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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Reneuron Group Plc LSE:RENE London Ordinary Share GB00BF5G6K95 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -2.50 -2.13% 115.00 113.00 117.00 117.50 115.00 117.50 70,852 16:18:25
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Pharmaceuticals & Biotechnology 6.1 -13.9 -35.9 - 65

Reneuron Share Discussion Threads

Showing 7901 to 7919 of 8350 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
13/4/2020
17:41
Cell therapy restores mobility and sensations in rodent models of stroke Scientists at Lund University in Sweden showed long ago they could reprogram human cells into nerve cells and implant them into the brains of rats after a stroke. But would the cells form the vital connections needed to restore mobility and sensations like touch? Now, they have early evidence that the answer to that question is yes. The Lund team turned skin cells into nerve cells, transplanted them into the brains of the rodent stroke models and observed them for six months. The new cells repaired the damage caused by strokes in the animals, the researchers reported in the journal PNAS. The Lund University team transplanted the reprogrammed skin cells into the rats’ cerebral cortices, the region of the brain that’s most commonly damaged by stroke. Then they used electron microscopy and other technologies to track the cells. That allowed them to see that the cells were making the connections needed to repair damaged nerve circuits. “We have been able to see that the fibers from the transplanted cells have grown to the other side of the brain, the side where we did not transplant any cells, and created connections,” said co-author Zaal Kokaia, professor of neurology at Lund, in a statement. Cell therapy has been proposed for treating stroke damage in the past, but efforts to make it a reality have hit some roadblocks. A stem cell therapy being developed by British biotech ReNeuron failed to hit its primary trial endpoint of improving arm and leg movements. ReNeuron has since turned in better results from a trial of its cell therapy for improving vision in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Meanwhile, academic researchers are testing a variety of other therapies aimed at repairing stroke damage. Last year, for example, Stanford researchers showed that blocking a particular microRNA prompted star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes to become neurons, which helped restore memory in rats. The Lund team is now planning additional animal trials to study how their transplanted cells affect memory and other intellectual functions, they said. They will also watch the rats closely to make sure they aren’t experiencing side effects, and they’ll study the impact of the transplants on regions of the brain. https://www.fiercebiotech.com/research/cell-therapy-restores-mobility-and-sensations-rodent-models-stroke Nuance on the 'failure': https://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/reneuron-stem-cell-test-helps-mobility-stroke-patients-but-missed-endpoint
supernumerary
09/4/2020
21:31
The downward trend was completed with the third wave, and surely we're now in the third wave of five for this upward trend. Get on board cos the third wave isn't finished yet and two more to come.
alimo
09/4/2020
09:41
RENE - really going for it these past few days. Another nice uptick today....lowest ask on show now 163p. f
fillipe
08/4/2020
13:12
Lol! That was years ago, bit risky, even for me. Got it on watch tho, more than I can say for Opti! I’m letting the share price speak for itself, both here and Opti.👉ӿ99;😂
rayrac
08/4/2020
13:09
could be worse bpc looooooooool raytard a disaster
manc10
08/4/2020
08:41
rene 3rd may 19 price 315p now 127p its done well raytard loooooool
manc10
07/4/2020
23:20
Better bet than Opti, that’s for sure! Manc is a waster from the Opti threads. Very nasty piece of work.
rayrac
07/4/2020
19:52
anybody seen raytard
manc10
07/4/2020
19:52
anybody seen raytard
manc10
07/4/2020
19:52
anybody seen raytard
manc10
07/4/2020
14:23
People waking up to potential here.
small crow
07/4/2020
09:04
And depends on reneurons definition of major. For us that would be one of the biggest but not sure that is the case
martinfrench
07/4/2020
09:02
Unusual RNs, when does the detail come out ? And was it rushed out for any reason ? Similar terms to last one, few mill up front to explore and then more down the line if adopted ?
martinfrench
07/4/2020
08:26
Certainly looks encouraging...
bonzo
07/4/2020
07:58
👍🏽
rayrac
07/4/2020
07:05
Good rns today, keep them coming
ayl30
03/4/2020
10:54
4/Jan/2019 ReNeuron Group plc (AIM: RENE), a UK-based global leader in the development of cell-based therapeutics, today announces that it has signed a collaboration agreement with a US-based biopharmaceutical company to explore the use of the Company's exosome technology platform as a potential delivery vehicle for synthetic oligonucleotides used in gene therapy. In the collaboration, ReNeuron will use its proprietary exosomes as well as sequence-based know-how and the US-based biopharmaceutical company will provide its expertise in the field of synthetic oligonucleotides to optimise their loading into exosomes. If the initial feasibility stage of the collaboration is successful, candidates with suitable pharmaceutical properties will be taken into the next part of the collaboration which will evaluate pre-clinical safety and potential efficacy. Commenting on the agreement, Olav Hellebø, Chief Executive Officer of ReNeuron, said: "Exosomes are biological nanoparticles ideally suited to the delivery of nucleic acid-based therapeutics due to their natural occurrence and abundance, their ability to protect their cargo from degradation and their potential for favourable bio-distribution. We are delighted to be collaborating with a biopharmaceutical company that has considerable experience in the development of novel oligonucleotide-based therapeutics." From Wikipedia Antisense oligonucleotides are single strands of DNA or RNA that are complementary to a chosen sequence.[4] In the case of antisense RNA they prevent protein translation of certain messenger RNA strands by binding to them, in a process called hybridization.[9] Antisense oligonucleotides can be used to target a specific, complementary (coding or non-coding) RNA. If binding takes place this hybrid can be degraded by the enzyme RNase H.[9] RNases H is an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA, and when used in an antisense oligonucleotide application results in 80-95% down-regulation of mRNA expression.[4] The use of morpholino-antisense oligonucleotides for gene knockdowns in vertebrates, which is now a standard technique in developmental biology and is used to study altered gene expression and gene function, was first developed by Janet Heasman using Xenopus. The antisense oligonucleotides have also been used to inhibit influenza virus replication in cell lines. AND Nucleic Acid-Mediated Cleavage of M1 Gene of Influenza A Virus Is Significantly Augmented by Antisense Molecules Targeted to Hybridize Close to the Cleavage Site Influenza A virus genome segment 7 encodes protein M1, which is the matrix protein playing crucial role in the virus life cycle. Any antiviral strategy that aims at reducing, in particular, the expression of this genome segment should, in principle, reduce the infectivity of the virus. We developed a specific antiviral approach at the molecular level and designed several novel 10–23 DNAzymes (Dz) and hammerhead ribozymes (Rz), specifically targeted to cleave at the conserved domains of the influenza virus M1 RNA. We sought to use antisense molecules with the hope that it will facilitate the ribozyme-mediated cleavage. We observed that the Mg2+-dependent sequence-specific cleavage of M1 RNA was achieved by both the Dz and Rz in a dose-dependent manner. This combination of catalytic Dz and Rz with antisense molecules, in principle, resulted in more effective gene suppression, inhibited the whole virus replication in host cell, and thus could be exploited for therapeutic purposes.
dickbush
03/4/2020
10:00
Nice to see a bit of life! RNS doesn't say much, but at least they're making progress, on several fronts, too. Exosomes are quite a hot area, hence my interest in the Evox deal, so Mr Adams really ought to get his finger out and line up big pharma. And what about Fosun again for China and the Far East? It would also be good if they were to release the unpublished data in a few weeks, just to keep the newsflow going. Doesn't need to be peer-reviewed, even a White Paper would ensure it got out.
supernumerary
03/4/2020
08:22
Dipped my toe in yestyerday.
tell sid
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