Royal Dutch Shell Dividends - RDSB

Royal Dutch Shell Dividends - RDSB

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Stock Name Stock Symbol Market Stock Type Stock ISIN Stock Description
Royal Dutch Shell Plc RDSB London Ordinary Share GB00B03MM408 'B' ORD EUR0.07
  Price Change Price Change % Stock Price High Price Low Price Open Price Close Price Last Trade
  -5.50 -0.24% 2,267.50 2,276.50 2,257.00 2,272.50 2,273.00 13:30:04
more quote information »
Industry Sector
OIL & GAS PRODUCERS

Royal Dutch Shell RDSB Dividends History

Announcement Date Type Currency Dividend Amount Period Start Period End Ex Date Record Date Payment Date Total Dividend Amount
31/10/20191USX4731/12/201831/12/201914/11/201915/11/201918/12/20190
01/08/20191USX4731/12/201831/12/201915/08/201916/08/201923/09/20190
02/05/20191USX4731/12/201831/12/201916/05/201917/05/201924/06/20190
04/02/2019FinalUSX4731/12/201731/12/201814/02/201915/02/201925/03/2019188
01/11/20181USX4731/12/201731/12/201815/11/201816/11/201819/12/20180
26/07/20181USX4731/12/201731/12/201809/08/201810/08/201817/09/20180
26/04/20181USX4731/12/201731/12/201810/05/201811/05/201818/06/20180
01/02/2018FinalUSX4731/12/201631/12/201715/02/201816/02/201826/03/2018188
02/11/20171USX4731/12/201631/12/201716/11/201717/11/201720/12/20170
27/07/20171USX4731/12/201631/12/201710/08/201711/08/201718/09/20170
04/05/20171USX4731/12/201631/12/201718/05/201719/05/201726/06/20170
02/02/2017FinalUSX4731/12/201531/12/201616/02/201717/02/201727/03/2017188
01/11/20161USX4731/12/201531/12/201601/11/201611/11/201616/12/20160
28/07/20161USX4731/12/201531/12/201611/08/201612/08/201619/09/20160
04/05/20161USX4731/12/201531/12/201619/05/201620/05/201627/06/20160
04/02/2016FinalUSX4731/12/201431/12/201518/02/201619/02/201629/03/2016188
29/10/20151USX4731/12/201431/12/201512/11/201513/11/201518/12/20150
30/07/20151USX4731/12/201431/12/201513/08/201514/08/201521/09/20150
30/04/20151USX4731/12/201431/12/201514/05/201515/05/201522/06/20150
29/01/2015FinalUSX4731/12/201331/12/201412/02/201513/02/201520/03/2015188
30/10/20141USX4731/12/201331/12/201413/11/201414/11/201422/12/20140
31/07/20141USX4731/12/201331/12/201413/08/201415/08/201425/09/20140
30/04/20141USX4731/12/201331/12/201414/05/201416/05/201426/06/20140
30/01/2014FinalUSX4531/12/201231/12/201312/02/201414/02/201427/03/2014180
31/10/20131USX4531/12/201231/12/201313/11/201315/11/201323/12/20130
01/08/20131USX4531/12/201231/12/201314/08/201316/08/201326/09/20130
02/05/20131USX4531/12/201231/12/201315/05/201317/05/201327/06/20130
31/01/2013FinalUSX4331/12/201131/12/201213/02/201315/02/201328/03/2013172
01/11/20121USX4331/12/201131/12/201214/11/201216/11/201220/12/20120
26/07/20121USX4331/12/201131/12/201208/08/201210/08/201220/09/20120
26/04/20121USX4331/12/201131/12/201209/05/201211/05/201221/06/20120
02/02/2012FinalUSX4231/12/201031/12/201115/02/201217/02/201222/03/2012168
27/10/20111USX4231/12/201031/12/201102/11/201104/11/201116/12/20110
28/07/20111USX4231/12/201031/12/201103/08/201105/08/201119/09/20110
28/04/20111USX4231/12/201031/12/201111/05/201113/05/201127/06/20110
03/02/2011FinalUSX4231/12/200931/12/201009/02/201111/02/201125/03/2011168
28/10/20101USX4231/12/200931/12/201003/11/201005/11/201017/12/20100
29/07/20101USX4231/12/200931/12/201004/08/201006/08/201008/09/20100
28/04/20101USX4231/12/200931/12/201005/05/201007/05/201009/06/20100
04/02/2010FinalUSX4231/12/200831/12/200904/02/201006/02/201011/03/2010168
29/10/20091USX4231/12/200831/12/200904/11/200906/11/200909/12/20090
30/07/20091USX4231/12/200831/12/200905/08/200907/08/200909/09/20090
29/04/20091USX4231/12/200831/12/200906/05/200908/05/200910/06/20090
29/01/2009FinalUSX4031/12/200731/12/200804/02/200906/02/200911/03/2009160
30/10/20081USX4031/12/200731/12/200805/11/200807/11/200810/12/20080
31/07/20081USX4031/12/200731/12/200806/08/200808/08/200810/09/20080
28/04/20081USX4031/12/200731/12/200814/05/200816/05/200811/06/20080
31/01/2008FinalUSX3631/12/200631/12/200706/02/200808/02/200812/03/2008144
25/10/20071USX3631/12/200631/12/200731/10/200702/11/200712/12/20070
26/07/20071USX3631/12/200631/12/200701/08/200703/08/200712/09/20070
03/05/20071USX3631/12/200631/12/200709/05/200711/05/200713/06/20070
01/02/2007FinalUSX32.531/12/200531/12/200607/02/200709/02/200714/03/2007128.5
26/10/20061USX3231/12/200531/12/200601/11/200603/11/200613/12/20060
27/07/20061USX3231/12/200531/12/200602/08/200604/08/200613/09/20060
04/05/20061USX3231/12/200531/12/200610/05/200612/05/200614/06/20060
02/02/2006FinalUSX27.831/12/200431/12/200508/02/200610/02/200615/03/2006111.07
27/10/20051USX27.7831/12/200431/12/200502/11/200504/11/200515/12/20050
28/07/20051USX27.6931/12/200431/12/200503/08/200505/08/200515/09/20050
28/04/20051USX27.831/12/200431/12/200511/05/200513/05/200515/06/20050
03/02/2005FinalUSX10.731/12/200331/12/200409/02/200511/02/200515/03/200516.95
29/07/2004InterimUSX6.2530/12/200330/06/200411/08/200413/08/200415/09/20040
05/02/2004FinalUSX9.6531/12/200231/12/200331/03/200402/04/200406/05/200415.75
24/07/2003InterimUSX6.130/12/200230/06/200313/08/200315/08/200317/09/20030
06/02/2003FinalUSX9.331/12/200131/12/200202/04/200304/04/200306/05/200315.25
01/08/2002InterimUSX5.9530/12/200130/06/200214/08/200216/08/200218/09/20020
07/02/2002FinalUSX8.9531/12/200031/12/200117/04/200219/04/200222/05/200214.8
02/08/2001InterimUSX5.8530/12/200030/06/200115/08/200117/08/200119/09/20010
08/02/2001FinalUSX8.931/12/199931/12/200018/04/200120/04/200123/05/200114.6
03/08/2000InterimUSX5.730/12/199930/06/200014/08/200018/08/200020/09/20000
10/02/2000FinalUSX8.531/12/199831/12/199910/04/200014/04/200016/05/200014
05/08/1999InterimUSX5.530/12/199830/06/199927/09/199901/10/199901/11/19990
11/02/1999FinalUSX8.231/12/199731/12/199819/04/199923/04/199914/05/199913.5
10/09/1998InterimUSX5.330/12/199730/06/199828/09/199802/10/199802/11/19980
12/02/1998FinalUSX831/12/199631/12/199720/04/199824/04/199815/05/199813.1

Top Dividend Posts

DateSubject
16/12/2019
10:50
fjgooner: From the Motley Fool article: "Royston Wild has no position in any of the shares mentioned." Yup. Apart from the fact that he exhibits a singular determination to post relentless negative articles on Shell for many years. And each time getting it wrong. Why would someone with no interest post so many negative articles on the Motely Fool? Here are some of his classic collection, that show his expertise on Shell. ------------- Why Now May Be The Time To Sell Anglo American plc, Tesco PLC & Royal Dutch Shell Plc By Royston Wild - Thursday, 14 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £18.13 Why I Wouldn't Touch Royal Dutch Shell Plc & Tullow Oil plc With A Bargepole! By Royston Wild - Friday, 8 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £17.40 Can 1st Quarter Winners Royal Dutch Shell Plc (+10%), Unilever plc (+8%) & KAZ Minerals PLC (+67%) Keep Climbing? By Royston Wild - Friday, 1 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.83 Is It Finally Time To Give Up On Royal Dutch Shell Plc? By Royston Wild - Thursday, 24 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.88 Is Royal Dutch Shell Plc In Danger Of A Colossal Correction? By Royston Wild - Thursday, 17 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £17.38 Why Royal Dutch Shell Plcs Dividend Outlook Should Scare You By Royston Wild - Thursday, 10 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.41 Are Lloyds Banking Group PLC & Royal Dutch Shell Plc REALLY Great Value? By Royston Wild - Monday, 29 February, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.45 When Will Shares In Royal Dutch Shell Plc Finally Reach Bottom? By Royston Wild - Wednesday, 17 February, 2016 His comment: I believe much further trouble is in store for Shell looking ahead and expect shares to keep on falling. RDSB Shareprice was at £16.36 Royal Dutch Shell Plc & Vodafone Group plc: Value Titans Or Value Traps? By Royston Wild - Tuesday, 9 February, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £14.61 Why Royal Dutch Shell Plc Shares Could Easily Topple Another 15%! By Royston Wild - Friday, 29 January, 2016 His comment: A subsequent re-rating of Shells share price would leave the oil leviathan dealing at £12.80 per share, representing a vast 15% reduction from current levels. But even this projection be considered optimistic, in my opinion. RDSB Shareprice was at £15.21 Why Buying BP plc & Royal Dutch Shell Plc Is Utter Madness! By Royston Wild - Friday, 15 January, 2016 His comment: I believe investors should resist attempting to pick up a bargain. RDSB Shareprice was at £13.51 Royal Dutch Shell Plc & GlaxoSmithKline plc: Brilliant Bargains Or Value Traps? By Royston Wild - Friday, 8 January, 2016 His comment: I believe Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) can be considered a bona-fide value trap at the present time. RDSB Shareprice was at £13.75
15/12/2019
10:59
the grumpy old men: FTSE 100 dividend stock Shell’s slumped in 2019! Time to buy for your 2020 ISA? Royston Wild | Sunday, 15th December, 2019 | More on: RDSB New year 2020 celebration. Gold foil balloons Image source: Getty Images I recently explained why Coca-Cola HBC could be a FTSE 100 stock that’ll turn from a squib in 2019 to a full-fledged firework in 2020. While the soft drinks giant has seen its share price stagnate this year, Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) has performed even worse as growing fears over the global economy has prompted waves of investor selling. Its share price has fallen 9% so far in 2019 but, unlike the Coke maker, it’s not a company I’m tempted to buy for even a second. The supply surge Brent oil prices have grown steadily since plunging back under the critical $60 per barrel in late September. In fact the energy benchmark is about 10 bucks more expensive than it was at the start of the year. But market makers are fearing what 2020 holds for profits over at Shell and its peers as millions of barrels of unwanted material lurk on the horizon. According to the International Energy Agency, supply from non-OPEC nations is about to surge. It estimates that these countries will pull 2.3m barrels of the black stuff out of the ground each day next year, up from the 1.8m barrels estimated for 2019, because of rising production from the US, Brazil, Norway, and Guyana. Shale production in the US in particular has surged in recent times, and is predicted to climb to 12.3bn barrels this year from the record 11bn barrels in 2018. The OPEC+ group (that’s the OPEC cluster of nations plus a handful of other major producers like Russia, Mexico, and Kazakhstan) vowed to cut production again from 1 January at their latest meeting this month. Output will be reduced by an extra 500,000 barrels per day in the three months to March, with total cuts now estimated at 1.7m barrels. Market mayhem Such action, though, threatens to be overshadowed by likely falls in energy consumption over the next year, as tough economic conditions in OECD nations and major emerging markets – environments that threaten to be worsened should US-led trade wars continue – cast a pall over the global oil demand outlook. The IEA believes, for example, that the oil market will remain in surplus to the tune of 700,000 barrels a day in the first quarter. And as the boffins over at banking giant ING note: “[these] numbers do call into question how much more upside we could see in prices going into 2020, particularly given the fact that it will not take long for the market to focus on the larger surplus that is estimated over the second quarter in the absence of OPEC+ action”. It doesn’t matter to me that Shell trades on a rock-bottom forward price-to-earnings ratio of 10 times and boasts a giant 7% corresponding dividend yield, too. The risk of more serious share price weakness in 2020 makes it a risk too far, and I for one won’t be buying in any time soon. A top income share with a juicy 6% forecast dividend yield Income-seeking investors like you won’t want to miss out on this timely opportunity… Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK analyst all fired up about this out-of-favour business that’s throwing off gobs of cash! But here’s the really exciting part… Our analyst is predicting there’s potential for this company’s market value to soar by at least 50% over the next few years... He even anticipates that the dividend could grow nicely too — as this much-loved household brand continues to rapidly expand its online business — and reinvent itself for the digital age. With shares still changing hands at what he believes is an undemanding valuation, now could be the ideal time for patient, income-seeking investors to start building a long-term holding. Click here to claim your copy of this special report now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Income Share… free of charge! Royston Wild has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
06/12/2019
10:52
adrian j boris: Why I think you’d be smart to buy the Shell share price in 2020 Rupert Hargreaves | Friday, 6th December, 2019 | More on: RDSB Silhouette of an oil rig Image source: Getty Images. The Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) share price has underperformed the FTSE 100 over the past 12-months by around 13%, including dividends. The way I see it, there are a handful of reasons why the stock has underperformed the market in 2019. The oil price For a start, the oil price, which rallied to a high of more than $65 a barrel at the end of April, has struggled to push above this level. The price of black gold has remained depressed since hitting this high and has traded in a range of between $50/bbl and $60/bbl for much of 2019. This oil price volatility has hit Shell’s earnings. Its second-quarter net income fell 25%, and then the company posted a 15% decline in current costs of supply earnings for the third quarter. The decline in earnings was a sharp turnaround from the fourth quarter of 2018 when the group reported a 36% jump in profits, taking the full-year result to the highest level in four years. As well as falling profit, I think investors have also been deserting the company after management warned that the group might have to delay its cash return policy. Cash returns Following Shell’s takeover of BG Group, the company had been promising to return $25bn to investors with buybacks to offset the dilution of the merger over the next few years. The group started this programme in July 2018 but announced that it might scale back this initiative in November. “The prevailing weak macroeconomic conditions and challenging outlook inevitably create uncertainty about the pace of reducing gearing to 25% and completing the share buyback program within the 2020 timeframe,” CEO Ben van Beurden told investors and analysts at the beginning of November. He later sought to downplay the warning, but the damage had already been done. The third and final reason why I think investors have been selling the Shell share price are the concerns about the firm’s role in climate change. On this front, the company is trying to change. It is investing billions over the next few years to bolster its renewables business and recently failed to acquire Dutch renewable energy firm Eneco for €4.1bn. In my opinion, this failed deal showcases Shell’s renewable energy ambitions. Time to buy Considering all of the above, I think it would be smart to buy the Shell share price in 2020. After recent declines, shares in the company have fallen to a forward P/E of 10.5 and support a dividend yield of 6.6%, a level of income that looks extremely attractive in the current interest rate environment. On top of this, Shell has already shown us that it can cope with a low oil price. Meanwhile, a delay to the buyback isn’t too much of a concern for long-term holders. On the climate change front, Shell is changing, and the company is spending more than most of its peers to reduce its carbon footprint. So, that’s why I think you’d be smart to take advantage of the Shell share price’s recent decline and buy the stock in 2020. A top income share with a juicy 6% forecast dividend yield Motley Fool UK
09/11/2019
20:14
adrian j boris: Why I would buy the Shell share price for my Stocks and Shares ISA right now Rupert Hargreaves | Friday, 8th November, 2019 | More on: RDSB Light bulb with jester hat perched on top Image source: Getty Images The Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) share price took a hit at the end of October after the company warned global economic weakness and persistent lower energy prices could hit shareholder returns. Accordingly, the stock has underperformed the FTSE 100 by around 3% over the past month. However, I think this could be an excellent opportunity to snap up shares in this global oil giant and dividend champion at an attractive valuation. Indeed, while the stock’s recent performance is disappointing, I think investors should look past its short-term headwinds and concentrate on its long-term potential. Struggling for growth As one of the world’s largest oil groups, Shell currently has to deal with several headwinds. Climate change concerns are driving the world (albeit slowly) away from fossil fuels towards renewable energy, and the company is having to prepare for this environment. At the same time, the shale oil boom in the US continues to weigh on oil prices, and this is reducing the group’s overall probability. The combination of higher costs as spending on renewable energy projects grows, coupled with lower income from its legacy operations, means Shell has to seriously reconsider its plans to return cash to investors. According to the company’s chief financial officer, Jessica Uhl, if energy prices remain at the level they were throughout the third quarter of 2019 for the next 12-months, Shell’s cash flow could drop by as much as $9bn, putting the group’s $25bn share repurchase programme in jeopardy. That’s disappointing. But it’s unlikely the cash flow pinch will extend to Shell’s dividend, and that’s good news for income investors. At the time of writing, the stock supports a dividend yield of 6.1%. Look to the long term Over the past few decades, Shell has built a reputation as being a dependable dividend stock. Despite the headlines currently buffeting the business, I don’t think this is going to come to an end anytime soon. Management has done a tremendous amount of work over the past few years reorganising the company for lower oil prices, and now its concentrating on positioning the business for a low-carbon world. This transition won’t be painless. I think Shell is going to take a hit to profits in the mid-term as it devotes more capital to future growth but, in my opinion, this is the right course of action. If the company doesn’t invest now for future growth, it could find itself having to play catch up at a later date, which would undoubtedly mean much more pain for shareholders. So that’s why I would buy the Shell share price for my Stocks and Shares ISA right now. I think the company’s long-term potential is exciting and, in the meantime, investors can pick up that 6.1% dividend yield. Motley Fool UK analysts
13/9/2019
10:32
the grumpy old men: motely fool The Shell share price vs the FTSE 100: which is the better buy? Rupert Hargreaves | Friday, 13th September, 2019 | More on: ^FTSE RDSB Road signs rerouting traffic Image source: Getty Images. Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) is one of my favourite dividend stocks in the FTSE 100. And I’m not the only one who likes this business. The stock is a staple of income funds across the country, as well as around the world. Last year, FTSE 100 blue-chips paid out a combined £91bn to shareholders. Shell accounted for around £12.3bn of that, making it one of the biggest dividend payers in the entire London market. At the time of writing the stock supports a dividend yield of 6.5%. However, while Shell does have attractive dividend credentials, there’s no getting away from the fact that this company is just one business in an industry mired in controversy. Therefore, if you are looking for a steady income stream, it might be better to buy the FTSE 100 instead. Diversification Shell is one of the biggest dividend payers in the FTSE 100, but it isn’t the only company that offers a dividend. Only a handful of blue-chips don’t provide a steady income for investors. In total, the FTSE 100 has an average dividend yield of 4.5%. This level of income might not match that offered by Shell, but it is from a more diversified base of companies. In my opinion, it’s worth accepting this lower level of income for the additional security provided through diversification. On top of the fact that the FTSE 100’s income stream is more diversified, it also seems to offer more in the way of capital growth. Right now, shares in Shell are changing hands for around 2,283p per B share. In September 2014, the shares were dealing for around 2,500p. So, the stock has actually produced a negative capital return for shareholders over the past five years. The volatile price of oil has held back the group’s growth, and this will continue to be a problem for investors. As one of the world’s largest oil companies, Shell is always going to be beholden to the oil price. On the other hand, there are only two big oil companies in the FTSE 100. The rest of the constituents are spread across sectors and industries. Their earnings are not dependent on the price of just one commodity. It should come as no surprise then that the FTSE 100 has produced a better return than the Shell share price over the past five years. An investor who bought the index in 2014 has seen an annualised total return of 5.7% compared to just 3.7% for an investment in Shell. Compounding returns The 2% gap between the performance of Shell and the FTSE 100 might not seem like much, but over the long term, these few percentage points will add up. For example, an interest rate of 3.7% will turn £1,000 into £2,081 over 20 years. The same £1,000 invested at a rate of 5.7% will grow into £3,077. So overall, while Shell has some of the best dividend credentials in the FTSE 100, I think the index itself has better prospects for income and capital growth over the long term.
03/6/2019
15:05
fjgooner: Apologies for the formatting and the missing graphics, but this is the best that I can do right now. ---------------------------- UNDER THE BONNET We explain what this company does How does Shell make its money and should you buy its shares? We reveal where the FTSE 100 giant gets the cash to fund its mighty dividends With a market cap of more than £200bn Anglo-Dutch oil major Royal Dutch Shell (RDSB) is comfortably the largest company on the UK stock market. To put its position into perspective, it accounts for around 10% of the FTSE 100 index on its own. Given its heavyweight status in London and the generous stream of dividends it pays, there is a good chances many of us will have at least some exposure to the stock either directly or through an investment fund. Bottom line: if you are a UK investor, Shell really matters. But how much do you know about where and how Shell makes its money? For all that it has pledged to reduce its carbon footprint, Shell still derives nearly all of its revenue from fossil fuel related activity. A structural shift to renewable energy in many parts of the world therefore raises questions over the long term sustainability of its dividend. At the current share price of £25.52 Shell is yielding 5.7%. UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENT PARTS Shell is an integrated energy business. This means it has operations in oil and gas exploration, production, marketing, refining, transportation and distribution. In a nutshell it is involved in everything from drilling and finding new sources of oil and gas to selling you petrol at the pump. This gives it almost unrivalled insight into the energy market, the downside being that its many moving parts make it difficult to value. For example, while higher oil prices are generally good news for Shell, they also have a negative impact on margins in its refining operations. The situation is further complicated by the fact the different parts of Shell sell products and services to each other. In this article we will examine the separate components of the business in more detail and what they contribute in terms of earnings. We will also discuss Shell’s strategy and how this underpins its long-term track record of generous dividends. INTEGRATED GAS AND NEW ENERGIES DIVISIONS INTEGRATED GAS = 44.2% OF 2018 EARNINGS INTEGRATED GAS – RECENT EARNINGS TREND 2016 $2.5bn 2017 $5.1bn 2018 $11.4bn Shell’s main response to the changing patterns in energy consumption and growing political pressure over climate change has been to target natural gas. In a June 2015 speech Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden said of natural gas: ‘It is flexible. Its supply is abundant and diverse. Its range of uses is still expanding. It is a low-carbon, clean-burning ally to renewables such as solar and wind. And it makes economic sense.’ Expanding in this area was a key rationale behind its £36bn merger with BG in 2016. It now has a leading footprint in liquefied natural gas, which involves cooling gas to a liquid state so it can be shipped and stored. It also includes the conversion of natural gas to GTL (gas-to-liquid) fuels. This part of the business also encompasses the New Energies division. This is in effect the ‘green’ part of Shell and it has plans to invest between $1bn and $2bn a year out to 2020 in areas like wind and solar power, electric vehicle infrastructure and biofuels. This might sound like a significant outlay, but it should be seen in the context of overall capital expenditure of between $25bn and $30bn a year. UPSTREAM DIVISION Upstream includes exploration and production of conventional oil and gas, deep water exploration and an increasing contribution from shale – the rock containing previously untapped sources of oil and gas which, in the past decade, has been exploited through improvements in technology. The Upstream division also encompasses the marketing and transportation of crude oil and natural gas as well as the operation of infrastructure such as pipelines which help deliver these resources to market. This part of the business is most exposed to commodity price volatility, reflected in the recent earnings trend which, as the chart shows, saw this part of the business chalk up a loss in 2018. [Note from FJ - this was an error by Shares Magazine - it should say "loss in 2016".] UPSTREAM = 26.4% OF 2018 EARNINGS UPSTREAM – RECENT EARNINGS TREND 2018 $6.8bn 2017 $1.5bn 2016 $-3.7bn DOWNSTREAM DIVISION The Downstream division encompasses the refining of the crude oil which comes out of the ground to generate oil products such as petrol, jet fuel and heating oil. Globally the company has 21 refineries with the capacity to process a total of 2.8m barrels of crude oil per day. DOWNSTREAM = 29.4% OF 2018 EARNINGS DOWNSTREAM – RECENT EARNINGS TREND 2018 $7.6bn 2017 $8.3bn 2016 $6.6bn It also markets refined products like petrol and lubricants with 44,000 Shell branded petrol stations in more than 75 countries. In addition, the division manufactures chemicals for a range of industrial customers. These products are used in the manufacture of everything from cars and detergents to bike helmets. It includes the oil sands business, from which Shell has increasingly retreated of late. HOW SHELL SEES THE DIFFERENT PARTS OF ITS BUSINESS Shell puts its businesses in three different categories. • Cash engines – which as their name suggests are expected to provide reliable cash flow to fund dividends and to strengthen the balance sheet. • Growth priorities – areas in which the company is investing to create the cash engines of the future. • Emerging opportunities – areas which could become growth priorities once they have been further developed and could prove to be a substantial source of future cash flow. CASH ENGINES Conventional oil and gas Integrated gas Oil products Biotechnology GROWTH PRIORITIES Deep water Chemicals EMERGING OPPORTUNITIES Shales New energies THE INVESTMENT CASE Despite its big step out into the natural gas market, Shell has not really been a rapid growth story in recent years. An uptick in revenue and earnings has been driven by recovering commodity markets and Shell has been selling off assets to help reduce borrowings built up amid the oil price crash and through the takeover of BG. As investment bank Berenberg observes: ‘Shell has an attractive slate of assets starting up over the coming years, including profitable developments in Brazil and further LNG projects. Production is not growing however, due to the substantial divestment programme under way to de-lever the balance sheet.’ Shell nonetheless is very much an income play for investors. It has not cut its dividend since the Second World War and its leaner structure and more efficient operations help underpin its dividend credentials. Unlike its rival BP (BP.), Shell has not increased its dividend despite the recent surge in oil prices. It has been buying back its own shares to help compensate shareholders for the scrip dividend, introduced in early 2015, which allowed investors to receive their dividends in shares or cash. Although this reduced pressure on Shell’s balance sheet, by increasing the number of shares in issue it was also dilutive to shareholders. An investor day in June might spell out plans for further capital returns to investors. A near 6%-yield is highly attractive to investors and we rate this as an excellent stock to own, particularly if you rely on income from your investments. However, you do need to keep a close eye on regulatory and political developments as climate change becomes more of an issue. Equally the world will not wean itself off fossil fuels overnight and there is reason to believe the company can extend its proud 70-plus year dividend track record into the medium term at least. We give Shell a solid ‘buy’ rating. By Tom Sieber Deputy Editor
29/11/2018
00:15
fjgooner: Hoggy, You're quite right of course. That Motley Fool poster Royston Wild has been posting negatively on Shell for years, hoping that one day - just ONE day - that he may not look like the complete tool that he is on this topic. I keep tabs on this pest - here's a reminder. ----------- Re: Royston Wild has no position in any shares mentioned. That may possibly be true - except for a clearly apparent, jealous, negative obsession - and he certainly seems to have a determination to post relentless negative articles on Shell for ages. Why would someone with no interest post so many negative articles on the Motely Fool over several years? Have a look at: Http://www.fool.co.uk/company/page/1/?ticker=LSE-RDSB Below are a few typical Royston Wild headlines from 2016, but there are many more to choose from the link posted above throughout 2017 and I can't be bothered with 2018 - commitment of the highest possible order. Is there a clue in the title Motely Fool?. I've included below the Closing Price of Shell to give you an idea of how helpful his advice has been if the casual investor had taken it. RDSB Shareprice today: £23.83 76% higher than when he posted his classic "I believe investors should resist attempting to pick up a bargain" when the RDSB share price was at £13.51. That is why I personally choose to never take his opinion on Shell as anything other than comical. And irritating for the absolute lack of acknowledging how he's got it wrong on every prior "article". But this one from March this year sums this poster up the best: Https://www.fool.co.uk/investing/2017/03/21/why-id-never-buy-royal-dutch-shell-plc/ Why I’d never buy Royal Dutch Shell plc Never? Lol. Don't get your clown shoes trapped in the rotating doors on your way out. Best regards, FJ ------------------------- Why Now May Be The Time To Sell Anglo American plc, Tesco PLC & Royal Dutch Shell Plc By Royston Wild - Thursday, 14 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £18.13 Why I Wouldn't Touch Royal Dutch Shell Plc & Tullow Oil plc With A Bargepole! By Royston Wild - Friday, 8 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £17.40 Can 1st Quarter Winners Royal Dutch Shell Plc (+10%), Unilever plc (+8%) & KAZ Minerals PLC (+67%) Keep Climbing? By Royston Wild - Friday, 1 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.83 Is It Finally Time To Give Up On Royal Dutch Shell Plc? By Royston Wild - Thursday, 24 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.88 Is Royal Dutch Shell Plc In Danger Of A Colossal Correction? By Royston Wild - Thursday, 17 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £17.38 Why Royal Dutch Shell Plc¢â‚¬â„¢s Dividend Outlook Should Scare You By Royston Wild - Thursday, 10 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.41 Are Lloyds Banking Group PLC & Royal Dutch Shell Plc REALLY Great Value? By Royston Wild - Monday, 29 February, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.45 When Will Shares In Royal Dutch Shell Plc Finally Reach Bottom? By Royston Wild - Wednesday, 17 February, 2016 His comment: I believe much further trouble is in store for Shell looking ahead and expect shares to keep on falling. RDSB Shareprice was at £16.36 Royal Dutch Shell Plc & Vodafone Group plc: Value Titans Or Value Traps? By Royston Wild - Tuesday, 9 February, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £14.61 Why Royal Dutch Shell Plc Shares Could Easily Topple Another 15%! By Royston Wild - Friday, 29 January, 2016 His comment: A subsequent re-rating of Shell¢â‚¬â„¢s share price would leave the oil leviathan dealing at £12.80 per share, representing a vast 15% reduction from current levels. But even this projection be considered optimistic, in my opinion. RDSB Shareprice was at £15.21 Why Buying BP plc & Royal Dutch Shell Plc Is Utter Madness! By Royston Wild - Friday, 15 January, 2016 His comment: I believe investors should resist attempting to pick up a bargain. RDSB Shareprice was at £13.51 Royal Dutch Shell Plc & GlaxoSmithKline plc: Brilliant Bargains Or Value Traps? By Royston Wild - Friday, 8 January, 2016 His comment: I believe Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) can be considered a bona-fide value trap at the present time. RDSB Shareprice was at £13.75
16/10/2018
08:39
la forge: What could the future hold for Aviva plc, Glencore PLC, Vodafone Group plc and Royal Dutch Shell Plc? Do these shares offer bright investment outlooks? Aviva plc (LON:AV) (AV.L), Glencore PLC (LON:GLEN) (GLEN.L), Vodafone Group plc (LON:VOD) (VOD.L) and Royal Dutch Shell Plc (LON:RDSB) (RDSB.L) October 16, 2018 Robert Stephens FTSE 100 Royal Dutch Shell Plc Royal Dutch Shell Plc The investment prospects of Aviva plc (LON:AV) (AV.L), Glencore PLC (LON:GLEN) (GLEN.L), Vodafone Group plc (LON:VOD) (VOD.L) and Royal Dutch Shell Plc (LON:RDSB) (RDSB.L) appear to be relatively bright in my view. Aviva is currently searching for a new CEO, which could create a degree of instability in the short run. However, with what seems to be a sound business model following its restructuring of recent years, I feel it could generate improving financial performance. With acquisitions set to be ahead alongside further investment in fast-growing markets, I believe that the Aviva share price could offer good value for money on a dividend yield of around 6%. Glencore’s recent share price falls could continue in the short run. Investor sentiment appears to be weak, and this trend could continue as fears surrounding regulatory risks continue. However, with a single-digit P/E ratio and what seems to be an improving business model, I’m upbeat about the outlook for the Glencore share price. With the world economy continuing to grow relatively quickly, I think it could benefit from a buoyant commodity marketplace. Vodafone’s share price fall has been disappointing in recent months. The company’s stock price has come under pressure as investors have become concerned about the level of investment required by the business. While this could hold back its performance in the near term, over the long run I believe that the FTSE 100 stock could offer upside potential. Vodafone has a 7%+ dividend yield and with acquisitions having been made recently, its EPS growth rate could improve over the next few years. Shell’s dividend yield continues to be relatively attractive in my view – even after its share price has performed relatively well in recent months. With a 5.5%+ dividend yield, the stock continues to have a yield that is around 150 basis points higher than the FTSE 100. Since I’m optimistic about the prospects for the oil price, I feel that Shell could offer upside potential, although volatility may be relatively high. About Robert Stephens 4577 Articles Robert Stephens is a CFA Charterholder and an Equity Analyst by trade. He is a passionate private investor who has been buying and selling shares for many years, owning a wide range of UK shares in the process. He has written for Citywire and The Motley Fool US and now runs his own business. To contact Robert, please email info@investomania.co.uk or use one of the other contact methods available on the 'Contact Us' page
10/10/2018
08:29
la forge: 4 top dividend shares? Vodafone Group plc, AstraZeneca plc, National Grid plc and Royal Dutch Shell Plc Do these income shares offer impressive outlooks? Vodafone Group plc (LON:VOD) (VOD.L), AstraZeneca plc (LON:AZN) (AZN.L), National Grid plc (LON:NG) (NG.L) and Royal Dutch Shell Plc (LON:RDSB) (RDSB.L) October 10, 2018 Robert Stephens FTSE 100 Vodafone Group plc Vodafone Group plc The income investing prospects of Vodafone Group plc (LON:VOD) (VOD.L), AstraZeneca plc (LON:AZN) (AZN.L), National Grid plc (LON:NG) (NG.L) and Royal Dutch Shell Plc (LON:RDSB) (RDSB.L) seem to be relatively positive in my view. Vodafone’s share price fall means that it has a dividend yield of over 7%. Although the company is seeing its investment-related costs increase as it bids on 5G spectrum, I think that its long-term growth prospects continue to be bright. The acquisitions it has made may strengthen its overall position, while partnerships could lead to improved competitiveness in key markets. With EPS growth expected to improve next year, I think the Vodafone share price may have investment appeal. AstraZeneca’s investment in its pipeline could lead to stronger EPS performance over the next few years. The company has been able to put in place what seems to be a stronger foundation for future growth, and this could prompt a higher valuation further down the line. With a dividend yield of around 3.7%, I think AstraZeneca remains a relatively appealing income stock. While dividend growth has been non-existent in recent years, its improving financial performance could lead to a rise in shareholder payments in future. National Grid’s dividend yield of around 6% is relatively high when compared to its recent history. This suggests to me that the stock could offer good value for money, while it may also provide a degree of defensive characteristics in case the FTSE 100 continues its recent fall. While political and regulatory risks remain high, I think that National Grid’s overall strategy is sound. Its focus on investing in its North American assets could lead to a stronger overall business in the long run. Shell’s dividend yield stands at over 5% at the moment, which suggests that the company may offer a large margin of safety. Sure, the oil price could come under pressure, and the company’s future may be uncertain. But with free cash flow set to improve and the company engaging in an asset disposal programme, I’m upbeat about its financial outlook. As a result, I feel that Shell’s dividend prospects could improve over the medium term. About Robert Stephens 4520 Articles Robert Stephens is a CFA Charterholder and an Equity Analyst by trade. He is a passionate private investor who has been buying and selling shares for many years, owning a wide range of UK shares in the process. He has written for Citywire and The Motley Fool US and now runs his own business. To contact Robert, please email info@investomania.co.uk or use one of the other contact methods available on the 'Contact Us' page
26/11/2017
10:53
ariane: Dutch Shell plc or GlaxoSmithKline plc? Edward Sheldon | Sunday, 26th November, 2017 | More on: GSK RDSB Photo: Royal Dutch Shell. Fair use. Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) and GlaxoSmithKline (LSE: GSK) are two of the most popular dividend stocks in the FTSE 100 index. I own both in my own portfolio. However, neither Shell nor Glaxo are perfect dividend stocks, in my view. Both have struggled with profitability in recent years, and as a result, have not increased their payouts. Today, I’m comparing the two companies. Is one a better dividend stock than the other? Dividend yield Beginning the analysis by looking at each company’s yield reveals that GlaxoSmithKline has a higher dividend yield than Shell right now. Shell paid its shareholders $1.88 in dividends last year, a yield of 5.9% at the current share price and exchange rate. Glaxo paid investors 80p per share, a yield of 6.2%. The healthcare giant wins here. Recent dividend growth Examining recent dividend growth, between 2014 and 2016, Shell paid shareholders $1.88, $1.88 and $1.88. No growth was recorded, however, with the pound having fallen against the dollar, UK investors will have enjoyed a rise in the yield. In comparison, Glaxo, which declares its payout in GBP, paid 80p, 80p and 80p in that time. Again, no growth. However, the company did pay a special dividend of 20p per share in 2015. On that basis, I’ll give Glaxo the win in this department too. Dividend cover City analysts expect Shell to generate earnings per share of $2 this year. That gives a dividend coverage ratio of just 1.06 times last year’s payout. In comparison, analysts expect Glaxo’s earnings to come in at 111p. That gives a coverage ratio of 1.39 times last year’s payout. Glaxo has the upper hand here, although neither ratio is strong. Valuation GlaxoSmithKline shares are also cheaper than Shell shares right now. The healthcare specialist sports a forward looking P/E ratio of just 11.8, vs 15.9 for Shell. So far, Glaxo looks to be the better dividend stock. However, I’m not entirely convinced that it is. Dividend outlook The reason I say this is that Shell appears to have momentum at the moment. The oil price is back up to around $60 per barrel, and at that price, Shell can generate decent levels of free cash flow. With the merger of BG Group complete, Shell’s dividend is looking more and more sustainable, assuming the oil price doesn’t crash again. The stock’s 10% gain over the last three months reflects this. In contrast, I’m getting more concerned about the sustainability of Glaxo’s dividend. Free cash flow is low, and with the group looking at potential acquisitions such as that of Pfizer, there could be implications for the payout. When asked recently whether such a deal would carry dividend risk, CEO Emma Walmsley replied: “We confirmed our intentions to pay the dividend in 2017 of 80 pence and again in 2018 and then we will be returning to declaring the dividend quarterly and not giving a more specific outlook beyond that.” Lack of long-term dividend assurance has rattled investors, with the stock falling 15% over the last three months. The market clearly has doubts about the sustainability of GlaxoSmithKline̵7;s dividend. So while Glaxo has the lower valuation, higher yield and better coverage, if I was to pick one dividend stock between the two right now, I’d be inclined to go with Shell. I believe there’s less chance of a dividend cut with Shell, assuming the oil price doesn’t plummet again.
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