Buy
Sell
Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Royal Dutch Shell Plc LSE:RDSA London Ordinary Share GB00B03MLX29 'A' ORD EUR0.07
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -8.60 -0.6% 1,421.60 1,422.20 1,422.80 1,448.20 1,417.60 1,442.40 9,910,572 16:35:14
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Oil & Gas Producers 13,205.3 -19,723.5 -203.3 - 58,303

Royal Dutch Shell Share Discussion Threads

Showing 2726 to 2742 of 2925 messages
Chat Pages: 117  116  115  114  113  112  111  110  109  108  107  106  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
01/12/2020
08:08
Https://www.argusmedia.com/en/news/2164705-shell-opens-subic-oil-import-facility-in-philippines
waldron
01/12/2020
07:18
THE SCOTSMAN Shell: Court case in Netherlands could force fossil fuel companies to get out of oil and gas altogether – Dr Richard Dixon Shell is in court today in the Netherlands for the first day of a case which could see them have to get out of fossil fuels altogether. By Richard Dixon Tuesday, 1st December 2020, 7:00 am Fossil fuel companies will be nervously watching a court case in the Netherlands which seeks to make oil giant shell change its strategy, says Richard Dixon Shell is the second-biggest oil company in the world and around the globe it is responsible for twice as much carbon dioxide emissions as the country it is based in, the Netherlands. And, despite knowing about the role of fossil fuels in climate change for decades and despite the targets in the Paris Agreement of 2015, the company is still investing in expanding production and has actively tried to block action on the climate crisis. In April 2018, our sister Friends of the Earth group in the Netherlands and six other organisations announced they would take Shell to court if it did not change course. In April 2019, the court case began, and it is now backed by over 17,000 ordinary citizens as co-plaintiffs. There are expected to be four days of hearings this month with a judgement from the court expected in January.
the grumpy old men
01/12/2020
06:52
BHP seals deal with Shell to fuel LNG-powered ship fleet December 1, 2020 — 4.10pm Mining giant BHP has awarded Shell a landmark contract to supply fuel for the world's first fleet of liquefied natural gas-powered Newcastlemax bulk carriers as it seeks to lower shipping emissions. As part of the company's pledge to slash emissions across its supply chain, BHP this year said it would charter five vessels from Eastern Pacific Shipping, powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG) instead of bunker fuel, to carry 10 million tonnes of iron ore a year from Australia to China from 2022. BHP has awarded Shell a contract to fuel the world's first fleet of LNG-powered bulk carriers. BHP has awarded Shell a contract to fuel the world's first fleet of LNG-powered bulk carriers.Credit:Robert Peet Using carriers powered by LNG rather than diesel would eliminate NOx (nitrogen oxide) and SOx (sulphur oxide) emissions, and sharply reduce carbon dioxide emissions, according to the miner. BHP chief commercial officer Vandita Pant said awarding the contract to Shell marked a significant step in the company's ambitions of reducing the carbon footprint across its shipping supply chain. "LNG-fuelled vessels are forecast to help BHP reduce carbon dioxide-equivalent emissions by 30 per cent on a per-voyage basis compared to a conventional fuelled voyage between WA and China, and contribute to our 2030 goal to support 40 per cent emissions-intensity reduction of BHP-chartered shipping of our products," Ms Pant said. BHP 'sets new bar' with carbon cuts targeting steel mills, shippers The contract, which BHP said was the result of a tender process including several potential LNG suppliers, comes as the resources industry faces pressure from some of the world's biggest investors to expand their carbon-reduction ambitions to take responsibility for emissions caused by the transport and end-use of their resources around the world, known as "Scope 3" emissions. BHP earlier this year became the first major resources company to commit to Scope 3 targets, aiming for a 30 per cent reduction in the emissions intensity of customers like steel mills and power plants that purchase their products, as well as the 40 per cent cut across its chartered shipping. Shell Energy executive vice-president Steve Hill congratulated BHP on reducing emissions in their maritime supply chain with the world's first LNG-fuelled Newcastlemax bulk carriers. "Decarbonisation of the shipping industry must begin today and LNG is the cleanest fuel currently available in meaningful volumes," he said. "This LNG bunkering contract strengthens the bunkering market in the region and we look forward to working with BHP and other customers in the maritime sector on their journey to a net-zero emissions future." In the shipping industry's biggest overhaul in decades, new emissions standards were introduced this year slashing sulphur levels permitted in maritime fuel. The changes prompted exporters including BHP to seek out cleaner alternatives to heavy fuel known as bunker fuel, which, until now, has been the shipping industry's main fuel source. The United Nations International Maritime Organisation has also set goals to halve carbon dioxide emissions generated by shipping by 2050 compared to 2008 levels. Mining BHP Billiton Nick Toscano Business reporter for The Age and Sydney Morning Herald.
the grumpy old men
30/11/2020
18:13
Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 47.36 -1.84% Gasoline NYMEX 1.23 -2.56% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.90 +1.83% WTI 44.845 USD -0.69% FTSE 100 6,266.19 -1.59% Dow Jones 29,564.16 -1.16% CAC 40 5,575.16 -0.41% SBF 120 4,408.75 -0.44% Euro STOXX 50 3,492.54 -1.24% DAX 13,291.16 -0.33% Ftse Mib 22,191.88 -0.72% Eni 8.303 -3.25% Total 36.57 -3.00% Engie 12.51 -0.08% Orange 10.655 -0.33% Bp 247.65 -5.80% Vodafone 123.68 -0.98% Royal Dutch Shell A 1,271.2 -5.09% Royal Dutch Shell B 1,234.2 -5.35% TULLOW 27.87 -3.83% (-1.11)
waldron
30/11/2020
17:44
market (FTSE100) collapsed some 60 points in the last minute of trading.. I have never seen that
undervaluedassets
30/11/2020
11:30
The Shell share price rallied 10% last week. Here’s what I’d do right now Jonathan Smith | Monday, 30th November, 2020 | More on: RDSB The Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) share price was one of the best performing FTSE 100 stocks last week. If we extend the time period to look at the past month, it’s up almost 50%. It’s true that the FTSE 100 has enjoyed a strong performance as a whole, but the Shell share price is still outperforming its Footsie peers. What’s been going on here? Why have Shell shares rallied? One of the reasons the Shell share price has performed well in the short term is the oil price. Crude oil was trading around $35 at the beginning of the month. Now it’s trading above $45. Historically, there’s been a strong correlation between the Shell share price and oil. After all, the business is what we call “vertically integrated” with oil. This means it’s active in all stages of the process. From exploration projects in oil fields, to refining it and then selling it in different forms. Therefore, it’s logical that the share price is heavily impacted by the oil price. On top of this, there’s been another external factor benefiting the company. The positive news last week, and in preceding weeks, about several different vaccines proving effective is a huge boost for Shell. If we rewind to Q2 results, oil products sales volumes were down 39%. This was mostly due to the aviation and retail sectors, as the pandemic meant consumers were staying at home. Demand for oil products simply wasn’t there. Now, if we flip to the prospect of a viable vaccine, flight demand should increase. I wrote a piece recently on how this could benefit the easyJet share price. Indirectly, demand for the refined products Shell offers will increase. This should have a knock on impact via a higher share price. What would I do now? The Shell share price still sits at a large discount compared to its level in January 2020. At 1,340p, the January level of 2,200p seen a long way away. So as a long-term buyer, Shell is definitely on my watchlist. But would I buy today? Perhaps not. In the short term, the reasons causing the rally aren’t really Shell-specific. The oil price and vaccine news benefit lots of other businesses as well. The rally hasn’t come from Shell doing something amazing. This makes me cautious of investing right now, and so I’m going to sit on the sidelines for the next few weeks. More in-depth Q4 results should be due in January. This, along with guidance for 2021, should give me a clearer picture on whether Shell should be my oil major of choice, instead of BP or other oil-related stocks. A big driver for me would also be any news about reinstating the full dividend that was cut earlier this year. I remember when I used to own Shell stock, I picked up a dividend yield of 5%-7%. A very generous yield returning would likely further boost the Shell share price as income investors buy the stock. Motley Fool UK
the grumpy old men
30/11/2020
08:06
Russia's Nord Stream 2 pipeline project set to restart after year's hiatus Nov. 29, 2020 9:53 PM ETPublic Joint Stock Company Gazprom (OGZPY)By: Carl Surran, SA News Editor16 Comments Construction work is set to resume later this week on the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline after being stopped for a year because of U.S. sanctions designed to end the pipeline that will bring Russian gas to Germany. Nord Stream 2 says undersea pipe-laying work will resume on a 2.6-km section of each of the gas pipeline's branches within Germany's exclusive economic zone. The Gazprom-led (OTCPK:OGZPY) project, designed to deliver up to 55B cm/year when completed, would double the amount of natural gas that Germany can import from Russia, raising the ire of the U.S. government, which says the pipeline will increase European dependence on Russian energy supplies. The U.S. Congress has been considering another bill that would widen the scope of sanctions to include any individual or entity providing insurance, technical certification or welding services for the project. But so far, none of Nord Stream 2's European financial backers - Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B), Germany's Uniper (OTC:UNPPY) and BASF (OTCQX:BASFY), Austria's OMV (OTCPK:OMVJF) and France's Engie (OTCPK:ENGIY) - have pulled out despite the escalating U.S. anger.
waldron
29/11/2020
10:26
Https://seekingalpha.com/article/4391883-royal-dutch-shell-climate-focused-oil-major?utm_medium=email&utm_source=seeking_alpha&mail_subject=rds-a-royal-dutch-shell-a-climate-focused-oil-major&utm_campaign=rta-stock-article&utm_content=link-0
the grumpy old men
29/11/2020
08:55
rt.com Shell must pay nearly half a billion for oil spill in Nigeria, court rules 28 Nov, 2020 14:16 Shell must pay nearly half a billion for oil spill in Nigeria, court rules Nigeria’s Supreme Court has declined an application from Royal Dutch Shell which aimed to set aside a previous ruling that ordered the company to pay $467 million for damages caused by an oil spill almost five decades ago. The judges upheld the previous decision, which ruled that the oil conglomerate must pay damages for an oil spillage in Ejama-Ebubu in Rivers State. According to Bloomberg and local media reports, the five-member panel said that Shell’s request to review the case lacked merit. The case centers around an oil spill that occurred in 1970 from Shell’s oil production activities in the Niger delta. The case was brought to court in 2001 by the Ejama-Ebubu community, which has accused the company of making their water sources unfit for human consumption. In 2010, a Nigerian court ruled that the company was liable for an oil spill in the community, but Shell still disputes its responsibility and says that it has cleaned the area. “It is regrettable that the legal process in this case has been focused for so long on procedural issues and not the merits of the case,” Shell said in a statement responding to the latest ruling on Friday. Still disputing the Ejama-Ebubu claim, the company insists that “any attempt to enforce payment should not be permitted” due to other ongoing court proceedings. “We have always maintained that we are ready to defend this case based on the available facts,” Shell said, as cited by Bloomberg. Shell and its subsidiaries have also fought several lawsuits over oil spills in the Niger Delta, with legal tussles ongoing in the Hague and in the British courts, which previously sided with the oil giant. Last year, a UK court blocked the enforcement of damages against the major. Shell was previously forced to pay for massive oil spills in Nigeria that occurred in 2008 and 2009, considered to be the biggest in decades of oil exploration the country. The Bodo fishing community, whose territory was polluted as the result of the incident, sued the company, which agreed to pay $83 million in compensation in 2015. For more stories on economy & finance visit RT's business section
the grumpy old men
28/11/2020
17:09
Nigerian Supreme Court Upholds Oil Spill Award Against Shell Elisha Bala-Gbogbo, Bloomberg News AddThis Sharing Buttons Share to Facebook Share to TwitterShare to LinkedInShare to EmailShare to Plus d'options... (Bloomberg) -- Nigeria’s Supreme Court dismissed an application by Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s local unit to review a $467-million award for damages caused by an oil spill half a century ago. Justice Olabode Rhodes-Vivour led a five-member panel of the court Friday that unanimously dismissed Shell’s bid for lacking merit. The court upheld a 2010 ruling against the company for spills in Ejama-Ebubu community in Ogoni, Rivers state, in the legal tussle that has lasted more than three decades. The spill was caused by third parties during Nigeria’s civil war in the late 1960s, resulting in significant damage to its pipelines in the region, Shell said in a statement on Friday. While it has since cleaned the area and remediated the affected sites, it doesn’t accept responsibility for the spills, the oil firm said. “It is regrettable that the legal process in this case has been focused for so long on procedural issues and not the merits of the case,” a company statement read. “It is our position that any attempt to enforce payment should not be permitted” due to other ongoing court proceedings. Shell in December won a U.K. ruling preventing London courts from enforcing the award, saying the proceedings that led to the award was unfair because it was denied an opportunity to present a defense. Shell, the largest oil producer in Nigeria, have been beset by lawsuits involving the West African nation, many of them in courts in the Hague and the U.K., for its part in spills in Nigeria’s oil-rich Niger River delta region. While the company in 2015 agreed to pay $83 million in compensation to thousands of residents of the Bodo community for two “highly regrettable” spills in 2008, it disputes the Ejama-Ebubu claim. “We have always maintained that we are ready to defend this case based on the available facts,” Shell said.
waldron
27/11/2020
17:42
Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 48.00 +0.76% Gasoline NYMEX 1.26 +0.55% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.84 -2.87% WTI 45.31 USD +0.78% FTSE 100 6,367.58 +0.07% Dow Jones 29,890.79 +0.06% CAC 40 5,598.18 +0.56% SBF 120 4,428.16 +0.61% Euro STOXX 50 3,527.79 +0.32% DAX 13,335.68 +0.37% Ftse Mib 22,343.09 +0.64% Eni 8.582 +0.28% Total 37.7 +0.90% Engie 12.52 -0.04% Orange 10.69 +1.47% Bp 262.9 -0.23% Vodafone 124.9 -0.62% Royal Dutch Shell A 1,339.4 -0.06% Royal Dutch Shell B 1,304 +0.40% Tullow Oil (TLW) : 28.98: -1.81 (-5.88%)
waldron
26/11/2020
09:43
Alfiex 26 Nov '20 - 09:29 - 1639 of 1639 0 0 0 Sorry wrong link should have gone to specsavers Https://www.investing.com/commodities/brent-oil
grupo guitarlumber
22/11/2020
13:48
Shell process to make blue hydrogen production affordable , 1 hours, 41 minutes ago Shell Catalysts and Technologies is launching the Shell Blue Hydrogen Process, which integrates proven technologies to increase significantly the affordability of greenfield projects for “blue” hydrogen production from natural gas along with carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS). Affordable blue hydrogen enables the decarbonisation of hard-to-abate heavy industries while creating value for refiners and resource holders. Shell’s new process can reduce the levellised cost of hydrogen by 22 per cent compared with the best the market has to offer today. Without low-carbon hydrogen, the net-zero goals announced by governments and companies will be difficult to achieve. Currently, hydrogen production is nearly all “grey” (from hydrocarbons without CCUS). If hydrogen is to contribute to carbon neutrality, it must be produced on a much larger scale and with far lower emission levels. Blue hydrogen production can be relatively easily scaled up to meet demand. With carbon dioxide (CO2) costing $25–35/t, blue hydrogen becomes competitive against grey, even with its higher capital costs. And green hydrogen, produced from the renewable-energy powered electrolysis of water, may still be more than double the price of blue hydrogen by 2030 and not achieve cost parity until about 2045. Advantages This analysis is based on conventional steam methane reforming (SMR) and autothermal reforming (ATR) technologies. The availability of the Shell Blue Hydrogen Process, which integrates proprietary Shell gas partial oxidation (SGP) technology with ADIP ULTRA solvent technology, further improves blue hydrogen economics. A key advantage of SGP technology over ATR is that the partial oxidation reaction does not require steam. Instead, high-pressure steam is generated, which satisfies the steam demands of the process and some other power consumers. There is also no need for feed gas pretreatment, which simples the process line-up. And SGP gives refiners greater feed flexibility, as it is more robust against feed contaminants and can thus accommodate a large range of natural gas qualities. Compared with ATR, SGP technology gives a 22 per cent lower levellised cost of hydrogen from: • 17 per cent lower capital expenditure (higher operating pressure giving smaller hydrogen compressor and CO2 capture and compressor units). • 34 per cent lower operating expenditure (excluding the natural gas feedstock price) from reduced compression duties and more steam generation. Modelling shows that, compared with an ATR unit, a Shell Blue Hydrogen Process line-up producing 500 t/d of pure hydrogen would have: • $30 million per year lower operating expenditure. • More than 99 per cent CO2 capture. • 10–25 per cent lower levellised cost of hydrogen. When compared with SMR, SGP technology leads to even greater hydrogen production cost savings from both the capital and operating expenditure perspectives. Process maturity and experience Shell began research into SGP technology in the 1950s. Today, the technology has more than 30 active residue and gas gasification licensees, and there are more than 100 SGP gasifiers worldwide. For example, at the Pearl gas-to-liquids plant, Qatar, 18 SGP trains, each with an equivalent pure hydrogen production capacity of 500 t/d, have been operating since 2011. Since 1997, Pernis refinery, the Netherlands, has been operating at a 1-Mt/y CO2 capture capacity using SGP technology. Shell also has CCUS experience through its involvement in multiple projects in different phases of development, and can offer key technologies and insights into CO2 capture, compression, transport, utilisation and storage. —Tradearabia News Service
the grumpy old men
21/11/2020
11:45
Invisage 20 Nov '20 - 23:21 - 5241 of 5242 0 0 0 Https://www.ig.com/uk/news-and-trade-ideas/bp-and-shell-shares--attractive-catch-up-trade-amid-energy-price-201117
grupo
21/11/2020
11:08
Renewed Lockdowns Threaten More Refinery Closures In Europe By Tsvetana Paraskova - Nov 20, 2020, 4:00 PM CST More refineries in Europe are at risk of permanent closures, with fuel demand on the continent falling again as major economies re-imposed lockdowns to fight the spike in coronavirus cases. Gasoline demand in Europe is expected to be between 15 and 20 percent lower in November and December compared to the same months of 2019, Argus reported, citing market participants. The new lockdowns, partial lockdowns, and curfews in the biggest economies in Europe, including the UK, Germany, France, Italy, and Spain, are dragging down oil demand again while a double-dip recession in the Eurozone and wider Europe now looks almost inevitable. Refiners have struggled since the spring with the crash in fuel demand, and many of them are restructuring operations, including closing down permanently crude oil processing capacity. Petroineos, a joint venture of Ineos and PetroChina, said earlier this month it plans to permanently close some units at the 210,000-bpd Grangemouth refinery, the only refinery in Scotland, which will cut the facility’s refining capacity to 150,000 bpd. Neste of Finland said in September that it was exploring the shutdown of its refinery operations in Naantali and transforming the Porvoo refinery operations to co-processing renewable and circular raw materials. “The forthcoming operating and maintenance investments in the Naantali refinery are not viable nor sustainable in a situation where there is large over-capacity for oil refining globally,” Neste’s President and CEO Peter Vanacker said in September. Refiners in the United States are also idling refinery capacity and cutting jobs to cope with the losses from the demand crash. Refiners around the world have been announcing permanent closures of refinery capacity this year, but significant overcapacity still remains, the International Energy Agency (IEA) said in its monthly Oil Market Report last week. Permanent shutdowns of refinery capacity have reached 1.7 million bpd. But more than 20 million bpd crude oil distillation capacity now sits idle, the Paris-based agency said, noting that “there remains significant structural overcapacity.” By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com
grupo
20/11/2020
17:46
Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 44.34 +0.29% Gasoline NYMEX 1.17 +0.28% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.78 +1.98% WTI 41.86 USD +0.56% FTSE 100 6,351.45 +0.27% Dow Jones 29,392.74 -0.31% CAC 40 5,495.89 +0.39% SBF 120 4,344.64 +0.32% Euro STOXX 50 3,467.03 +0.45% DAX 13,137.25 +0.39% Ftse Mib 21,698.05 +0.75% Eni 8.125 +0.59% Total 34.5 +1.14% Engie 12.165 +0.91% Orange 10.41 +0.24% Bp 244.4 +0.27% Vodafone 123.18 +1.25% Royal Dutch Shell A 1,244.8 +1.53% Royal Dutch Shell B 1,196.8 +1.23% Tullow Oil (TLW) 25.37 0.62 (2.51%)
waldron
20/11/2020
08:46
Oil Majors Are Paying The Price For Investing In Renewables By Alex Kimani - Nov 19, 2020, 7:00 PM CST Big Oil has been frequently lambasted for trying to burnish its green credentials through half-hearted investments in renewables. That might have been true for much of the past decade, but it appears to be changing as the oil and gas majors have started putting down big money into clean energy. For instance, European oil majors including BP Plc. (NYSE:BP), Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A), Eni SpA (NYSE:E), Total SA (NYSE:TOT), and Norwegian national oil company Equinor ASA (NYSE:EQNR) have already invested billions of dollars in renewable energy and made big clean energy commitments. Yet, Big Oil just can’t seem to catch a break, with stocks of oil and gas companies that are investing heavily in renewables being punished by the markets. A good case in point is BP, one of the oil majors with some of the largest clean energy commitments. BP has announced plans to achieve net-zero status by 2030 by dramatically increasing its renewables spending. BP stock has, however, cratered 48% in the year-to-date, considerably worse than Europe’s oil and gas benchmark STOXX Europe 600 Oil & Gas Index (SXEP) which is down 32% in the year-to-date or even the Energy Select Sector Fund (XLE) which has lost 41%. BP’s European peer Shell has probably done more than any other supermajor as far as investing in renewable energy goes. Recently, Shell CEO Ben van Beurden told investors that the company no longer considers itself an oil and gas company but an energy transition company. Shell has been vocal about the shift to renewables, frequently issuing the clarion call for the industry to switch to cleaner energy sources. In 2016, Shell set an ambitious goal to invest $4bn to $6bn in clean energy projects by 2020. Shell stock is down 44% YTD. Related: Why Iraq Isn’t Producing 10 Million Barrels Per Day Yet Meanwhile, ENI has the most ambitious climate change pledge with plans to lower its greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050. ENI also says that its renewable portfolio will reach an installed capacity of 3 GW as early as 2023 and 5 GW in 2025. ENI stock has tanked 38%. Clean energy transition What’s going on here clearly is a case of damned if you do and damned if you don’t. The big problem here stems from the way the renewable sector operates. Green energy requires heavy upfront investments with longer payback periods compared to fossil fuel investments. In fact, green infrastructure is 1.5-3.0x more capital- and labor-intensive than hydrocarbons. Oil and gas firms are still grappling with the best way to presently use dwindling cash flows; in effect, they are still weighing whether it's worthwhile to at least partially reinvent themselves as renewables businesses while also determining which low-carbon energy markets offer the most attractive future returns. Most renewable ventures, like solar and wind projects, tend to churn out cash flows akin to annuities for several decades after initial up-front capital expenditure with generally low price risk as opposed to their current models with faster payback but high oil price risk. With the need to generate quick shareholder returns, some fossil fuel companies have actually been scaling back their clean energy investments. By investing their cash flows in clean energy projects, the oil majors are likely to reap the benefits in the future--but at the expense of today’s dividends and buybacks. In other words, it’s a bit like the markets want to eat their cake and still have it. Clean energy spinoffs Obviously, pure-play renewable companies get a lot more leeway from the markets despite the majority still being unprofitable. For instance, the solar sector boasts a median P/E GAAP (FWD) of 31.3 vs. 10.9 for U.S. oil and gas companies thanks to the former’s much better top-and bottom-line growth prospects. In contrast, even the most bullish oil outlook calls for only anemic growth for oil and gas demand over the next decade, meaning pretty limited growth runways for Big Oil. Further, renewables still make up a minuscule fraction of their revenues for most oil majors, meaning it might take many more years of clean energy investments before they can reflect on their valuations. But maybe Big Oil won’t have to wait too long before they can reap the dividends. RBC Capital Markets analyst Biraj Borkhataria has told Barron’s that the oil majors are likely to start spinning off their renewable businesses once they achieve scale if this valuation disconnect persists. Indeed, Biraj says that standalone valuations of Equinor’s, Energia’s, and Total’s low-carbon businesses currently clock in at 17%, 15%, and 10%, respectively, of their enterprise valuations. Given how aggressively these companies have been investing in renewables, it probably won’t come as a surprise if the value of their clean energy portfolios double in the next five or so years. That represents a huge amount of value that these companies will no doubt be looking to unlock several years down the line. By Alex Kimani for Oilprice.com
grupo guitarlumber
Chat Pages: 117  116  115  114  113  112  111  110  109  108  107  106  Older
ADVFN Advertorial
Your Recent History
LSE
RDSA
Royal Dutc..
Register now to watch these stocks streaming on the ADVFN Monitor.

Monitor lets you view up to 110 of your favourite stocks at once and is completely free to use.

By accessing the services available at ADVFN you are agreeing to be bound by ADVFN's Terms & Conditions

P: V: D:20210510 22:01:46