primarily drives gold is the direction of “real” interest rates – in other words, interest rates after you take account of inflation. If real rates are rising, gold hates it. If real rates are falling, gold loves it. So the following scenarios (falling real rates) are good for gold: 1. Falling interest rates and rising or static inflation. 2. Rates rising, but inflation rising faster. 3. Falling inflation, but with rates being cut even faster. And the opposite scenarios (rising real rates) are bad for gold: 1. Rising interest rates and falling or static inflation. 2. Rates rising more rapidly than inflation. 3. Rates falling but inflation falling faster. In other words, as long as the Fed is “behind the curve” in terms of tackling inflation, that’s good for gold. At the moment, it looks as though markets are starting to bet that we might see option one (falling rates and rising inflation) or option three (falling inflation but collapsing rates). In all, that makes sense to me – trade wars drive up costs. The whole point of globalisation is that it drives down costs by bringing a much greater supply of everything – from labour to resources to finished goods – into the global market. If you reverse that, then you lose the savings too. This is not necessarily all catastrophic, a shortage of cheap labour may encourage innovation and investment, which in turn could help to turn around our current problems with low productivity. But in the short term at least, this doesn’t point to a deflationary bust. Instead it smacks to me of stagflation, 1970s style. You end up with a Fed that’s paralysed because the economy is fragile, even although you have inflationary pressures building.
loganair
06/6/2019
11:27
GM Tightfist, The final payment for Coringa is a shade over $11mm, repayments to Sprott are c.$330k per month with them having fully paid off their loan by June 2020. The ore sorter has been paid for in full. I've been going over some figures and the ore sorter is expected to get them to between 55k and 60k oz of production next year with Coringa getting them up to c. 100k in 2021. The scrubber has already reduced costs by c. $80 / oz, and its full benefit is expected in the q2 accounts, according to Clive. It's fair to assume therefore that the ore sorter is expected to increase production around 20%, with minimal cost impact. So with luck that should get them to around $850 / oz AISC. On the conservative basis of 12,500 oz per quarter next year with a similarly conservative AISC around $900 say, at a POG of $1350 that would be $5.6mm profit per quarter in 2020. Will go a long way toward commissioning Coringa, and I personally think there is considerable room for upside to those numbers. Anyway, cashflow aside, things to look forward to in the future (in order of probable release?) - coringa PEA - coringa mining license - cindarella soil geochemistry results - q2 production numbers - cindarella drill program schedule Rather hoping for all of the above in the next two months.
ppvn
06/6/2019
10:55
Hi Ironstorm,IIRC a final $12m instalment for Coringa is due in November or December 2019. Last time I looked it seemed SRB was generating sufficient cash to meet this obligation, but that was without allowing for ongoing monthly instalments to pay-off the Sprott loan and any other obligations outstanding/imminent.It will be good to see the Coringa PEA and hopefully a complete plan/cash flow projection to see what/if needs further investment - with high confidence to reach 100k Oz in due course.Cheers, tightfist
tightfist
06/6/2019
08:06
L2 looking strong again. Nice buying continues... could see 50p very soon.
gregpeck7
06/6/2019
07:58
Gold moving higher again... I think the re rate is on here. Targeting 100,000 ounces a year. 20m mkt cap is ludicrous.
gregpeck7
06/6/2019
07:55
When is the final Coringa Payton due? Confirmation they are paying that from existing resources cannot be far away either. That should help too which I think has been a worry for some investors. Carries on like yesterday and I will be in profit. 🥳
ironstorm
05/6/2019
22:01
2019 - Increase gold production to 44,000oz by the introduction of a Scrubber which will enable the processing of historic tailings for residual gold. 2020 - The start up of Coringa in 2020 will increase production by an estimated 40,000oz per annum + Ore sorter at Palito which will improve efficiency, further increasing gold production to a total of 100,000oz per year Year ending 2020 forecast earnings per share 11.7p Year ending 2021 forecast earnings per share 15.4p Much of the Group’s expenditure is incurred in Brazilian Reais.
loganair
05/6/2019
21:47
80% of a miners costs are in local currency. Gold up by 60 Reais today. The price of gold in Brazilian reais is very near an all time high, which it reach only a few days ago.
loganair
05/6/2019
21:35
Gold up over $5 again...
gregpeck7
05/6/2019
16:08
Agree, gold price looking perky though, is it going to push to 1400? Because of the lack of liquidity here and the fundamental crazy low valuation. If this does start re rating we can see it's going to be quick. Hold.
gregpeck7
05/6/2019
15:17
I agree but was getting nervous when it went below 30p. All the figures suggested 60 - 80p short term especially as possible lower USA interest rates will give gold a boost.
carolj
05/6/2019
15:12
thanks guys
carolj
05/6/2019
14:32
Tightly held share which is very undervalued. Nice to see it finally moving. Not selling any of mine till it's over 100p.
gregpeck7
05/6/2019
14:32
Anker and Garraway were selling and there appears to have been a dash to sell their shares (which Anker won by selling their shares around 28 and then 26p). Garraway seemed to give up on their selling in the mid-40s because (I assume) they bought city financials stake below that level. It's a very illiquid stock so is prone to these bumps (and for the moment less frequent) jumps. I personally believe them to be worth far more than this current sp; last year the financiers for the first Coringa tranche paid 72p equivalent and the performance of both palito and sao chico has greatly improved since then - as has their exploration with Cindarella being found. I don't know if Garraway are done selling - I suspect they aren't - so if this is just a spike for the moment so be it. At some point they will hopefully get a fuller valuation though.
ppvn
05/6/2019
14:29
Positive sentiment returning to Serabi.
loganair
05/6/2019
14:27
thanks King but there must be more reason
carolj
05/6/2019
14:24
People on twitter seem to have just noticed the Q1 results, their significance re an increasing gold price, and the expansion plans. 50 trades making it jump 25% show just how tightly held and illiquid this is.
king_baller
05/6/2019
14:19
wow !!!! why is this going up so quickly now?
carolj
05/6/2019
13:22
Wow that's some write up! The big story with this particular gold rally is the DXY performance. As you've said, gold is at all time highs in many currencies (including BRL) but not USD. Hopefully the dollar pulls back a bit (Elizabeth Warren had some thoughts about devaluing USD two days ago), and Trump obviously does - so Republican or Democrat in 2020 gold could be the winner. Relatively speaking though this share price is still woeful. Nice to see this little bump before the PEA for Coringa comes out - that should assist too.
ppvn
05/6/2019
12:27
Money Week - The global collapse in trust has driven a secret bull market in gold: hxxps://moneyweek.com/508448/secret-bull-market-in-gold-and-the-global-collapse-in-trust/?utm_campaign=money-morning-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter How much more distrusting have we become? Check out these charts. The main authors of In Gold We Trust – Ronald-Peter Stoeferle and Mark J Valek – are (as you might expect) hardcore goldbugs. Theirs is a world view with which many MoneyWeek readers will have a lot of sympathy. I know do. There is too much debt in the world, especially government debt. Easy money, low rates, monetary manipulation, the balance sheets of central banks and all the rest of it have stored up a host of problems, and when the dam breaks it will be nasty. Gold is thus an essential diversifier in everybody’s portfolio. One word, however, appeared more frequently than I have ever known it to. It’s a word with which bitcoin bugs will be only to familiar – “trust”. Bitcoin, of course, was designed to obviate the need for it – “in proof we trust”, runs the saying. Incrementum observes that in the West, trust is disappearing. People no longer trust their governments. They do not trust their politicians. They do not trust their scientists, or their economists. Experts are biased. The media is biased. Even systems and processes are no longer trusted – whether it’s education, healthcare, even democracy itself. The blue squares in the chart below chart declining levels of political trust in various countries around the world. Interestingly, Finland has seen the biggest falls. It’s easy to explain why such trust should have evaporated, from lies about the Iraq war, to the authorities’ reaction to the financial crisis of 2008. Society, as a result, has become polarised in a way that we simply weren’t used in the nineties and early noughties. It’s interesting that the UK actually saw a marginal rise in trust between 2007 and 2016, albeit from much lower levels. This probably reflects the difference in perception between the Brown and Cameron administrations. When the 2018-2019 data gets released, I think you’ll see UK trust in governments at an all-time low. As far as Incrementum (and any like-minded gold or bitcoin bug) is concerned, this loss of trust in our institutions and in each other is leading up to the humdinger – a loss of trust in money itself. Indeed, that’s why bitcoin was designed in the first place. At a global level, this is manifesting itself in mutual distrust among central banks. Some have repatriated gold held overseas, while others have been increasing their gold holdings in what is known as the de-dollarisation of the economy. Hungary has increased its gold holdings tenfold, for example. That’s extreme – but most nations are at it. It’s no coincidence that the change in trend began in 2008. That’s when they bailed out the banks. What struck me, in particular, was, cumulatively, how much gold Russia has bought. While the growth in China’s holdings, as I have written about before, is extraordinary. So loss of trust was one big theme of this year’s report. And these central bank reserve charts go some way to demonstrating the scale aof that loss of trust. Gold’s secret bull market: I just want to cover a couple more charts which caught my eye. We tend to think of gold in US dollar terms, because that is the official price in which gold is measured. As a result, our perception is that gold peaked in 2011 at $1,920 per ounce and has been in a bear market ever since. Today it sits around $1,330. But over the same period the US dollar has largely been in a bull market. It has been strengthening against most currencies. On the other hand, I’ve often described gold as a hedge against your own government. And in the UK, for example, it has served that purpose well. Gold was £700/oz in early 2016, before the Brexit vote. Today it’s 50% higher, at roughly £1,050. In this next chart we see the world price of gold – ie gold plotted against all major national currencies. You wouldn’t know it, but by this measure, gold has been in a bull market since 2013. Gold has, in other words, been doing what it is supposed to do. There are many great charts in the report, and I recommend you take a look. But I wanted to finish off with one final chart that caught my eye. Commodity prices are incredibly low, believe it or not: A common theme of mine in recent years has been the extraordinary valuation ascribed to the digital economy, while the real economy has lagged. Whether it’s the valuations ascribed to FANG stocks or bitcoin, or the earnings of tech entrepreneurs, the digital economy has eclipsed the physical economy. The reason is scalability, as I outlined last week. Real stuff is a burden. The physical economy is hard. Nowhere is this dichotomy more apparent than in the commodities markets. We think of the great commodities bull market of the 2000s, and then the subsequent bear market we are in today. But oil is still above $50 a barrel, copper costs nearly $6,000 a tonne, and wheat is around $200 a bushel. Prices don’t feel that low. However, if we look at commodity prices relative to stock prices, they are actually more depressed than they were at the turn of the century, before that great secular bull market. In fact they’re almost as low as they were in the late 1960s. Here we see the ratio of the Goldman Sachs Commodities Index against the Dow Jones. I don’t think it starts tomorrow. Probably not even this decade. But the stage is being set for a turnaround in commodities – and as such the real economy. And if all the inflation that has built up over the last decade manifests itself in commodity prices, then you really will need to own some gold. For now, amid the recent stockmarket correction, gold has had a nice little rally over this past couple of weeks to around $1,330. It’s looking strong. But the big barrier remains that $1,360 area that has been resistance for some five years now. Will 2019 be the year it gets through? Let’s hope so.
loganair
04/6/2019
08:00
I think it was just after-hours - but I don't know which day however..... Maybe are just about to find out!
tightfist
03/6/2019
20:26
MMs seem to be accumulating they didn't widen the spread on that sell.
suncanaria
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