Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Morrison (wm) Supermarkets Plc LSE:MRW London Ordinary Share GB0006043169 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -1.25 -0.63% 196.80 196.75 196.85 199.55 196.45 197.40 4,766,901 15:32:46
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Food & Drug Retailers 17,735.0 320.0 10.3 19.0 4,708

Morrison (wm) Supermarkets Share Discussion Threads

Showing 10126 to 10150 of 10375 messages
Chat Pages: 415  414  413  412  411  410  409  408  407  406  405  404  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
14/3/2019
10:25
Which on-line supermarket was cheapest in February 2019? At nearly £9 cheaper than its next cheapest rival for a basket of branded groceries, our pricing comparison shows that Sainsbury’s was the best supermarket for value in February 2019. A basket of 69 popular items cost an average of £131.73. Morrisons and Asda took second and third place, with a basket of the same branded groceries at each costing £140.51 and £143.50 respectively. Buying the basket of identical items at online-only Ocado cost a whopping £24.07 more than Sainsbury’s in February, running up a bill of £155.80. Waitrose was the second-most expensive for our selection of groceries, which would have cost £154.36. How cheap is Tesco? Tesco is the UK’s largest retailer, and always used to be considered good value against its rivals. In our latest supermarket survey though, it was awarded just two stars for value for money by Which? members. In our annual price analysis to find out which supermarket was the cheapest in 2018, Tesco came in fourth behind Morrisons, Asda and Sainsbury’s. It continued to be in fourth place in terms of cost in January, and is fourth again in February with a basket cost of £149.73. Towards the end of 2018, Tesco renewed its focus on value for money. It started to promote the ‘Exclusively at Tesco’ range with an emphasis on a low price basket of shopping, designed to compete with Aldi and Lidl. In another move to compete with the German discounters, it launched its own discount store, Jacks. Keep up with our monthly basket analysis to see if these moves start to pay off.
loganair
13/3/2019
15:12
hTTps://www.ft.com/content/8c81fb7e-44de-11e9-b168-96a37d002cd3 Sains/Asda merger comment. "Mr Potts said that while he and others in the industry were awaiting the final verdict on the combination with interest, “our turnround isn’t predicated on anyone else’s deal”." Brexit: “We are blessed that two-thirds of what we sell is produced in the UK, and 100 per cent of our beef, pork and fresh poultry is British.” “We’ve looked for alternative routes into the country, we have taken authorised economic operator status, which is a way to be slightly speedier unloading in some checks, and we have brought forward purchases of some goods..." Analysts said the results were solid and that investors were increasingly focusing on the company’s cash generation. “At yesterday’s share price, this is a 5.6 per cent dividend yield for a company with almost no leverage, solid execution and more earnings and free cash flow growth to come,” said Bruno Monteyne at Bernstein.  James Grzinic at Jefferies said Morrisons’ high proportion of freehold stores meant that as new accounting standards were applied its cash flow generation would become more evident.
scotches
13/3/2019
12:16
So maybe neutral for mrw
games
13/3/2019
12:16
“With Brexit still looming over the retail sector in 2019, talks of supply shortages and impending lack of availability across UK grocery are rife. But Morrisons is better placed to withstand such pressures than its Big Four rivals, having successfully secured Authorised Economic Operator status during the year, on top on expanding its dependence on local suppliers (up 27% during 2018, and doubled over the past three years); in fact, in light of this significantly stronger foothold, it would be understandable if some of its management secretly have their fingers crossed for a no-deal situation. hxxp://www.retailtimes.co.uk/morrisons-equipped-to-outperform-in-2019-after-a-third-successive-year-of-strong-growth-says-globaldata/
games
13/3/2019
09:40
Eu import tarrifs affecting supermarkets in the event of wto. Imo.
games
13/3/2019
09:21
Don’t understand the market reaction. Results are great.
saltaire111
13/3/2019
08:01
Good Start !
chinese investor
13/3/2019
07:53
Wow! Not a holder. Just seen this. Looks good at first look
sweep stock
13/3/2019
07:21
Superb results. Ahead of expectations. Special Divi 4p. Nice. Salty
saltaire111
13/3/2019
07:06
Full-year total dividend up 24.9% to 12.60p (2017/18: 10.09p) !
chinese investor
12/3/2019
17:51
Tempted to buy a few before results but held off, will have a look tomorrow.
essentialinvestor
12/3/2019
13:40
Can Morrisons pick up a trolley full of new investors following Wednesday’s full year results? January’s post-Christmas update did little for the stock. While for the 9 weeks to 6th January group like-for-like sales rose 3.6%, the Retail contribution was just 0.6%, the rest coming from Amazon-supplying Wholesale division.This as number of transactions actually fell 0.9% due to what Morrisons dubbed a ‘change in consumer behaviour’, i.e. the continued rise of Aldi and Lidl and some Brexit-inspired cautiousness from shoppers. Investors are going to want to know whether that ‘change in consumer behaviour’ continued throughout the rest of the fourth quarter, and whether it has carried over into Morrisons’ financial 2019/20... Read what Spreadex analysts have to say, or watch a 60 second earnings preview video, here: https://spreadex.com/?tid=388213
connorcampbell
12/3/2019
13:39
Can Morrisons pick up a trolley full of new investors following Wednesday’s full year results? January’s post-Christmas update did little for the stock. While for the 9 weeks to 6th January group like-for-like sales rose 3.6%, the Retail contribution was just 0.6%, the rest coming from Amazon-supplying Wholesale division.This as number of transactions actually fell 0.9% due to what Morrisons dubbed a ‘change in consumer behaviour’, i.e. the continued rise of Aldi and Lidl and some Brexit-inspired cautiousness from shoppers. Investors are going to want to know whether that ‘change in consumer behaviour’ continued throughout the rest of the fourth quarter, and whether it has carried over into Morrisons’ financial 2019/20... Read what Spreadex analysts have to say, or watch a 60 second earnings preview video, here: hxxps://spreadex.com/?tid=388213
connorcampbell
12/3/2019
13:39
Can Morrisons pick up a trolley full of new investors following Wednesday’s full year results? January’s post-Christmas update did little for the stock. While for the 9 weeks to 6th January group like-for-like sales rose 3.6%, the Retail contribution was just 0.6%, the rest coming from Amazon-supplying Wholesale division.This as number of transactions actually fell 0.9% due to what Morrisons dubbed a ‘change in consumer behaviour’, i.e. the continued rise of Aldi and Lidl and some Brexit-inspired cautiousness from shoppers. Investors are going to want to know whether that ‘change in consumer behaviour’ continued throughout the rest of the fourth quarter, and whether it has carried over into Morrisons’ financial 2019/20... Read what Spreadex analysts have to say, or watch a 60 second earnings preview video, here: hxxps://spreadex.com/?tid=388213
connorcampbell
01/3/2019
09:40
The national convenience retailer McColl's will convert 10 of its stores to the Morrisons Daily fascia. The first of these stores, located in Bolton, will re-open in late April after a 10-day refit. In line with other stores now being franchised under the Morrisons Daily fascia by the likes of Rontec, these 10 McColl's stores will be supplied with Morrisons private label lines rather than the Safeway products that feature in the McColl's badged stores. With Morrisons now acting as the wholesale supplier to 1,300 stores in McColl's wider estate, the opportunity for McColl's draw on the Morrisons brand credibility is clearly one way to further enhance its progress towards repositioning its stores with a fully-fledged grocery convenience offer. For Morrisons the opportunity is to further extend its brand in a market sector where currently it has a limited presence.
loganair
24/2/2019
20:04
If I was in Sainburys CEO Coupes shoes I would be having a long chat with Morrison seeing if Morrison would like half of Asda stores while Sainburys have the other half with both supermarkets giving Walmart a 30% stake in their own companies in return. As I posted before this would only increase Sainsburys market share to around 23% while for Morrison to somewhere around 18%. Over the next 5 years both Sainsbury's and Morrison will each lose around 1% of this market share with Aldi gaining around 2 1/2% giving them a market share of a little over 10%. If this was to happen, then in 5 years time I could see the market shares being around the follwing: Tesco - 27% Sains - 22% Morri - 17% Aldi - 10% Lidl - 06.5% Coop - 05.5%
loganair
24/2/2019
11:14
Asda would be an affordable to a private equity firm, if large, bite for a financial sponsor. In the absence of another bidder, the valuation might fall to, say, 6 billion pounds. Then assume that half the deal could be funded in debt. If Walmart kept a minority stake, the equity the buyout firm would need to put up could be as little as 1.5 billion pounds. This could prove tempting – if a buyout firm could satisfy itself that getting out of the investment would be as easy as getting in. With antitrust regulators likely to block a sale to another grocer, the exit would have to be through an initial public offering. To generate an internal rate of return of roughly 15 percent over five years would require the buyout firm to grow the equity value to 6 billion pounds. Assume debt stayed steady as spare cash was reinvested in the business (it needs it). Asda would then have to attain an enterprise value of 9 billion pounds to deliver the desired gains. Asda's margins are already wide. So the strategy would have to focus on getting sales up. CEO Roger Burnley has delivered the beginnings of a turnaround, growing sales by 2.6 percent in 2017. That would need to be sustained over the lifetime of the investment. The company would need to poach customers from big grocers Sainsbury and Tesco Plc, most likely by undercutting them on price, and from discounters Aldi and Lidl by convincing them to pay a little more for the convenience of a full range. Sure, it would still be tough to get an Asda deal past any private equity firm’s investment committee. But a buyout wouldn’t be Walmart’s only option. It could combine Asda with another retailer, such as B&M European Value Retail SA – both serve the same price-conscious shoppers. So at least Walmart has options. That isn’t the case with Sainsbury. CEO Mike Coupe could try to strike a deal with Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc instead of Asda – but that could face similar regulatory constraints. Or he could stick with a standalone strategy. But that won't generate anything like the value promised by the Asda tie-up. What’s more, the company’s performance has recently deteriorated. A private equity bid for the supermarket might be possible, but it would be less than straightforward. With the Asda deal falling apart at the checkout, Sainsbury will be left with the advice of one of its own marketing slogans: love your leftovers. Personal note - If Sainsburys tried to join with Morrison I do not think they would have the same difficulty as with the Asda deal as any tie up with Morrison would give the combined group around 1.5% less market share then Tesco currently have. It seems to me Morrison really needs to do something as in 5 years Aldi will have a greater market share then Morrison will have.
loganair
24/2/2019
10:25
If Walmart really wish to get the best price for Asda I think their best option would be to sell 50% of the Asda stores to Sainsburys giving them 23% market share and the other 50% to Morrison increasing Morrisons market share to around 17% in return for a 25% stake in both Sainburys and Morrisons. I'm unable to see how the CMA could turn this down and let it go through as is.
loganair
24/2/2019
08:18
Good news !
chinese investor
23/2/2019
22:49
American private equity giant KKR is plotting a bid for Walmart’s Asda as talks for its merger with British rival Sainsbury falter on competition concerns, The Sunday Times reported. KKR is thought to be working with former Asda boss Tony De Nunzio, now a senior adviser to the buyout firm, the report said. The newspaper, which did not cite its sources, said Asda would have a lower valuation than the 7.3 billion pounds in the Sainsbury’s deal because there would not be the same economies of scale. The report cited a source close to Walmart. A spokesperson for Asda could not immediately be reached for comment.
loganair
21/2/2019
14:17
They would not be allowed TSCO, their firepower plus the market leader, no way.
essentialinvestor
20/2/2019
14:09
Essentialinvestor.......why not buyout tesco,go for the biggest.
albert3591
20/2/2019
13:31
That would be interesting. I'm in no doubt that Amazon will make a big move in UK food retail, it's the form that takes is the unknown.
essentialinvestor
20/2/2019
12:44
I understand if the merger doesn't go through Walmart's prefered option is to list Asda on the LSE.
loganair
20/2/2019
12:19
Could ASDA be sold to Amazon? - if the case it might be a huge blow to MRW.
essentialinvestor
Chat Pages: 415  414  413  412  411  410  409  408  407  406  405  404  Older
Your Recent History
LSE
MRW
Morrison (..
Register now to watch these stocks streaming on the ADVFN Monitor.

Monitor lets you view up to 110 of your favourite stocks at once and is completely free to use.

By accessing the services available at ADVFN you are agreeing to be bound by ADVFN's Terms & Conditions

P: V: D:20191112 15:47:51