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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Sainsbury (j) Plc LSE:SBRY London Ordinary Share GB00B019KW72 ORD 28 4/7P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -2.60p -1.28% 201.20p 8,978,291 16:35:04
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
201.30p 201.50p 205.10p 199.30p 203.10p
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Food & Drug Retailers 29,007.00 239.00 9.10 22.1 4,432.0

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DateSubject
19/5/2019
09:20
Sainsbury (j) Daily Update: Sainsbury (j) Plc is listed in the Food & Drug Retailers sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker SBRY. The last closing price for Sainsbury (j) was 203.80p.
Sainsbury (j) Plc has a 4 week average price of 199.30p and a 12 week average price of 199.30p.
The 1 year high share price is 341.80p while the 1 year low share price is currently 199.30p.
There are currently 2,202,802,075 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 8,397,552 shares. The market capitalisation of Sainsbury (j) Plc is £4,432,037,774.90.
17/5/2019
09:35
loganair: Could the Sainsbury’s share price ruin your Stocks and Shares ISA? by Andy Ross: From the infamous moment that J Sainsbury (LON: SBRY) boss Mike Coupe was caught singing “we’re in the money ” while waiting for a TV interview, his goal of merging the supermarket he runs with Walmart-owned Asda seemed to start slipping from his grasp. And so it has proved with the Competition and Markets Authority blocking the deal on the grounds of reduced customer choice and likely higher prices. With the merger having been called off, what shape is Sainsbury’s now in as a business and investment prospect? Could it drive your Stocks and Shares ISA to new heights or leave it generating even lower returns than a Cash ISA? The results paint a picture: The simple answer to that question is: not good. The full-year results showed that despite acquiring Argos in 2016, the group only just managed to increase its overall sales by a fairly measly 2.1%. But the bigger problem was the falls in profit before tax and earnings per share. The former fell by a massive 29%, the latter by 32%. The results paint a pretty bleak picture to me of a company that is in poor shape and was desperate to acquire growth and market share through a major acquisition or merger. That is not a recipe anyone should embrace. Indeed, rightly or wrongly, it reminds me of the desperate antics of Carillion trying to buy Balfour Beatty not that long before it collapsed. I’m not saying the same thing will happen at Sainsbury’s, but the company does have some parallels – huge debt, reliance on acquisitions for growth and a high and growing dividend despite a poorly performing business. Debt: Addressing debt first of all, it is seven times greater than pre-tax profit which for me is uncomfortably high. Management recognises the issue and has an aim of reducing debt by £600m over the next three years. This is a good first step, but the level for me is still a concern. Acquisition growth? Although there was praise for the Argos acquisition at the time, nearly three years later, the question has to be asked: was it worth it? In the final results, Sainsbury’s, did not separate Argos’s financial contribution to the group and instead focused on synergies and its presence in Sainsbury’s stores. I think investors deserve a little more detail than that, given £1.4bn was spent on acquiring the business. The dividend: Then there is the dividend. It may be tempting to want to grab shares in a company yielding over 5%. However, with profit before tax plummeting, it is hard to see the sustainability in increasing the dividend and unless the underlying business improves, a future cut to the dividend looks likely to me. It happened to Tesco in recent memory and it could happen to Sainsbury’s too. Even with the share price at its lowest in a decade, I would not be tempted to buy into Sainsbury’s. To me it looks like a value trap, and one that I’m keen not to fall into.
01/5/2019
15:57
spob: at the end of the day the long term share price performance says it all how have shareholders in Sainsbury's done over the last 20 years ? then make adjustments for the increased number of shares then make adjustments for inflation if you've held Sainsbury's shares for the last 20 or 30 years, you really don't want to do those sums. There is every reason to believe the next 20 years will be much the same or .....
01/5/2019
14:30
loganair: Sainsbury’s share price is rising. Is it time to buy? The J Sainsbury share price has fallen by 25% over the last year, leaving it well behind listed rivals Tesco and Morrisons. One reason for this is the failed attempt to merge with Asda, which caused the shares to slide. Figures published today reveal that there was probably only one winner from this unsuccessful deal — the supermarket’s army of bankers and advisers, who collected fees of £46m for their work. However, it’s now time for the company and its shareholders to move on. Happily, Sainsbury’s has published a fairly upbeat set of full-year results today, revealing stable trading and a 7.8% rise in underlying profits. Loyal shareholders have also been rewarded with a 7.8% dividend increase. The shares are up by nearly 4% at the time of writing. Is it time to start buying? What’s missing from these numbers? Sainsbury’s underlying pre-tax profit rose by 7.8% to £635m last year. But a total of £396m of adjustments meant that the supermarket’s reported pre-tax profit fell by 42% to £239m. Most companies provide these two versions of profits in their accounts. Adjusted profits can exclude some items, while reported profits must include all costs and gains in order to meet accounting standards. Adjusted profits can be useful. They make it easier to see how a company’s underlying business is performing, excluding one-off changes. But I tend to get worried when I see such a large gap between adjusted and reported profits. Is the company masking a poor performance with heavy adjustments? I’d take a more cautious view: I’m not suggesting anything is wrong with Sainsbury’s accounts, but I would prefer to see a more cautious view of underlying profitability. Some expenses, such as the Asda deal fees and Argos integration are obviously one-offs and are now complete. Others seem to repeat regularly. For example, the “transition221; of Sainsbury’s Bank has been recorded as an exceptional cost of between £38m and £70m in each of the last four years. A similar expense is expected again in 2019/20. In my view, this should be seen as an ongoing cost. I’d use this test instead: The acid test of a business is how much spare cash it generates. So rather than spending too much time analysing Sainsbury’s profits, I’ve taken a look at the firm’s cash generation. My calculations suggest that the business generated free cash flow — surplus cash — of £547m last year, up from £454m in the previous year. This spare cash covered the dividend comfortably and allowed the company to reduce net debt by £222m as well. Overall, I’m impressed by this strong cash performance. Challenges ahead: Boss Mike Coupe still faces some big challenges. Staff and overheads costs rose by 22% to £1,733m last year, while the group’s operating profit margin fell from 1.8% to just 1.1%. That’s much lower than both Tesco (3.4%) and Morrison (2.1%). My view: Sainsbury’s will need to continue investing in its stores and online operations to defend its market share. Net debt is still quite high in my view, and the group’s falling profit margins are a concern. Although the 4.7% dividend yield is tempting, I’d prefer to invest my cash in Tesco or Morrisons. Both these rival firms are more profitable and growing faster.
01/5/2019
11:09
careful: Taking a ten year view, if this dividend is held or thereabouts, this is a sound investment at todays price. We have all become too short term. High volatility with all shares these days. Most shares have halved from their peaks in recent years. We should tuck them away, take the dividends and stop monitoring them every day. I remember in the early days, Warren Buffett said he would not have computers in his office. He thought that checking share price movements daily was a pointless exercise.
26/4/2019
13:13
loganair: Trading within a whisker of a record low, a lot of bad news is already written into the share price. Yesterday's humiliation of Sainsbury and its boss Mike Coupe has not stopped investors from piling into the supermarket giant's shares in the belief the chain can bounce back from the competition regulator's total rejection of a merger with Asda. The buying interest comes after shares had earlier tumbled 6% to their lowest level in almost three years, with the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) killing off the £7.3 billion deal without even mention of possible concessions. The FTSE 100 index stock was the most-bought on the interactive investor platform yesterday, with opportunistic investors confident a chain that still controls more than 15% of the UK grocery market has plenty of levers to pull in terms of improving its performance. They can take some comfort from the revival at Tesco, which has transformed its fortunes under Dave Lewis following an accounting scandal in 2014. The UK's biggest supermarket has just recorded annual profits of £2 billion after 12 quarters in a row of like-for-like sales growth. Sainsbury's shares, just a fraction of a penny from the record low set around the time of the EU referendum in 2016, now trade on little more than 10 times forecast earnings. That's a big discount to rivals Tesco and Morrisons, and there's a yield of over 4.5% too. Its organic growth prospects have been called "uninspiring" by some in the City, but there are areas which should deliver a boost to profits, not least a £500 million cost-cutting programme already underway. Relocating hundreds more Argos stores into Sainsbury's supermarkets as leases expire could, according to UBS, be worth £100 million of operating profit. Whether Coupe will remain at the helm to oversee any Sainsbury's revival is debatable. As if things weren't bad enough following last year's "We're in the Money" gaffe (Coupe was caught humming the tune before a filmed interview to discuss the Asda merger plans had begun), the manner in which regulators dismantled his grand plan is hugely embarrassing for the CEO. Investors will find out if Coupe has a "plan B" when Sainsbury's presents annual results next Wednesday. At the very least, there should be plenty of opportunities for Coupe to drive performance now that the merger distraction is out the way. Judging by consumer feedback, Sainsbury's has room to improve in areas such as product availability and in terms of store appearance. It's been losing ground to rivals in recent months, with merger partner Asda now ahead of it in the supermarket pecking order, and discounters Aldi and Lidl continuing to make inroads. Tesco and Morrisons are in fine form and there's the added threat from online rivals such as Amazon and Ocado. In fact, removing Coupe could prove to be counter-productive if a change at the top creates further uncertainty when Sainsbury's needs to be fully focused on the competition. Coupe announced the merger with Walmart-owned Asda just two years after completing the exhausting acquisition of Argos-owner Home Retail. In an industry where scale is everything, the new company would have generated annual revenue of around £51 billion and savings of "at least" £500 million a year. Despite the CMA's conclusion today that the deal would increase prices, Coupe said the rejection had effectively taken £1 billion out of customers' pockets. Shares jumped as much as 21% when the merger plan was announced last April, with analysts at UBS thinking it could be worth an extra 27.5% of earnings per share by 2022. If Asda maintained its current margin of 3.6%, that figure could have reached 39%.
25/4/2019
13:01
loganair: Anaemic outlook Having spent the past year explaining why the deal with Asda was so necessary, Sainsbury’s chief executive Mike Coupe is now under pressure to persuade a sceptical market that the company can thrive without the merger. It’s a tall order as the business has been struggling, and the group’s operating profit margin is the lowest in the sector. After three consecutive years of dividend cuts, the retailer did at least maintain last year’s payout at the same level as the prior year (despite a further fall in earnings). However, with the 4.7% yield at the current share price (215p) being little better than that available from a FTSE 100 tracker, and the supermarket forecast to produce only anaemic earnings and dividend growth, it seems there’s little potential reward for investors taking on the single-company risk of Sainsbury’s. When it announced its plan to merge with Asda last year, Coupe was caught on camera singing “we’re in the money,” while waiting to be interviewed about the deal for ITV News. As things have turned out, I don’t think he, or investors at today’s share price, will be in the money — at least not to any significantly greater extent than holders of a far less risky FTSE 100 tracker. Existing Sainsbury’s shareholders may be inclined to continue holding to see if Coupe has a Plan B — or, indeed, if he survives at all. on a risk/reward basis, this as a situation in which there’s merit in selling the stock, and buying into one with a more promising outlook.
24/3/2019
15:25
loganair: Should you load up with J Sainsbury’s shares and grab its 4.5% yield? It’s almost 11 months since I wrote about supermarket chain J Sainsbury (LSE: SBRY). Back then, the shares were riding high after the firm had announced its intention to combine its business with Walmart’s Asda. However, we now know the deal is off — at least for the time being — because the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) thinks it’s bad for consumers. And the stock market didn’t like that. The share price has plummeted more than 30% since its August peak. But with the forward-looking dividend yield now nudging 4.5%, should you load up with the stock? A changing sector: I must admit, that kind of dividend income looks tempting to me. And there was a time not so long ago when many investors considered the London-listed supermarket sector as defensive and cash-generating. Indeed, the supermarket chains were seen by many as ideal businesses for backing up dividend-led investments. But all that changed over recent years when the supermarkets revealed their vulnerability. They are, after all, low-margin commodity-style enterprises with little to differentiate the services of one chain from another. My view is that the entire sector is in the process of being disrupted by a new breed of super-discounting outlets, led by the likes of Aldi and Lidl. But there are other competitors too, and we only have to look at how much the old chains such as Sainsbury’s, Morrisons and Tesco have been struggling, and it’s easy to reach the conclusion that the good times may never return. Indeed, I reckon the desperate attempt to tie up Sainsbury’s and Asda is all about the struggle to survive in a changing market. Even for the current trading year to March 2020, City analysts predict earnings for Sainsbury’s will fall well short of the levels achieved back in 2013 and 2014. Forget growth, I reckon. The best we can hope for is some kind of turnaround or recovery in Sainsbury’s business. But I fear the years ahead may deliver a managed decline instead. A second shot at the prize: However, Sainsbury’s and Asda haven’t given up on their attempt to merge. In a statement posted on 19 March, Sainsbury’s said it submitted to the CMA a detailed case to argue for the tie-up, which proposes remedies to the concerns expressed by the authority. One possible investing strategy could be to buy some of Sainsbury’s shares now in the hope that the deal with Asda will eventually go through. If that happens, the shares could shoot up again, as they did before when the proposals were announced. While you’re waiting, you could collect the dividend. However, I’m not keen to do that because if the deal’s rejected a second time, I reckon the share price could go even lower. And I’m not keen to make Sainsbury’s a long-term hold in my portfolio.
28/4/2018
15:04
moorsie2: Any predictions on the impact to SBRY share price? To the sector's shareprices?
09/11/2017
10:57
jdung: if you want waiting for 2-3 years times, now the SBRY share price is 228 p, I think should be " buy "----- at today!
02/2/2016
08:05
edmundshaw: Deal is worth over 160p even if you assume Sainsburys share price was fair at 240p. What? So Coupe accepts 240p as the new normal for SBRY share price? While accepting that 100p was a vastly depressed share price for HOME? Seems that "We will not overpay" is director code for "we are prepared to overpay substantially and screw out own shareholders". Must remember that for future reference :-(
Sainsbury (j) share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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