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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Micro Focus International Plc LSE:MCRO London Ordinary Share GB00BJ1F4N75 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -51.40p -2.52% 1,988.60p 1,989.00p 1,989.80p 2,045.50p 1,985.20p 2,033.00p 886,903 16:35:06
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Software & Computer Services 3,722.8 26.7 157.9 12.4 6,826.95

Micro Focus Share Discussion Threads

Showing 5201 to 5225 of 5225 messages
Chat Pages: 209  208  207  206  205  204  203  202  201  200  199  198  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
14/6/2019
09:48
But will there also be a dividend ?
flatoutfred
29/5/2019
18:22
Looks like the sector is down. I have another one that's in the same sector and closed by around the same percentage down.
highlands
29/5/2019
15:03
I am not a holder yet but have noticed that Micro often features in the Top Riser list only to be followed very shortly by featuring in the Top Faller list. An unusual pattern, but maybe a good shre to trade?? Currently 4.7% down in today's session. Any thoughts?
shaker44
28/5/2019
15:47
I bought some new shares after I received the capital repayment and bought the met 1785 I think that in future if they do this again which they've done in the past few times I will actually sell before the capital redemption and then buy back in when the price is lower of course it depends on circumstances the value at the time but I think that's the best way have to say I'm not keen on this capital repayment scheme I'm sure if lost a lot of fun manages etc it works from a tax point of view eccetera
mrthomas
26/5/2019
17:38
Thank you for your explanation, However, this is what I had in My account. I am in profit now, but the platform I'm with they have no idea. They thought it was a divi payment.! ;-)
umitw
25/5/2019
17:28
umitw I don't know how many Existing Ordinary Shares you had or what they cost you to buy but that doesn't sound right. Let's assume you had 1000 Existing Ordinary Shares and that they cost you £15,000. You would get 1000 B Shares that were redeemed for 335.859391 pence each and following application of the Consolidation Factor (0.8296) you would have 829 New Ordinary Shares and 0.6 of a Fractional Entitlement. The Redemption of the B Shares is treated as a Capital Disposal for UK investors and the original base cost of the Existing Ordinary Shares is allocated between the B Shares and the New Ordinary Shares in proportion to their relative value on 30 April 2019, the first day of trading of the New Ordinary Shares The B shares are worth 335.859391 pence each and the New Ordinary Shares are valued on the closing MMQ on 30 April of 1937.8 pence. Value of B shares 1000x£3.35859391 = £3,358.59 and the Value of the New Ordinary Shares is 829x£19.378=£16,064.36 and the aggregate value on 30 April would be £19,422.95. Assuming your 1000 Existing Ordinary Shares cost £15,000. This cost gets allocated to the B shares (3,358.59/19,422.95)x£15,000=£2,593.78 And the New Ordinary Shares would be (16,064.36/19,422.95)x£15,000=£12,406.22 If not held in an ISA or SIPP, for UK tax payers the B Share Scheme is a Capital Disposal so based on these numbers Proceeds. £3,358.59 Base cost. (£2,593.78) Capital gain. £764.81
philms
21/5/2019
12:43
I don't seem to have made any profit from the sale of my shares. They took enough shares to sell and deposit the money to my account. Only now the share price has risen so I'm in profit.How does this work out? -:)
umitw
21/5/2019
10:34
Ok, thanks Philms... Makes sense. I was wondering why my accountants thought I was correct (since the're useless)! Lol.
sogoesit
19/5/2019
21:29
Section 104 applies to holdings of the same class of share. The New Ordinary Shares and the B Shares are different classes of shares so 104 doesn't apply. You allocate the capital gains base cost of your existing ordinary shares (those listed before 30 April) between the New Ordinary Shares listed on 30 April and the B shares issued on 29 April. The redemption of the B shares is a disposal of those shares and will give rise to a capital gain or capital loss.
philms
19/5/2019
01:50
I have never declared returns of value as income. ("Never" meaning applied to several stocks over the last decade or so). The RoV gets rolled-up (consolidation reduces number of shares and the return ("income") reduces the base cost of acquisition) in a Section 104 holding. Come any disposal the Section 104 calculation applies for CGT. My accountant agrees. This is what applies, as quoted from Post 5202: ". the issue of the B Shares to Shareholders and the Share Capital Consolidation should in practice each be treated as a reorganisation of the Company’s share capital. Shareholders in receipt of B Shares and New Ordinary Shares arising from the B Share Scheme should not be treated as making a disposal of their holding of Existing Ordinary Shares and no liability to CGT should arise, in each case by reason of the issue of the B Shares to Shareholders or the Share Capital Consolidation. Instead, the Shareholder’s resultant holding of B Shares and New Ordinary Shares should, for CGT purposes, be treated as the same asset and as having been acquired at the same time, and for the same consideration, as the Shareholder’s holding of Existing Ordinary Shares; • upon a subsequent disposal (or deemed disposal) of all or part of the Shareholder’s B Shares or New Ordinary Shares, a Shareholder’s aggregate CGT base cost in such Shareholder’s holding of Existing Ordinary Shares should be apportioned between the B Shares and the New Ordinary Shares by reference to their respective values on the first day on which the New Ordinary Shares are listed;"
sogoesit
17/5/2019
17:46
For UK taxpayers the redemption of the B shares is treated as a disposal of those shares and may give rise to a capital gain or loss.Extract from the CircularThe material set out in paragraph A below does not constitute tax advice. Shareholders who are in any doubt as to their tax position or who are subject to tax in a jurisdiction other than the United Kingdom should consult an appropriate independent professional tax adviser.1. CAPITAL REORGANISATIONFor the purposes of CGT:• the issue of the B Shares to Shareholders and the Share Capital Consolidation should in practice each be treated as a reorganisation of the Company's share capital. Shareholders in receipt of B Shares and New Ordinary Shares arising from the B Share Scheme should not be treated as making a disposal of their holding of Existing Ordinary Shares and no liability to CGT should arise, in each case by reason of the issue of the B Shares to Shareholders or the Share Capital Consolidation. Instead, the Shareholder's resultant holding of B Shares and New Ordinary Shares should, for CGT purposes, be treated as the same asset and as having been acquired at the same time, and for the same consideration, as the Shareholder's holding of Existing Ordinary Shares;• upon a subsequent disposal (or deemed disposal) of all or part of the Shareholder's B Shares or New Ordinary Shares, a Shareholder's aggregate CGT base cost in such Shareholder's holding of Existing Ordinary Shares should be apportioned between the B Shares and the New Ordinary Shares by reference to their respective values on the first day on which the New Ordinary Shares are listed; and39• the sale, on behalf of relevant Shareholders, of fractional entitlements to New Ordinary Shares resulting from the Share Capital Consolidation (where applicable) should not generally in practice constitute a part disposal for CGT purposes. Instead, the amount of any payment received by the Shareholder will be deducted from the base cost of the New Ordinary Shares for the purposes of computing a chargeable gain or allowable loss on a subsequent disposal. This treatment will not apply if the proceeds are greater than the base cost of the holding of Existing Ordinary Shares. In this event, the Shareholder may elect (in effect) for the excess to be treated as a capital gain and to give up any basis they have in their shares.The issue of the B Shares and the Share Capital Consolidation should not give rise to any liability to United Kingdom income tax (or corporation tax on income) in a Shareholder's hands.2. REDEMPTION OF B SHARESThe redemption of the B Shares should be treated as a disposal of those Shares for United Kingdom tax purposes. This may, subject to the Shareholder's individual circumstances and any available exemption or relief, give rise to a chargeable gain (or allowable loss) for the purposes of CGT.Any gain or loss will be calculated by reference to the difference between the purchase or redemption price and the element of the Shareholder's original base cost in their Existing Ordinary Shares that is attributed to the relevant B Shares. The amount of the base cost which will be attributed to the B Shares will be determined as outlined in Section (A)(1) above.2.1 IndividualsThe amount of CGT, if any, payable by an individual Shareholder as a consequence of the redemption of the B Shares will depend on his or her own personal tax position. Broadly, a Shareholder whose total taxable gains and income in a given year, including any gains made on the redemption of the B Shares and after all allowable deductions "Total Taxable Gains and Income"), are less than or equal to the upper limit of the income tax basic rate band applicable in respect of that tax year (the "Band Limit") (£34,500 for 2018/2019 and £37,500 for 2019/2020) will normally be subject to CGT at a rate of 10 per cent. in respect of any gain arising on the redemption of his B Shares. To the extent that a Shareholder's Total Taxable Gains and Income exceed the Band Limit, capital gains tax will generally be charged at 20 per cent. in respect of the portion of the gain that exceeds the Band Limit.The capital gains tax annual exemption for individuals (which is £11,700 in the 2018/2019 tax year and £12,000 in the 2019/2020 tax year) may be available to exempt any chargeable gain, to the extent that the exemption has not already been utilised.Full Circular available here:-https://investors.microfocus.com/umbraco/Surface/Disclaimer/Accept
philms
17/5/2019
17:07
A didvidend is a return of value. Hence the ROV is just a big dividend as far as HMRC is concerned and they're right so you have to declare it and pay tax on it if not in an ISA.
ilovefrogs
17/5/2019
09:52
uganda I said it reduces your base cost
phillis
17/5/2019
09:32
Anyone know what the current divi forecast is based on revised number of shares?
woodhawk
17/5/2019
09:02
For shares outside SIPP or ISA there could be a capital gain or loss depending on your base cost. Base cost is allocated on the basis of relative value of New Ordinary Shares and B Shares on 30 April, first day of trading of New Ordinary Shares.
philms
16/5/2019
17:16
Thx for the advice, no tax implication for me - all ISA or SIPP. IG listed my ROC as a 'dividend' though.
woodhawk
16/5/2019
16:54
No your cost should reduce by the same amount as the cash you receive so you havea nil capital gain
ugandalad
16/5/2019
16:31
but presumably affects your base cost for capital gains purposes
phillis
16/5/2019
15:58
Previous post said; Basically yes but it’s not a dividend since it’s not liable to income tax. It’s a Return of Capital. It’s like you exchanging some of your shares with the company for cash. You have cash in return for having less shares. It’s a wash. If you’ve been in MCRO they’ve done it before; it’s a distribution of capital. Make sure you DO NOT declare it as income on your tax return! However I note my broker has listed the payment as a dividend!
higgins1
16/5/2019
08:12
What are the tax implications of the ROV in the UK? Luckily, all mine are ISA'd and SIPP'd so not relevant in my particular case, but still interested?
woodhawk
16/5/2019
07:57
At first I did not think that the Return of Value would be a net positive action, now the dust has settled I have tried to anyalise the situation! 03/04/19 3180 shares @ 20.67 [closing price day before last regular div] = £65730.60 29/04/19 3180 shares @ 19.205 [closing price day before ROV] = £61071.90 30/04/19 2638 shares @ 19.378 [closing price day of ROV] = £51119.16 14/05/19 ROV payment 10562.78 15/05/19 2638 shares @ 18.284 = £48233.19 Add back in ROV 10562.78 + 48233.19 = 58795.97 Worse off than at either 03/04 or 29/04 To be seen what tax advantages there are from ROV share wash compared to straight sell? [I do not live in UK] If I understand correctly there should now be less shares in circulation which should equate to higher share price in the future, against loss of income from disposal of the SUSE business. ??? Only time will tell!
higgins1
16/5/2019
07:21
Can someone please explain....for many years when issuing a trading update Micro Focus includes phrases such as - "Management continues to guide to a constant currency revenue range in respect of its continuing operations, for the full year to 31 October 2019, of minus 4% to minus 6%, compared to the 12 months ended 31 October 2018." What does the minus bit refer to?
soundsplausible
14/5/2019
15:30
So the former Autonomy cfo got 5 years
phillis
14/5/2019
12:10
Got mine yesterday (interactive investor)
uncle andy
14/5/2019
10:34
Hargreaves Landsdown say should be credited to my account today, fingers crossed
malcolm caton
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