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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Royal Dutch Shell Plc LSE:RDSA London Ordinary Share GB00B03MLX29 'A' ORD EUR0.07
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  38.00 2.68% 1,458.40 1,459.60 1,460.00 1,466.80 1,424.80 1,429.40 3,827,582 16:35:01
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Oil & Gas Producers 13,205.3 -19,723.5 -203.3 - 59,812

Royal Dutch Shell Share Discussion Threads

Showing 2926 to 2942 of 2950 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
14/6/2021
17:55
Oil majors actively pursuing renewable power projects for long-term sustainability, says analyst Features & AnalysisPowerOil & Gas By James Murray 14 Jun 2021 Analysis by GlobalData said the portfolio restructuring will help the industry’s largest companies to reduce their carbon intensity India renewable energy investment Within the renewable power sector, solar and wind energy are expected to show the highest growth rates over the next 10 years (Credit: Shutterstock/hrui) The oil majors are actively pursuing renewable power projects for long-term sustainability as demand for fossil fuels is expected to fall in the coming years, says an analyst. Analysis by data and analytics firm GlobalData said the portfolio restructuring will help the industry’s largest companies to reduce their carbon intensity and align themselves with the changing energy mix in the long run. It claims oil and gas engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) vendors are enabling the energy transition by “building capabilities to set up renewable energy infrastructure”;. “Global power demand is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 2.5% from 2020 to 2030,” said Ravindra Puranik, oil and gas analyst at GlobalData. “A significant portion of this will be fulfilled by renewable power generation. This growth outlook makes renewable power a key market for players across the energy sector, including oil and gas companies whose traditional market is at risk amid the transition to low-carbon sources.” Oil majors BP, Equinor and Shell investing in renewable power projects Within the renewable power sector, solar and wind energy are expected to show the highest growth rates over the next 10 years. GlobalData projects solar power generation, including solar PV and solar thermal, to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 11.9% between 2020 and 2030. Meanwhile, onshore and offshore wind segments are expected to collectively grow at a CAGR of 9.4% over the same period. “Various governments are actively focusing on reducing carbon emissions and have enacted laws to facilitate decarbonisation in their countries,” said Puranik. “Electrification, based on renewable energy sources, is an ideal approach to reduce carbon emissions. It also marks a strategic shift away from fossil fuels in the global effort to mitigate the threat to climate change.” A key driver enabling the transition to renewables is falling costs. Traditionally, clean energy projects had a significant cost disadvantage over coal- and gas-fired power plants. But in recent years, their economic competitiveness has improved significantly due to government policies and incentives, as well as technological advances. “This has incentivised oil and gas majors such as BP, Equinor and Shell to invest in wind power generation,” said Puranik. “BP and Total are also leading the way in terms of upcoming solar power capacity.” GlobalData notes that the growing role of renewable energy poses a “major threat” to fossil fuel-based power generation. It added that the share of natural gas-based power generation will be “threatened221; by renewables growth and is likely to be the “next biggest loser” in the global power generation mix after coal.
florenceorbis
07/6/2021
07:52
07/06/2021 7:00am UK Regulatory (RNS & others) TIDMRDSA TIDMRDSB The Hague, June 7, 2021 - The Board of Royal Dutch Shell plc ("RDS") today announced the pounds sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments in respect of the first quarter 2021 interim dividend, which was announced on April 29, 2021 at US$0.1735 per A ordinary share ("A Share") and B ordinary share ("B Share"). Dividends on A Shares will be paid, by default, in euros at the rate of EUR0.1426 per A Share. Holders of A Shares who have validly submitted US dollars or pounds sterling currency elections by May 28, 2021 will be entitled to a dividend of US$0.1735 or 12.26p per A Share, respectively. Dividends on B Shares will be paid, by default, in pounds sterling at the rate of 12.26p per B Share. Holders of B Shares who have validly submitted US dollars or euros currency elections by May 28, 2021 will be entitled to a dividend of US$0.1735 or EUR0.1426 per B Share, respectively. Euro and pounds sterling dividends payable in cash have been converted from US dollars based on an average of market exchange rates over the three dealing days from 2 June to 4 June 2021. This dividend will be payable on June 21, 2021 to those members whose names were on the Register of Members on May 14, 2021. Taxation - cash dividend Cash dividends on A Shares will be subject to the deduction of Dutch dividend withholding tax at the rate of 15%, which may be reduced in certain circumstances. Non-Dutch resident shareholders, depending on their particular circumstances, may be entitled to a full or partial refund of Dutch dividend withholding tax. If you are uncertain as to the tax treatment of any dividends you should consult your tax advisor. Note A different currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies.
florenceorbis
06/6/2021
07:23
Putin Says That First Line Of Nord Stream 2 Is Now Complete By RFE/RL staff - Jun 05, 2021, 4:00 PM CDT Trade Oil Futures And Energy Stocks Russian President Vladimir Putin has announced that laying the pipes for the first of two lines of the prospective Nord Stream 2 pipeline to Germany has now been "successfully completed." Addressing an economic forum in St. Petersburg on June 4, Putin also said that "work on the second line is continuing." While the underwater section still needs to be linked to the section on German territory, Russian energy giant Gazprom "is ready to start filing Nord Stream 2 with gas," he added. Gazprom shares went up 0.6 percent after Putin's comments, reaching 273.80 rubles ($3.74) -- their highest level since mid-2008. The United States, which has strongly opposed construction of the new Russian pipeline, last month announced new sanctions against Russian companies and ships involved in the project. But the administration of President Joe Biden decided to waive sanctions against the company overseeing the project and its CEO. In Washington, the move was met with criticism from Republicans and some Democrats, while the Kremlin hailed it as a "positive signal" ahead of a June 16 summit between Biden and Putin. The Baltic Sea pipeline was at the center of a political tussle between Berlin and Washington during the previous administration of former U.S. President Donald Trump. Since coming into office in January, Biden has sought to heal relations with Europe after they were bruised under his predecessor. U.S. officials have warned the pipeline will make Europe more dependent on Russian energy supplies and bypass Ukraine, which relies on gas transit fees. The German government has refused to halt the project, arguing that it is a commercial venture and sovereign issue. Putin told the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum that Russia will continue pumping 40 billion cubic meters of gas via Ukraine a year in line with the existing five-year contract. Kyiv is locked in a confrontation with Moscow over Russia's 2014 seizure of Ukraine's Black Sea Crimean Peninsula and the Kremlin's support of separatists in eastern Ukraine. Describing the U.S. use of the dollar as a political weapon, Putin also said that European states should pay for Russian gas in euros, a day after Moscow said it would remove dollar assets from its National Wealth Fund while increasing the share of the euro, Chinese yuan, and gold. "The euro is completely acceptable for us in terms of gas payments. This can be done, of course, and probably should be done," he said. Russia has long moved to reduce the dollar's share in its hard-currency reserves as it has faced waves of U.S. sanctions amid heightened tensions with the West over issues including the conflict in Ukraine, cyberattacks allegedly by Russian hackers, and Russia's treatment of jailed opposition activist Aleksei Navalny. In an interview with state-run Channel One television on the sidelines of the St. Petersburg forum, Putin said he expected "no breakthrough" from his meeting with Biden, but expressed hope that the talks will be held in a "positive atmosphere." "But the very fact of our meeting, that we will speak about possibilities for restoring bilateral relations, about matters of mutual interest, and, by the way, there are a lot of them, is quite good as such," he added. Late last month, Biden said he would press his Russian counterpart to respect human rights when the two leaders meet. The U.S. president in March said he believed Putin was a "killer," which prompted a diplomatic row that led to Moscow recalling its ambassador to Washington for consultations. By RF/ERL More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:
adrian j boris
05/6/2021
08:43
ihsmarkit.com/research-analysis/germany-pledges-10-billion-for-hydrogen-projects-by-shell-bp-t.html Climate and Sustainability Research & Analysis Germany pledges $10 billion for hydrogen projects backed by Shell, BP, Total, others 04 June 2021 Cristina Brooks Majors BP and Shell, utilities like Vattenfall and RWE, and chemical refiners like BASF, Linde, and Dow all are likely to benefit from promised German state funding for 62 hydrogen projects. Their projects are due a share of over €8 billion ($9.73 billion) in German state and federal funds announced jointly by Germany's Federal Ministry of Economics and Federal Ministry of Transport on 28 May. An additional €20 billion ($24 billion) in backing for projects is set to come from private investors and other sources so that funding levels reach an expected €33 billion ($40 billion). Germany's funding for the projects is contingent on the outcome of an application for EU State Aid law exemptions under the EU's Important Project of Common European Interest (IPCEI) program. The EU put out a call for proposals to regional companies to join a hydrogen IPCEI in December.
waldron
05/6/2021
08:31
ihsmarkit.com/research-analysis/germany-pledges-10-billion-for-hydrogen-projects-by-shell-bp-t.html
waldron
04/6/2021
18:26
Is Royal Dutch Shell Stock a Buy? Shell had a solid plan for the future. Or at least it did until things got a little more complicated. What should investors do now? Reuben Gregg Brewer (TMFReubenGBrewer) Jun 4, 2021 at 11:25AM Author Bio Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.B) is one of the largest integrated energy companies on Earth. That has put it in the crosshairs of environmentalists looking to take on global warming. The company has started to do something about this issue, but it may not be enough to satisfy detractors. That could make life much more difficult for Shell and its shareholders. The big change Shell made the very difficult decision in 2020 to cut its dividend by a huge 65%. There were two reasons why the giant energy company took this step. First, drilling for oil requires a lot of capital investment, and at the time weak oil prices were making it difficult to fund spending needs. Second, the company announced plans to alter the makeup of its business, shifting toward growth in cleaner energy businesses and reducing its emphasis on oil. A smiling person in front of wind turbines. Image source: Getty Images. That second announcement was notable, as it meant that Shell had heard what investors, governments, and environmentalists were saying about reducing carbon and it was taking action. Some of its peers, notably Chevron and ExxonMobil were, and for the most part still are, dragging their feet on this front. Shell's goal is to get to net zero carbon by 2050, with interim goals of a 20% reduction by 2030 and a 45% reduction by 2035. There are a lot of moving parts to this plan, but it entails reducing oil production, increasing natural gas exposure, and ramping up investment in renewable energy. Shell is not new to the clean energy space either, so it has some expertise to build off of. The goals seem reasonable, but there's one key thing investors have to remember -- the oil business, though shrinking, is helping to fund the transition to a cleaner future. A wrench in the gears Everything seemed lined up for Shell. It had even gotten back to increasing its dividend, now having raised it twice since the cut. That was meant as a sign to investors that the company was financially strong and could be trusted to address clean energy concerns and maintain a growing dividend over time. Based on shareholder proxy voting, investors appeared pleased with the direction the company was heading. Then Shell lost a court case in Europe around its environmental impact. TOT Dividend Per Share (Quarterly) Chart TOT Dividend Per Share (Quarterly) data by YCharts The big takeaway from the case is that Shell was told to increase the pace of its clean energy transition. The court mandated target for carbon emission reduction was 45% by 2030. That pushes forward the 2035 goal by five years, but means more than doubling the carbon reduction originally planned for 2030. This is a massive change. The company responded by outlining the steps it has taken so far and plans to take in the future. And by saying it will appeal the decision. That is the logical step for Shell, but investors need to consider what happens if it loses this fight. Most notably, it will likely have to divest more oil assets to meet the court's mandate. That means less revenue to support the shift toward clean energy. In turn, this will probably lead to increased use of the balance sheet to fund the transition. That is not an ideal solution. What to do about it? At this point, nothing is likely to happen in the near term. However, investors looking for a long-term energy investment might want to step back here and rethink how they go about putting their money to work. This isn't to suggest that Shell is a bad company, only that the court loss raises the risks for this energy company in an unpredictable way. The best alternative right now is likely Total (NYSE:TOT), which is going down a similar clean energy path, has maintained its dividend, and has shareholder support for its transition. Alternatively there is BP, but the company's 2020 dividend cut and high leverage compared to peers are issues that some may, justifiably, find concerning. That said, be prepared, if Shell does end up losing this fight, it is likely that other energy names will find themselves facing similar problems down the line. Should you invest $1,000 in Royal Dutch Shell plc right now? Before you consider Royal Dutch Shell plc, you'll want to hear this. Our award-winning analyst team just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now... and Royal Dutch Shell plc wasn't one of them. The online investing service they've run for nearly two decades, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has beaten the stock market by over 4X.* And right now, they think there are 10 stocks that are better buys. See the 10 stocks *Stock Advisor returns as of May 11, 2021 This article represents the opinion of the writer, who may disagree with the “official̶1; recommendation position of a Motley Fool premium advisory service. We’re motley! Questioning an investing thesis -- even one of our own -- helps us all think critically about investing and make decisions that help us become smarter, happier, and richer. Reuben Gregg Brewer owns shares of Total SA. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.
the grumpy old men
31/5/2021
08:16
Proactiveinvestors Philip Whiterow 13:55 Fri 28 May 2021 Shell might shrink by 12% if Dutch ruling is upheld Shell's plan will see its oil output decline by 1% to 2% per year after peaking in 2019 Royal Dutch Shell’s (LON:RDSB) shock defeat in a Dutch court over its carbon emissions might lead to a reduction of 12% in its energy output, analysts have estimated. The oil major’s own plans to become a net-zero carbon emissions company by 2050 were ruled as being too slow in a ruling in a case brought by environmental activists. Shell will appeal the decision but if it loses will have to reduce its emissions by 45% between 2019 and 2030 compared to its own plans for a 20% reduction. To hit a target of a 45% reduction would mean a 45% drop in oil sales, a decline in natural gas sales and a much larger increase in carbon offsets such as spending on reforestation said analysts at Credit Suisse This would shrink the size of Shell's business by 12% to around 18.8 exajoules (ej) of energy output, whereas Shell’s own plan would see energy output rise to 25.8ej by 2020, the broker estimates Shell's plan will see its oil output decline by 1% to 2% per year after peaking in 2019. Royal Bank of Canada calculated that a 45% cut in absolute emissions would lead to a 30% drop in oil products sales from last year and a 3% drop in oil and gas production. Shares in Shell have dropped by 2% since Wednesday and today were trading at 1,289p.
florenceorbis
28/5/2021
11:45
In his latest research note, analyst Jon Rigby confirms his positive recommendation. The broker UBS is keeping its Buy rating. The target price is still set at GBX 1860.
grupo guitarlumber
28/5/2021
09:06
Notice of Results The Hague, May 28(th) 2021 - On Thursday July 29(th) 2021 at 07:00 BST (08:00 CEST and 02:00 EDT) Royal Dutch Shell plc will release its second quarter results and second quarter interim dividend announcement for 2021.
florenceorbis
28/5/2021
08:49
Upcoming events on ROYAL DUTCH SHELL PLC JULY/29/2021 Interim 2021 Earnings Release OCTOBER/28/2021 Q3 2021 Earnings Release FEBRUARY/03/2022 FY 2021 Earnings Release (Projected) MAY/05/2022 Q1 2022 Earnings Release (Projected)
florenceorbis
28/5/2021
08:31
Already positive, the research from JP Morgan and its analyst Christyan Malek still consider the stock as a Buy opportunity. The target price continues to be set at GBX 2000.
florenceorbis
28/5/2021
08:27
DIVI DATES Https://www.shell.com/investors/dividend-information/interim-dividend-timetable.html 1st quarter 2021 The Board of Royal Dutch Shell plc has announced the intended timetable for the quarterly interim dividends. Closing of currency election date (see Note below) May 28, 2021 Pounds sterling and euro equivalents announcement date June 7, 2021 Payment date June 21, 2021
florenceorbis
27/5/2021
22:45
Dutch Left activists are threatening the global economy. The judges, the lawyers, the activists are all far left. It's a thread, nothing more than that.
lhanhart1996
27/5/2021
17:45
Expect A Wave Of Climate Lawsuits Against Big Oil Following Shell's Case By Tsvetana Paraskova - May 27, 2021, 11:00 AM CDT Trade Oil Futures Now The environmental group which scored a big win against Shell in court on Wednesday is already helping fellow organizations to sue other Big Oil companies over their contribution to climate change in what could be wave of lawsuits globally. On Wednesday, a Dutch court ordered Shell to slash its carbon emissions by 45 percent by 2030 in a landmark ruling that could set precedents for other oil companies and that orders the supermajor to cut the net carbon emissions, not the intensity of those emissions as Shell has set in its climate policy. Friends of the Earth Netherlands filed the lawsuit against Shell in the Netherlands and is now helping other organizations to force emissions reductions at other companies in other countries. “We are already supporting other organizations to set up similar cases in their countries,” Donald Pols, director of Friends of the Earth Netherlands, told Bloomberg on Thursday. “This court case and verdict open a whole new approach to climate litigation and because of its success it will be copied by other civil society organizations in the rest of the world,” Pols said. Commenting on the Dutch court ruling against Shell, Andy Palmen, interim director of Greenpeace Netherlands, said: Start Trading On OPC Markets Today CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 74-89% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money. “We can hold multinational corporations worldwide accountable for the climate crisis.” According to Verisk Maplecroft’s Environmental Risk Outlook 2021, legal liabilities related to climate are becoming more mainstream as nearly 3,000 cases have been lodged since the start of the century, “primarily aimed at changing government policy or claiming compensation from fossil fuel companies for their contributions to global heating.” North America and Europe are the most common venues for such litigation, but lawsuits are now being brought in major emerging markets in Asia-Pacific and Latin America, Verisk Maplecroft’s Climate Litigation Index shows. According to a Thursday report by climate think tank Carbon Tracker, the largest international oil and gas companies have all strengthened their climate policies in the last 12 months, “yet none have plans that give investors confidence their business is fully aligned with the Paris Agreement.” “To align with the Paris Agreement, companies must commit to absolute reductions in carbon emissions from their oil and gas products, with strong interim targets and a credible implementation plan,” said Mike Coffin, Carbon Tracker senior analyst and report author. Eni, Total, and BP have absolute reduction targets, with Eni having the strongest climate policies. U.S. firms ConocoPhillips, Chevron, and Exxon are the bottom three in the 10-strong list that Carbon Tracker reviewed. By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com
waldron
26/5/2021
17:40
Energy Dutch court rules oil giant Shell must cut carbon emissions by 45% by 2030 in landmark case Published Wed, May 26 20219:44 AM EDTUpdated 49 Min Ago Chloe Taylor @ChloeTaylor141 Key Points The landmark ruling comes at a time when the world’s largest corporate emitters are under immense pressure to set short, medium and long-term emissions targets that are consistent with the Paris Agreement. A spokesperson for Shell said the company “fully expect to appeal today’s disappointing court decision.”
gibbs1
25/5/2021
14:43
BLOOMBERG via Insurance Journal Impending Dutch Court Decision to Test Shell’s Responsibility for Climate Change By Hugo Miller and Laura Hurst | May 25, 2021 A Dutch court verdict against Royal Dutch Shell Plc will determine whether it has a legal responsibility for climate change, in a case that will be watched by Big Oil executives globally. A panel of judges in a lower court in The Hague will rule on Wednesday in a case being followed closely by Big Oil executives worldwide. While the verdict is only legally binding in the Netherlands, it’s being closely watched as a new area of litigation and may guide deliberations by judges elsewhere. Shell was sued by Milieudefensie, the Dutch arm of Friends of the Earth, whose lawyers spent two weeks in court earlier this year arguing that the company is violating human rights by extracting fossil fuels and undermining the Paris Agreement’s aim of limiting temperature increases to less than 1.5 degrees Celsius. Oil companies around the world have a so-called duty of care they must respect in the countries they operate to avoid oil spills and other non-deliberate acts of pollution. A verdict holding them liable for greenhouse gas emissions caused by the burning of fossil fuels they’ve extracted would be a landmark victory for environmental campaigners, who’ve increasingly turned to courts to seek reforms. At last count, there were close to 1,700 climate change cases targeting governments and companies, according to the climatecasechart.com database. “Without doubt, it’s a very important case,” said Eric De Brabandere, a professor of international dispute settlement at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands. “Not only because it directly targets such a big oil company but also indirectly attacks the whole oil extraction industry.” Shell acknowledges it has a role in dealing with climate change and says it’s doing so, but that it’s better achieved through cooperation rather than court action. “Addressing climate change is a huge, huge challenge and requires a collaborative and global approach,” Shell Legal Director Donny Ching said at the company’s annual meeting last week. “I don’t think litigation is going to help us.” 17,000 Plaintiffs Milieudefensie rounded up 17,000 people to sign on as co-plaintiffs in its complaint, which it says is the “first time a court has been asked to order a polluting transnational corporation to emit less CO₂ to save the climate.” “Judges around the world are being confronted by climate change cases and are looking to other judges for points of reference,” said Michael Burger, executive director of Columbia Law School’s Sabin Center for Climate Change Law. Recent decisions have not gone Shell’s way in both countries in which the Anglo-Dutch company is jointly listed. Thousands of Nigerians can sue Shell in London over environmental damage in the West African nation, the UK’s top court said in February. A month earlier, a Dutch court ordered Shell’s Nigerian unit to compensate locals for oil spills 13 years ago in a case that was also brought by Milieudefensie. New York City suffered a setback last month in its effort to make Shell, Exxon Mobil Corp., BP Plc and other energy companies help cover the public costs of dealing with climate change, as a federal appeals court ruled the global problem demands political rather than legal action. Holding a corporation liable for violating the Paris Agreement to which it’s not a signatory may not be compatible with international law. Although the case is being heard in The Hague, home to the International Court of Justice and International Criminal Court, it’s being held under Dutch law at a local court of first instance. “The test will be: to what extent does Shell have an obligation to reduce climate change, and that’s not a given,” De Brabandere said. “International law doesn’t really apply to companies, but to governments who then have a duty to apply it to companies.” A Dutch environmental group successfully sued the Dutch government in 2015, pushing it to cut greenhouse gas emissions. The Dutch Supreme Court upheld the decision in 2019, saying “the state is obliged to do ‘its part.'” The International Energy Agency last week put the focus back on energy companies, telling them to stop developing new oil, gas and coal fields today or face a dangerous rise in global temperatures. “The days of fossil fuel extraction are numbered and traditional oil exploration companies will have to switch to green alternatives quickly,” said Angus Walker, a partner at the London firm of BDB Pitmans. “Shell may need to read the writing on the wall and catch up, whether or not it wins this case.”
florenceorbis
25/5/2021
12:27
http://uk.advfn.com/cmn/fbb/thread.php3?id=9529095
florenceorbis
Chat Pages: 118  117  116  115  114  113  112  111  110  109  108  107  Older
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