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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Merchants Trust Plc LSE:MRCH London Ordinary Share GB0005800072 ORD 25P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  5.00 0.92% 551.00 547.00 550.00 550.00 545.00 547.00 158,026 16:35:27
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 24.9 21.9 18.5 29.8 686

Merchants Share Discussion Threads

Showing 2051 to 2075 of 2175 messages
Chat Pages: 87  86  85  84  83  82  81  80  79  78  77  76  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
13/8/2021
15:39
the next generation of dividend hero's maybe. as u can see HFEL is bottom of the table, where will it be by the end of the year ?
ctrader3
13/8/2021
15:34
best performing TR dividend hero for this year to date, congrats to the management.
ctrader3
13/8/2021
14:51
now using 10k, just because it's easy and ignoring trading costs and u sell next week at 550p u have received a dividend as a Brucie bonus, which I'll also ignore, which more than covers any costs. we know the dividend is £775.00 pa. if u now take your £15,713 and re-invest in HFEL yielding 7.5% your dividend for the next year would be £1,178.00. HFEL reported the dividend was covered without using any reserves. whilst u are unlikely to do so, even maybe splitting the cash into 2 yielding shares, u would sit back, bank the dividends and wait for Mr. Market to let u do it all over again, because at times Mr. Market is not that bright.
ctrader3
13/8/2021
14:38
You don’t need to be clever to spot that opportunity.
escapetohome
13/8/2021
14:37
I did buy at that price. Comment at the time dissing ‘value’ shares and MRch performance was wide of the mark. Clearly unable to appreciate contrarian view.
escapetohome
13/8/2021
14:11
if u were clever, lucky, fortunate to buy here at 350p, everyone had the opportunity. (my lowest price was 362p.) the current dividend is 27.2p a yield on the buying price of 350p = 7.75%. this yield will gradually increase until a. u sell the shares b. MRCH amend their dividend policy. c. inflation hits the market and then the dividend should rise more quickly. get rich slow.
ctrader3
13/8/2021
09:40
there's an interesting new breed of IT's who pin next year's dividend percentage to the end of year NAV. Some will pay from capital as well as dividends received, the big advantage u don't have to incur the costs of selling any shares and your holding remains the same.
ctrader3
13/8/2021
09:36
04/08/2021 14:04:19 ▼ European Assets Trust PLC - Netherlands-based trust that invests in European quoted small and medium-sized companies - Reports a net asset value total return of 13% in the half-year ended June 30, slightly ahead of the EMIX Smaller European Companies benchmark return of 11%. Sees NAV per share reach 146.19 pence on June 30, up 35% year-on-year from 108.47p and 10% higher than the 132.75p reported at the end of 2020. Declares first and second interim dividends for the period totalling 4.00p, up 14% from 3.51p a year prior. Announces total dividends of 8.00p to be issued in 2021, also 14% higher than the 7.02p issued in 2020. Chair Jack Perry says: "The majority of the first half of the year has been characterised by optimism of an economic and social recovery following the widespread vaccination programmes...Though the authorities are clear that they believe any inflationary spike will be transitory, the debate is likely to dominate market commentary into the second half...We are fortunate that our stock research is conducted in a large diverse region of opportunities. It allows us to uncover high quality niche opportunities at attractive prices, and this is what will drive our long-term returns." Current stock price: 144.00p, up 0.5% on Wednesday Year-to-date change: up 20% Dividends One consequence of the pandemic has been a reduction in the dividend income the Company receives from its investment holdings. Many of the companies held within the investment portfolio have reduced or even cancelled the dividends they pay to their shareholders. While we have seen some rebound in dividend receipts during the first half of this year, our total dividend income remains subdued. Notwithstanding the reduced dividend distributions from some of our portfolio companies, we remain confident of the continuation of our dividend policy of paying an annual dividend equivalent to six per cent of the Company's NAV at the end of the preceding year. To fund its dividends the Company can use a combination of current year profits and the Distributable Reserve. As at 30 June 2021 the Company had a Distributable Reserve of £335.8 million. -------------- for the record I own the above.
ctrader3
13/8/2021
08:24
Dividends can be more reliable than share prices as they're driven by the companies performance itself and not by the whim of investors. As part of a total return / reinvestment strategy, this income could be reinvested into income assets or back into the equity market depending on the relative valuations. ---------------- sounds logical, the outturn will depend on what happens to the market when the QE is removed/reduced, then if inflation is temporary or not and the weighting of your dividend/growth portfolio. I would favour at this late stage of a bull market increasing the dividend weighting and decreasing the growth weighting but that's me and not u. GL
ctrader3
12/8/2021
22:59
I haven't posted here for a while but remain a holder and a regular reader! I don't want to get involved in the argument around 'value vs growth' as I have a foot in each camp and, up to now my growth holdings have far outperformed my value holdings ie total capital growth has outperformed my dividend paying holdings. However, I read with interest recent postings regarding moving holdings into higher yielding stocks and have begun to explore that option in a bit more detail. One of my current dividend paying holdings is with Aberdeen (formerly Standard Life). I'll use a £10,000 current capital value as an example. For that value of holding I'd receive annual dividend payments of £506. A yield of 5.06%. Now, supposing I sold my £10,000 holding and invested £6,583 in Henderson Far East Income (7.69% yield) I'd still enjoy annual dividend payments of £506 but I'd have £3,416 to invest elsewhere. In my case I'd split it equally between Fundsmith Equity, LF Blue Whale Equity and Rathbone Global Opportunities. No loss of dividend income but, in my opinion, a more balanced portfolio. Food for thought and comments welcomed!
zac0_4
12/8/2021
16:31
and in the case of MRCH at a better long term yield.
ctrader3
12/8/2021
16:19
Sounds good to me.And when the price falls, those dividends buy extra shares.
gateside
12/8/2021
14:34
summary. all shares are likely to fall, with growth stocks u will have to sit out the downturn and watch your portfolio decrease but dividend stocks will give u cash to buy more shares that pay a dividend at a lower price. sounds good for me, maybe not for others.
ctrader3
12/8/2021
14:26
Growth vs. Value Stock Performance and Inflation Stocks are often broken down into subcategories of value and growth. Value stocks have strong current cash flows that will slow over time, while growth stocks have little or no cash flow today but are expected to gradually increase over time. Therefore, when valuing stocks using the discounted cash flow method, in times of rising interest rates, growth stocks are negatively impacted far more than value stocks. Since interest rates are usually increased to combat high inflation, the corollary is that in times of high inflation, growth stocks will be more negatively impacted. This suggests a positive correlation between inflation and the return on value stocks and a negative one for growth stocks. Interestingly, the rate of change in inflation does not impact the returns of value versus growth stocks as much as the absolute level. The thought is that investors may overshoot their future growth expectations and upwardly misprice growth stocks. In other words, investors fail to recognize when growth stocks become value stocks, and the downward impact on growth stocks is harsh. Income-Generating Stocks and Inflation When inflation increases, purchasing power declines, and each dollar can buy fewer goods and services. For investors interested in income-generating stocks, or stocks that pay dividends, the impact of high inflation makes these stocks less attractive than during low inflation, since dividends tend to not keep up with inflation levels. In addition to lowering purchasing power, the taxation on dividends causes a double-negative effect. Despite not keeping up with inflation and taxation levels, dividend-yielding stocks do provide a partial hedge against inflation. Similar to the way interest rates impact the price of bonds—when rates rise, bond prices fall—dividend-paying stocks are affected by inflation: When inflation is on the upswing, income stock prices generally decline. So owning dividend-paying stocks in times of increasing inflation usually means the stock prices will decrease. But investors looking to take positions in dividend-yielding stocks are allowed to buy them cheap when inflation is rising, providing attractive entry points. The Bottom Line Investors try to anticipate the factors that impact portfolio performance and make decisions based on their expectations. Inflation is one of those factors that affect a portfolio. In theory, stocks should provide some hedge against inflation, because a company's revenues and profits should grow at the same rate as inflation, after a period of adjustment. However, inflation's varying impact on stocks confuses the decision to trade positions already held or to take new positions. In the U.S. market, the historical proof is noisy, but it does show a correlation to high inflation and lower returns for the overall market in most periods. When stocks are divided into growth and value categories, the evidence is clearer that value stocks perform better in high inflation periods, and growth stocks perform better during low inflation. One way investors can predict expected inflation is to analyze the commodity markets, although the tendency is to think that if commodity prices are rising, stocks should rise since companies “produce”; commodities. However, high commodity prices often squeeze profits, which in turn reduces stock returns. Therefore, following the commodity market may provide insight into future inflation rates. Investopedia
ctrader3
08/8/2021
18:17
'The world's most powerful activist investor has secretly built a stake in energy giant SSE in a move that could lead to a £20billion takeover bid for the FTSE100-listed company. ' another FTSE company (& big dividend payer) about to be snapped up by US ?
mister md
07/8/2021
19:46
What a cheerful soul you are!
gateside
07/8/2021
16:56
If I short . It will be at £ 5.55. As I said if it gets there it will mean that Corona has had no effect on the economy whatsoever and that is cobblers . And Dow 35.0000 during a Pandemic is the creation of one thing . Printing money , Printing money , printing money . Whats the US debt ?... 35.000.0000 millions . It is all going to come to a messy end. Investors.
superiorshares
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