Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Purecircle Limited LSE:PURE London Ordinary Share BMG7300G1096 ORD USD0.10 (DI)
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 131.20 129.60 132.80 0.00 0.00 - 0.00 00:00:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Food Producers 99.2 5.7 3.8 34.2 242

Purecircle Share Discussion Threads

Showing 1001 to 1025 of 1450 messages
Chat Pages: Latest  46  45  44  43  42  41  40  39  38  37  36  35  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
29/5/2010
04:40
does anyone know how we get advfn to update the "financials" page? currently stuck at june 2008!
cnx
29/5/2010
04:38
does anyone know what percentage of the worldwide stevia (finshed product)market pure has?
cnx
27/5/2010
15:11
jailbird where is that from?.....................i think a ladies health and diet magazine. what it says is probably correct but not a enough warning on the badness of hfs. is stevia processing harmful? looks like a good question for the new stevia institute to answer (see ukreg above)
cnx
26/5/2010
23:13
Not sure if this applies to here If you feel you must have a sweetener, here are a few guidelines to follow: •Avoid ALL artificial sweeteners. •Avoid all conventional agave and high fructose corn syrup •If you have favorite products that you use PLEASE write the company and tell them to remove the fructose or you will not purchase them in the future. We have been VERY effective as many major companies have already shifted their practice of using HFCS. •Limit sugar of all types as much as possible. You can buy pure glucose (dextrose) as a sweetener for about $1 per pound, which has none of the adverse effects of fructose if used moderately. It is only 70 percent as sweet as sucrose, so you'll end up using a bit more of it for the same amount of sweetness, making it slightly more expensive than sucrose -- but still well worth it for your health. •Use high quality agave that has fructose in it's conjugated from. You can also use raw honey in moderation or avoid it completely as it is 70 percent fructose which is higher than HFCS. However the fructose is not in its free from so that moderates the damage. But each teaspoon of honey has nearly four grams of fructose so you will want to carefully add the total grams of fructose (including fruits) and keep them under 15 grams per day. •Use regular stevia in moderation, but avoid stevia-based sweeteners like Truvia and PureVia because they have undergone more processing. My favorites are the liquid stevias that are flavored with English Toffee or French Vanilla. Remember, in the US it is illegal to advertise stevia as a sweetener so you will need to look for it in the supplement section where it is legal to sell. •Lo Han is another excellent natural herbal sweetener. •Exercise can be a very powerful tool to help control fructose in a number of ways. If you are going to consume fructose it is BEST to do so immediately before, during or after INTENSE exercise as your body will tend to use it directly as fuel and not convert it to fat Additionally exercise will increase your insulin receptor sensitivity and help modulate the negative effects of fructose. Lastly exercise will also help to blunt your appetite and control your sweet tooth. If you have fasting insulin levels, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or if you're overweight, I suggest you avoid all sweeteners, including stevia, since any sweetener can decrease your insulin sensitivity.
jailbird
13/5/2010
15:50
Nice end to the day! share price seemed to be being pushed up without buys!?!
woodpeckers
09/5/2010
00:42
from todays suday times http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/health/article7120673.ece
cnx
05/5/2010
11:31
Starbucks using stevia. Over the past year, the brand has done their part to offer customers healthier options. It did away with all high-fructose corn syrup in Starbucks food, and for these new customizable Frapps, the company has opted to use strawberry sauce without HFCS to replace the previous syrup used in the Strawberries & Cream drink. Also, the Light Frappuccinos will all be made with natural sugar substitute Stevia and include water, a bit of real sugar, salt and natural flavors. Select syrups -- vanilla, hazelnut, caramel and cinnamon dolce -- will even be available as a sugar-free option. http://www.thatsfit.com/2010/05/04/however-you-want-it-frappuccino-a-better-treat/?icid=main|main|dl3|link4|http%3A%2F%2Fwww.thatsfit.com%2F2010%2F05%2F04%2Fhowever-you-want-it-frappuccino-a-better-treat%2F
sheeneqa
05/5/2010
09:58
Looks like good news to me. Strange going ons with PURE today.
spudders
30/4/2010
09:22
thanks,dcl5..good information
cnx
30/4/2010
07:26
PepsiCo explores natural sweetener from oats By Elaine Watson, 26-Apr-2010 Food Manufacture Patents filed by PepsiCo and Cargill reveal they are exploring new sources of natural sweeteners from oats and monatin, a naturally-occurring substance found in a plant grown in South Africa. A patent search conducted by Leatherhead Food Research (LFR) during research for its new report on the global intense sweeteners market, reveals that PepsiCo's Quaker Oats division has developed a method of modifying oats using enzymes in order to derive a potent natural sweetener. The application shows that Quaker has developed a method of producing a natural sweetener from oats that is "sufficiently sweet to allow it to be used as a supplement or replacement for sweeteners such as sucrose or sucrose substitutes, which are conventionally added to grain-based food products". According to the patent application, published last year, Quaker is exploring a number of potential applications: "It is contemplated that the naturally-derived self-sweetened compositions ... can be used in a number of food products and beverages. "For example, it is contemplated that the natural sweeteners can be used in oatmeal and other ready-to-eat cereals, beverages and puddings." The method outlined in the application involves hydrolysing oats with an enzyme to obtain modified flour and then drying the flour to obtain a sweetener composition. Suitable raw materials include whole oat groats, oat flour, rolled oats, partially milled oats and oatmeal. Cargill explores new sweetener Ingredients giant Cargill, meanwhile, has also filed an application to patent a novel sweetener comprising specific stereoisomers of monatin, a naturally occurring, high-intensity sweetener suitable for use in tabletop sweeteners as well as food and drink products. Unlike some other intense sweeteners, monatin has no bitter metallic, acidic or astringent aftertaste, claims Cargill. It is also more stable than aspartame, has a cleaner taste than saccharin, is sweeter than sucralose and does not have the 'liquorice' aftertaste sometimes associated with stevia-based sweeteners, adds the firm. "Monatin is a naturally-occurring, high intensity sweetener isolated from the plant Sclerochiton ilicifolius, found in the Transvaal Region of South Africa. Monatin contains no carbohydrate or sugar, and nearly no calories, unlike sucrose or other nutritive sweeteners at equal sweetness." It adds: "Different stereoisomers of monatin, including the R,R and S,S stereoisomers, have potential in the sweetener industry, either as separate ingredients or in blends. Monatin, and blends of stereoisomers of monatin with other sweeteners, are thought to have superior taste characteristics and/or physical qualities, as compared to other high intensity sweeteners. "Because of its intense sweetness, the R,R stereoisomer in particular should be economically competitive compared to other high intensity sweeteners." Sucralose prices drop by two-thirds The Leatherhead report, covered in detail by our sister publication FoodNavigator-USA.com, predicts strong growth for stevia-based natural sweeteners as regulatory approvals start to come through. It also reveals that the market price for sucralose has fallen from almost $350/kg in 2005 to just $100/kg today, with further price drops predicted as the market becomes more crowded. By value, aspartame is the clear market leader with an estimated 44% of the global intense sweeteners market, ahead of sucralose (with 17% of the market), stevia (14%), acesulfame K (10%) and cyclamate (9%). On a geographical basis, the US accounts for 58% of the market by value, compared with 22% for Europe and 19% for Asia-Pacific region, says LFR. "In 2009, the global market for intense sweeteners amounted to more than $1.49bn. Market value has risen by an estimated 21.3% compared with levels in 2007, mainly as a result of the rapid increase in demand for newer varieties of intense sweetener, most notably stevia."
dcl5
30/4/2010
07:20
Tesco and Sainsbury plan own-label sucralose launches By Elaine Watson, 27-Apr-2010 Food Manufacture Tesco, Sainsbury and Morrisons all aim to launch own-label sucralose-based sweeteners this year to compete with Tate & Lyle's Splenda product, FoodManufacture.co.uk has learned. Dutch firm Prinsen, which recently struck a deal with Bangalore-based BioPlus Life Sciences to distribute Bioplus's sucralose in Western Europe, is in talks with all the leading UK supermarkets about supplying sucralose for own-label table-top sweeteners in tablet or granular form. Prinsen's UK md Peter Tattersall said: "Asda was first with a private-label sucralose sweetener, which it is sourcing from Germany. But Tesco, Sainsbury and Morrisons are now looking at own-label as well, so we are talking to all of them. We've got a quote out with Tesco and Sainsbury is doing a tender. "We're also talking to Boots and Waitrose, which are looking at launching a branded sucralose sweetener." He added: "Many of our customers need the supply assurance that comes with a legitimate second source of sucralose [an alternative to market leader Tate & Lyle] and we are pleased to help meet this need." Safe and legal BioPlus manufactures sucralose using a process it claims does not infringe any of Tate & Lyle's patents and is itself supported by a suite of patents "filed in all key markets including the US and Canada". It added: "The availability of a new, reliable, high-quality source of sucralose will eliminate the quality and legal risks associated with sourcing and using sucralose marketed by suppliers other than Tate & Lyle." Companies buying sucralose from 'non-patented' suppliers were taking a significant risk, claimed Bioplus: "Significant quality issues exist for users of non-patented suppliers of sucralose, related to product quality and specifications, total purity, non-sucralose contaminants and production site traceability. "Furthermore, in addition to the potential risk of intellectual property (IP) indemnification, there is the prospect of future patent and IP infringement issues when 30 BioPlus patent applications are issued over the next 12-24 months." Tate & Lyle: lower average selling prices Market leader Tate & Lyle, which has mothballed its Alabama plant and concentrated sucralose production at Singapore following a "scientific breakthrough " that increased yields by 25%, said sucralose "continued to deliver volume growth at lower average selling prices" in the year to March 31, 2010. However, analysts predict it will not be able to sustain its profit margins on sucralose for long as Indian firms such as Bioplus and Chinese firms such as JK Sucralose and Niutang increase capacity. However, Irish firm Fusion Nutraceuticals, which sources its sucralose from Indian pharmaceutical firm Alkem, has not made significant progress since launching on the European market in 2008. The firm, which Tate & Lyle claimed was using outdated "first-generation technology", is not returning telephone calls. Sucralose is used in several thousand food and beverage products across the globe, from infant formula to diet soft drinks, confectionery, dairy products, baked goods and flavoured waters.
dcl5
21/4/2010
15:46
Hang in there, whatever you do. This is the time to buy this share not to sell, up to 330p - 400p minimum, short term, as per equitydevelopment.co.uk, earlier report, in February this year.
a1samu
20/4/2010
09:01
this report has been reproduced in the current edition of "nexus". it makes no mention of stevia but points out the health hazards of "high fructose syrup" and "agave extract". i worked with HFS,many years ago in thailand, and made hfs from casava roots. the article is long but gives good background into stevia competitor products http://www.westonaprice.org/Agave-Nectar-Worse-Than-We-Thought.html
cnx
19/4/2010
23:40
duplicated in error - apologies
scrutable
19/4/2010
23:40
Can anyone post the Daily Mail passage? Which came first? Equity Development today, also put out a 19pp research report on PURE. i don't believe in coincidences. I warrant that the Daily Mail got an advance copy. Equity are quite open about circulating their reports. I believe that one can just register to get a copy. I did, some two years ago and get all their reports automatically. Strongly recommended
scrutable
19/4/2010
21:35
http://www.equitydevelopment.co.uk/downloader/717 S
smarm
19/4/2010
18:35
Tipped in Trendwatch last Thursday. Very positive :)
spudders
19/4/2010
08:39
Out of these for now, hope I get the opportunity to buy back a bit lower....
sheeneqa
18/4/2010
15:18
Tipped as a buy in the Mail on Sunday.
cestnous
14/4/2010
19:20
EFSA (European Food Safety Association) has issued a positive scientific opinion on the use of Stevia as a sweetener. Should help the share price tomorrow.
troc1958
13/4/2010
18:00
a few p a day will suit me
haroldthegreat
07/4/2010
07:22
Nice RNS yesterday - good evidence that many new stevia products are coming on line before the Q3 window that I was personally expecting. share price seems to have responded too. Hopefully we can break into a new trading range with support at 250.
woodpecker25
18/3/2010
17:42
If you take note of the rapid increase in serious obesity,and observe what a disgraceful proportion of the population are crippled by this self -infliction, you might come to believe that the substitution of stevia for sugar in commercial products is one of the most important contributions ever to be made to general health and the consequent quality of life. IMO it is arguable that the damage done by excessive sugar rivals that done by nicotine and alcohol. From the investment point of view it is relevant that compared with the withdrawal symptons from the latter, few consumers will show resistance to the introduction of stevia. The take up should be universal, and explosive - once the Authorities wake up to the potential reduction in the cost of health and set about distributing the facts.
scrutable
15/3/2010
14:20
Ding dang do for me aswell htg :)
spudders
15/3/2010
14:18
1p a day is fine!
haroldthegreat
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