Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Lloyds Banking Group LSE:LLOY London Ordinary Share GB0008706128 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -0.06p -0.09% 67.34p 67.33p 67.34p 67.67p 67.10p 67.27p 86,985,104 15:00:25
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Banks 39,611.0 4,238.0 2.9 23.2 48,653.37

Lloyds Share Discussion Threads

Showing 350526 to 350547 of 350550 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
13/12/2017
14:54
one of my former students,now a VP for Black Rot, says the view is that the GS researchers are no better, and probably worse than the rest of the City.
mr.elbee
13/12/2017
14:46
In addition to the headline figure for wage increases, the nurses get a notional promotion every year (while doing the same work), so they are actually doing a lot better than it might seem. I shouldn't waste too much sympathy on them.
grahamite2
13/12/2017
14:34
Alphorn. Another reminder of your blinkered view and putting all your hopes on Europe. The first nail in Trump's protectionist coffin happened yesterday. The Democrats won Alabama, America's most Republican state, just a reminder that there is a big old World outside of Europe and that win could spell disaster for Trump. Trump's tax plan that gives Corporation and the top 2% big tax breaks is yet to go through. The World is changing and the UK is in a good position to change for the better without being shackled to Europe's head in the sand unelected buffoons.
jacko07
13/12/2017
14:22
Alphorn..you are telling porkies, I have never said the economy is about to boom. I have said that Brexit will happen and the UK economy will strengthen over time as Europe will weaken. Your stance is bullish on Europe and bearish on the UK, you have been doom and gloom on the UK since the Brexit vote. I say you need to need to look at the big picture, if we have a no deal or bad deal with Europe we have the World to trade with. Like all remoaners, you cherry pick the few good things and deny the all of the rotten things about the EU. Read this link and please tell me what you think is not factual. hxxps://www.spectator.co.uk/2017/10/no-deal-with-the-eu-sounds-like-a-good-deal-to-me/
jacko07
13/12/2017
13:46
Especially for Raffles Key Currency's morning e-mail: GBP: Bank of England in the hot seat The Bank of England will be feeling the heat today after UK inflation has officially hit 6-year highs. Normally (what is normal these days?) the Pound would rise on the back of such news as it increases the odds of an increase in interest rates. But yesterday the Pound hardly flinched as investors simply don’t think the Bank of England has the bottle to vote for another hike. Today we have UK jobs data out, but most of the attention will be on tomorrow’s Bank of England meeting. It will be a case of words speaking louder than actions though. EUR: Has the rally run out of puff? The Euro has been a star performer most of this year but just lately seems to have lost a little momentum. The latest economic data has been a little patchy. Yesterday the latest ZEW sentiment surveys from Eurozone and Germany both weakened. Hmmm…could the Euro rally be fading? One thing’s for sure, it becomes harder and harder to beat ‘expectations’, because the better you perform the higher expectations become. Tomorrow the ECB also meets for their monthly rate decision. While there’s no hints at a rate increase, investors are always checking to see if Mario Draghi’s outlook becomes less cautious. USD: A big day ahead A big day ahead for the Dollar. First up we have the latest US inflation (CPI) data. The market expectation is for inflation to have risen to 2.2% in November from 2% the month before. Interestingly that’s well below the UK inflation rate of 3.1% and yet the US is more aggressively raising rates than us. Speaking of which, tonight the Fed gathers for its December meeting where it’s almost a ‘dead cert’ for another 0.25% rate hike. Today’s inflation numbers will obviously be more of a steer for what happens next year rather than today, so you could argue it’s the more important of the two.
aceuk
13/12/2017
12:53
Raffles - well that is some about turn. Yes, the UK economy is a mess and unlikely to improve any time soon. At least we agree on something! However, according to the missives of Messrs Jacko, Grahamite and co the economy is about to boom and there will be more than enough money for everybody so we have nothing to worry about.
alphorn
13/12/2017
12:43
Well you are a smart person alphorn and you know as well as I do that any "total package" the NHS can offer so long as our economy can only grow 1.5% a year is gonna be absolute rubbish
raffles the gentleman thug
13/12/2017
12:32
Raffles - you know as well as I do that the total package is what you focus on when reviewing jobs. Media and, it seems you today, will focus on the pay element often without considering the rest of a package. It is time to redraw some of these packages.
alphorn
13/12/2017
12:28
Labour will stop themselves in their tracks . Loved how the new leader in Scotland in his keynote speech wanted to Nationalise Scottish Water to great applause from the faithful. Doh , it has to be privatised first lol
bargainbob
13/12/2017
12:19
Well, assuming inflation is still running at 3%+ then that would certainly be a headline grabber which could stop Labour firmly in their tracks.
ladeside
13/12/2017
12:10
Actually ladeside it's my opinion that the Tories are trying to keep their powder dry as long as possible with regard to public sector wage settlements with the intention of fighting the next election on an inflation linked increase - putting about £6.5bn into the economy, which with the deficit where it'll be by then, will be comfortably affordable - that's the only way in my opinion for them to stand a chance of gaining a majority
raffles the gentleman thug
13/12/2017
12:05
Funnily enough, whether distorted or not, this ties in with one of my posts from yesterday which claimed that "easy credit" is giving employers a free ride and as such keeping wage growth at unrealistic levels. Totally agree raffles, the public sector will be sabre rattling for a real increase next year (and rightly so) and if it doesn't come to fruition then we can all look forward to strike action and much of it. The fact Corbyn and Labour are becoming a realistic threat (whether by their own means or lack of Tory leadership) also provides a major headache for May and her Government as any further screw ups will just open the door that little bit wider and public sector pay rises could be the particular battle where the war is either won or lost............
ladeside
13/12/2017
12:02
I agree alphorn these are not normal times - in normal times public sector bodies like the NHS and the Army etc would be able to comfortably meet their personnel needs but right now they can't precisely because of ten years of negative real interest rates.Specifically the NHS has about 40,000 unfilled nursing vacancies and the army about 4,000 troops short of target.And who in their right mind would take either of these jobs as a career which would leave them materially poorer in real terms year and year after year.That's why public sector wages need to rise and why this will be a centre piece of the next election. Carney knows this and if the BoE is to retain any credibility with regard to its independence it needs to talk tougher on fighting inflation.
raffles the gentleman thug
13/12/2017
11:48
Raffles you wilfully attempt to distort what I am saying :-(
aceuk
13/12/2017
11:44
Raffles - IMO the BofE will go out of its way not to 'rock the boat' over the next months. In normal times rates would IMO rise, but these are not normal times (for the UK).
alphorn
13/12/2017
11:41
Well aceuk after nigh on ten years of negative real interest rates real people are getting screwed out there and the BoE is looking proper exposed. They know full well public sector wage demands are only gonna get louder and louder.But we will see whose wrong in next couple of weeks eh aceuk because my bet is members are gonna talk tougher re rate policy - that's all I'm saying - but you obviously disagree and believe nobody's feeling the squeeze because everyone's borrowing money and the BoE will blissfully ignore this - but that's your prerogative
raffles the gentleman thug
13/12/2017
11:35
Ladeside - I ignore much of what is 'reported' and try to listen first hand to key speeches/interviews on UK or Continental TV channels. What can not be denied by any party is that the time is slipping away very quickly.
alphorn
13/12/2017
11:30
Still think you are wrong - like me you will remember real inflation - 3 or 4% is immaterial other than real people don't feel any richer because they haven't got and extra 20 or 30 quid going in their wallet each week, doesn't matter they had to spend it to stand still. The other problem (not understood by anybody much including apparently Central Bankers) is real people do not actually see real money anymore: o they get paid straight into their bank accounts o their bills (mortgage, utility, mobile phone contract, car purchase plan, Barclaycard bill, etc.) go straight out of their bank account o they do the weekly shop with their Barclaycard o they go out for a meal with their Barclaycard o they go out for a drink with their Barclaycard o they go on holiday with their Barclaycard o nobody sees REAL cash anymore It's all just to surreal There is no urgency
aceuk
13/12/2017
11:19
Just making point aceuk that in short term the BoE will at a minimum have to up their tough talk rhetoric, and that should be Sterling and LLOY supportive. For eight years they've been lying to us by suggesting inflation was a temporary phenomenon and yet it's persistent and not going away anytime soon as far as I can see it.
raffles the gentleman thug
13/12/2017
11:00
What Davis said was, of course, true, but it was unhelpful for him to come right out and say it. I assume there was serious unrest in the ranks after Hammond's idiotic suggestion we'd pay come what may and Davis needed to give some reassurance.
grahamite2
13/12/2017
10:59
We're now going through the "poker" stage with bluff and counter bluff all being reported with Pro Brexit or Anti Brexit spin, depending on the particular commentator and their personal political agendas. I'm actually finding it all pretty boring now as ultimately we all know a deal will be secured which will minimise disruption to trade and movement for all parties involved, there really is no other way it can go. Remember, it's not the UK or EU politicians who have the power but the multi nationals who operate across the globe, they are the ones pulling the strings and they are the ones who will ultimately insure that there's as little disruption to their trade as possible.........
ladeside
13/12/2017
10:52
It used to be that a gentleman's word is his bond. Clearly no longer as I posted yesterday following Davis' Sunday interview: "I listened to this interview on Sunday and I did not misunderstand Davis. He was naïve/stupid in the extreme to even go near the subject. '''''''MEPs are going to toughen their demands in the light of what David Davis said in his Andrew Marr Show interview on Sunday because Davis implied the UK government was not fully committed to what it had agreed". I gather now that Davis has agreed to put the Friday Phase I submission into law. .........all this eats up precious time. Do these people actually know what they are doing???
alphorn
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