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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Jpmorgan Asian Investment Trust Plc LSE:JAI London Ordinary Share GB0001320778 ORD 25P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 401.00 0.00 00:00:00
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
399.00 403.00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 5.41 4.99 80.4 383
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
- O 0 401.00 GBX

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Date Time Title Posts
13/4/202021:43JP Morgan Asian Investment Trust38

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DateSubject
17/1/2021
08:20
Jpmorgan Asian Investment Daily Update: Jpmorgan Asian Investment Trust Plc is listed in the Equity Investment Instruments sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker JAI. The last closing price for Jpmorgan Asian Investment was 401p.
Jpmorgan Asian Investment Trust Plc has a 4 week average price of 0p and a 12 week average price of 0p.
The 1 year high share price is 423p while the 1 year low share price is currently 375p.
There are currently 95,546,993 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 0 shares. The market capitalisation of Jpmorgan Asian Investment Trust Plc is £383,143,441.93.
13/4/2020
13:26
ali47fish: hasn't this inv trust changed its ticker to JAGI- although citwire does list ti as JAI
24/3/2018
11:53
loganair: Great expectations by Marina Gerner: So what is the outlook for the BRICS? Stammers says that, ultimately, China and India are looking to become leading global providers of goods and services, so they make things. In contrast, Russia and Brazil are expected to become the global giants in commodities, so they provide the basic raw materials needed to make those things. Paul McNamara, an investment director and lead manager on emerging market bond, currency and hedge fund strategies at GAM, says: ‘China and India matter a lot; the other two are secondary.’ All the BRICS countries face different obstacles. ‘Russia is crippled by dysfunctional institutions and corruption, but Brazil is slightly better off,’ comments McNamara. Redwood says Russia has ‘suffered a setback from the lower oil price, which has hit its export earnings and tax revenues, and from Western actions, which have made some trade and transactions more difficult’. Redwood observes that Brazil has been through a bad political and economic crisis, with recession, high inflation and difficult corruption problems forcing changes of government. He says: ‘There is now some hope of recovery, but there remain deep-seated economic and political problems to resolve fully.’ South Africa too has been suffering from political instability and failing economic policies. ‘Future sustained progress in both Brazil and South Africa will need stable reform-oriented governments that can shake off the problems of the past,’ he adds. India has become the poster child for reform-led recovery in emerging markets, argues James Penny, senior investment manager at TAM Asset Management. ‘With the appointment of prime minster Modi, the country has been put on a path of steep and deep economic and government reform to bring its economy and vast middle-class population to the forefront in the modern market.’ ‘India has scope to become one of the world’s largest economies, but it still has a lot further to go to increase incomes per head.’ Moreover, South Africa, Russia and to some extent Brazil rely on mining and the production of oil and commodities, whereas China and India are more dependent on imports of raw materials. Dominant China: However, Penny says the biggest and, on the global stage, the loudest of the BRICS nations remains China. The country continues to make headlines speculating about whether its economy could suffer a ‘hard landing’ in the face of its highly leveraged corporate sector and a fall in GDP to 6 per cent. But he is keen to put these figures in context: ‘Let’s be clear here,’ he says. ‘The US is struggling to find 4 per cent GDP growth, the UK is looking at 1.5 per cent, and the world is worrying about a Chinese slowdown to 6 per cent GDP growth?’ -China, not India, will dominate future Asian growth: The growth rates of the BRICS economies, with the possible exception of India’s, over the next 10 years is likely to be about half that of the previous decade, according to Smith. India’s and China’s shares of global GDP growth will probably be smaller, but the countries will remain dominant. ‘China will remain the largest [BRICS] economy and should continue to command investors’ attention,’ he says. ‘But if India opens up and reforms, investors should begin to devote more of their attention to the subcontinent.’ That said, he points out that, given the relative size of the two economies today, it would still take more than 30 years for India’s GDP to exceed China’s, even if India achieves all its reform goals and China achieves few of its aims. Ultimately, the strength of the BRICS as an investment proposition is their very diversity, argues Ballard. ‘They are so different that they provide an element of diversification beneficial for any long term investor.’
18/9/2017
21:05
pjw956: I have a small holding in this trust and watch fairly closely - trend has been reasonable this year on the whole - dipped over the last month - but over the long term should go in the right direction ...I do share some concerns over china holdings
29/7/2017
18:59
loganair: 30th June 2017 - Portfolio analysis by JP Morgan: The Company's net asset value outperformed the benchmark, while the share price performed in line. Stock selection and country allocation contributed positively overall. Stock selection in China was the biggest detractor. AAC Technologies resumed trading on 7 June after being suspended in May, and shares recovered to an extent after the company issued a detailed statement refuting the short seller's allegations. Alibaba continued to outperform on the back of earnings upgrades. Not owning China Mobile and Baidu also contributed positively. Elsewhere, our financial holdings in Hong Kong (AIA Group) and Thailand (K-Bank) added to returns. At the stock level, the top contributor was Eclat Textile in Taiwan, which benefited from positive monthly sales and expectations for a new supply contract with a large e-commerce company. The worst-performing stock was IMAX China. Although the company is delivering on new installations, short-term financial performance is being dictated by the hit/miss of box office titles. Other notable detractors include KEPCO. Following an order to shut down old coal fire plants in May, it was announced in June that the construction of two nuclear plants would be halted. I have written several times to JP Morgan asking for the percentage of the Asian trust held in China to be reduced. Currently 56.6% of this trust is held in Greater China while I would like to see this reduced towards the 40% level while I would like a percentage held in other Indian Sub-Continent and Indo-China Countries and Ex-CIS States.
28/4/2017
08:00
loganair: Asian economies deliver 60pc of global growth: Growth is picking up in two-thirds of economies in Asia, supported by higher external demand, rebounding global commodity prices and domestic reforms, making the region the largest single contributor to global growth at 60 percent. A new Asian Development Bank (ADB) report forecast on Monday gross domestic product (GDP) growth in Asia and the Pacific to reach 5.7% in 2017 and 2018, a slight deceleration from the 5.8% registered in 2016. Asian Development Outlook (ADO) says: “Developing Asia continues to drive the global economy even as the region adjusts to a more consumption-driven economy in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and looming global risks.” Yasuyuki Sawada, ADB’s chief economist, said: “While uncertain policy changes in advanced economies do pose a risk to the outlook, we feel that most economies are well positioned to weather potential short-term shocks.” The US, euro area and Japan are expected to collectively grow by 1.9% in 2017 and 2018. Rising consumer and business confidence and a declining unemployment rate have fueled US growth, but uncertainty over future economic policies may test confidence. The euro area continues to strengthen, but its outlook is somewhat clouded by uncertainties such as Brexit. Meanwhile, Japan remains dependent on its ability to maintain export growth to continue its expansion, according to the report. It added the PRC’s growth continues to moderate as the government implements measures to transition the economy to a more consumption-driven model. Overall output is expected to slow to 6.5% in 2017 and 6.2% in 2018, down from 2016’s 6.7%. “South Asia remains the fastest growing of all sub-regions, with growth reaching 7% in 2017 and 7.2% in 2018. In India, the sub-region’s largest economy, growth is expected to pick up to 7.4% in fiscal year (FY) 2017 and 7.6% in FY2018, following the 7.1% registered last FY. “The impact of the demonetization of high-value banknotes is dissipating as the replacement banknotes enter circulation. Stronger consumption and fiscal reforms are also expected to improve business confidence and investment prospects in the country.” The Southeast Asia region will grow 4.8% in 2017 and 5% in 2018, from the 4.7% recorded last year. Commodity producers such as Malaysia, Viet Nam and Indonesia will be boosted by the recovery of global food and fuel prices. Growth in Central Asia is expected to reach 3.1% in 2017 and 3.5% in 2018, on the back of rising commodity prices and increased exports, albeit with large heterogeneity among countries in the region. Countries in the Pacific will reach 2.9% and 3.3% growth over the next 2 years as the region’s largest economy, Papua New Guinea, stabilises following a fiscal crunch and Fiji and Vanuatu recover from natural disasters. Regional consumer price inflation is projected to accelerate to 3% in 2017 and 3.2% in 2018 from the 2.5% in 2016 on the back of stronger consumer demand and increasingly rising global commodity prices. Inflation projections for the next two years, however, are well below the 10-year regional average of 3.9%. Risks to the outlook include higher US interest rates, which will accelerate capital outflows, although this risk is mitigated to some degree by abundant liquidity throughout the region. On the domestic front, increasing household debt in some Asian economies is a rising risk. The risk can be countered through prudent macro prudential policies, such as requiring tighter debt-to-income ratios for loans.
16/12/2016
16:58
loganair: Emerging markets in Asia are expected to continue to grow in 2017, offering opportunities for investors amid ongoing global political and market volatility. Despite considerable political uncertainties in the near term in the US, the UK and Europe, as well as potential changes to US trade policy under the coming Trump administration, modest improvement in global economic momentum is expected to continue in the year ahead. Against this global backdrop, opportunities can be identified in riskier, higher yielding asset classes, including Asian equities, which can offer better returns for investors seeking to manage market volatility. Geoff Lewis, Senior Asia Strategist at Manulife Asset Management, said: "Despite the political uncertainty following Brexit and the US Presidential election, we're cautiously optimistic about the year ahead. US fixed investment is expected to pick up and global monetary policy is likely to remain accommodative which will alleviate pressures on the equity markets. There are significant opportunities in Asia for investors. The region hasn't been immune to the challenges facing the global market economy, but it's still, in our opinion, the highest quality emerging market in the world and likely to draw increased interest in 2017." Asia (ex-Japan) is expected to outpace the US, Europe and other emerging markets such as Latin America, with 6% gross domestic product growth forecast for 2017. The latest Manulife Investor Sentiment Index (MISI)* also reveals that Asian investor sentiment for investing in Emerging Asia has jumped from 19 in 2015 to 34 in 2016. 2017: A turning point for Asian Equities: 2017 looks to be a turning point for Asian equities, which will generate opportunities for investors. While Asian stock earnings were soft in recent years, earnings are expected to be revised up in the coming year as a result of an improved economic environment as well as supportive fiscal and monetary policies. More broadly, when compared to 2016, capital flows, exchange rates and bond spreads across most of the region are expected to continue to stabilise in 2017, creating a more positive macro environment for equities. Real interest rates in Asia, which constitute the improving inflation outlook, are increasingly more favourable, indicating a lower vulnerability for Asian stocks to future interest rate increases from the US Federal Reserve. Among the Asian markets, opportunities should become available in Chinese equities, as evident by the improving private investment landscape and the first positive Producer Price Index (PPI) reading in 55 months. North Asian markets, such as China, South Korea and Taiwan, are also expected to perform better in the early part of 2017 due to the perceived positive impact of fiscal stimuluses and increased economic activities in the US. The uncertainty over forthcoming elections in Europe may result in an increased volatility in global markets and Southeast Asia should therefore perform relatively better given that its economies are driven largely by domestic consumption and policies, as was observed in 2016. The MISI survey revealed that 80% of investors indicate that the next six months will be a "neutral to good time" to invest in equities. The top three reasons cited by those investors that favour Asian stocks were signs that market conditions are improving (41.5%), a stable market place (38.5%), and low interest and lending rates that drive the asset class (35.8%). Ronald Chan, Chief Investment Officer of Equities Asia (ex-Japan) at Manulife Asset Management, commented: "We believe 2017 could prove a turning point for Asian equities, particularly if China's gradual economic rebound presents positive knock-on effects for other regional economies. As the economic outlook brightens, valuations are also expected to improve, which could offer meaningful gains for opportunistic investors. At Manulife, we see constructive opportunities in Indonesia, China and India equities."
27/9/2016
16:15
loganair: Emerging markets recover, but now for the hard part by Michelle McGagh: Emerging markets have been strong performers this year, but now earnings need to improve, say investment trust managers. Emerging markets have only entered the first leg of a recovery and company earnings need to improve before a genuine turnaround can take hold. Emerging markets have had a rocky few years but investments trusts focused on the sector are among the best performers of 2016. Shares in these trusts have risen 31% on average since the start of the year. The outcome of the EU referendum in June provided a further boost to emerging market investments as the value of sterling fell, however, it is only just the start of the recovery. Carlos Hardenberg, manager of the Templeton Emerging Markets investment trust, said the ‘pendulum was swinging back’ in favour or emerging markets. Shares in the trust are up 42.8% this year, making up all the ground lost in a torrid 2015. Hardenberg took control the fund from veteran emerging market manager Mark Mobius last September. ‘The market always over reacts when the general consensus turns negative,’ said Hardenberg. ‘Share prices are more volatile than underlying earnings. We are seeing industrial production, as a measure of recovery, increasing in emerging markets...if you go country by country, there is a healthy degree of orders. ‘GDP growth is slowly improving and over the next two years markets like Russia and Brazil will see the biggest relative improvements.’ Omar Negyal, manager of the JPMorgan Global Emerging Markets Income trust, targets income rather than capital growth in his fund and said the real recovery in emerging markets will have begun when company earnings stabilise. ‘What we are seeing in emerging markets is the first leg of recovery,’ he said. ‘China is stabilising and there is an improvement in trade balances in emerging markets. For the second leg [of recovery] to come through, earnings have to start to improve. We are at the start of that,' he said. He said improved earnings would help the ‘rerating of high yield equities in the asset class’. China has been the main problem for emerging markets, with slowing growth dragging the sector down. Hardenberg holds 19% of his trust in the country. He said there were still concerns around housing and ‘over capacity in steel and cement that will have to be dealt with in future’. ‘The big negative for emerging markets is the overall impact of global uncertainty and demand and supply in commodity markets,’ said Hardenberg. Former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund Ken Rogoff has also warned of the threat China poses to the global economy due to its high levels of debt. He said there was ‘no question’ that ‘China is the greatest risk’. ‘China has been the engine of global growth,’ he said. ‘China has been really important. But China is going through a big political revolution. And I think the economy is slowing down much more than the official figures show,’ he said. However, the good news is that sentiment towards other emerging markets is becoming more positive and local emerging market currencies are ‘slowly recovery’ and companies are finally keeping ‘capital expenditure down and concentrating on cost management’, said Hardenberg. Emerging companies in mid and small cap - there are more opportunities there,’ said Hardenberg, adding that many tech companies - of which he has been a fan - were ‘leap-frogging’ more established businesses. In particular, Hardenberg said he looked for companies ‘that have sustainable business models in an area with a high barrier to entry’. ‘We are expecting that emerging markets will see a sideways development over the next 12 months and there is a clear risk from China...and there is some danger already priced in,’ he said. Although Asia is the largest geographic weighting in his trust, Hardenberg said he did not ‘have exposure to Chinese banks or insurance companies’ because of their poor asset quality and concerns the companies were ‘hiding how they are restructuring’. China is the concern for Negyal, whose trust has mounted a recovery almost as impressive as Templeton's this year, with the shares up 38.6%. ‘China is very important for emerging markets at a quarter of the asset class and for the rest of the emerging markets it is vital... because it drives the rest of the emerging markets via trade links,’ he said. ‘That’s commodity prices in Latin America or manufactured goods in the rest of Asia. There are very few emerging markets that are isolated from China. From an economic perspective, Latin America will benefit from stabilisation [in China].’ Also important for Negyal is for emerging markets ‘to re-enter growth territory’ to ensure companies can continue to pay dividends. ‘Emerging market dividends and earnings have been under pressure,’ he said. ‘The near term outlook for dividends is still a concern and it is something we want to be cautious about but in the mid and long-term growth opportunities can be seen as well,’ said Negyal.
07/8/2016
11:02
loganair: 31st May 2016 - Portfolio analysis by JP Morgan: The trust's share price and net asset value outperformed the benchmark in May. Strong stock selection in Taiwan, India and Korea accounted for the outperformance. The top contributor was Tencent, a Chinese internet play, which reported strong revenue and profit numbers for the first quarter of 2016, helped by a strong momentum in the mobile games division. A number of the portfolio's technology stocks which are focused towards smartphone growth were also strong contributors over the month, stocks such as AAC Technologies, Advanced Semiconductor Engineering and Largan Precision. Our holding in a number of financials in China and India underperformed. Ping An Insurance in China reported strong results, but the market remains concerned about reinvestment risk in the low return environment. China Merchants Bank reported strong results but concerns over higher non-performing loans lead to underperformance.
10/2/2016
21:56
loganair: 31st December 2015 - Portfolio analysis by JP Morgan: The trust's share price and net asset value outperformed the benchmark, due to stock selection in China and Thailand. The biggest detractor was country allocation within ASEAN (overweight Thailand and underweight Malaysia and Singapore) and an overweight in China. China Vanke, China's largest homebuilder, outperformed following a change of ownership as the largest shareholder, China Resources, was replaced by Shenzhen Jushenghua. Airports of Thailand performed well as it raised its net profit numbers on increased air traffic and tourism numbers. ASE in Taiwan rose after Siliconware Precision announced that it would discuss the offer made by ASE. Changan Auto rallied as auto sales for both domestic and foreign brands rose. On the negative side, China Everbright was hurt by reports of construction delays given stricter environmental standards and concerns over an earnings miss. Largan, Catcher and AAC Technologies (in the Apple supply chain) underperformed, given Apple order cuts and poor sell-through numbers.
26/12/2015
09:54
loganair: 30th November 2015 - Portfolio analysis by JP Morgan: The trust's net asset value outperformed the benchmark, while the share price underperformed. Stock selection in China and India contributed positively, while stock selection in Korea detracted. Our holding in ikang Healthcare benefited performance as the stock rallied 26% after receiving a USD 1.5 billion acquisition offer from an investor group that includes its main competitor. Our core internet position in Tencent also helped performance given strong mobile gaming and advertising revenue, which are major long-term growth drivers. Financials, such as China Vanke and AIA, performed strongly. Indian auto stocks, such as Martui Suzuki and Tata Motors, rallied on the back of strong domestic car sales in October. Underperformers included Vipshop, Samsung Electronics and ASE. Vipshop fell after missing revenue guidance for the first time in its listed history. Samsung Electronics fell on a weak fourth-quarter outlook given seasonal factors and a continued slowdown in its smartphone segment.
Jpmorgan Asian Investment share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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