Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
John Laing Infrastructure Fund LSE:JLIF London Ordinary Share GG00B4ZWPH08 ORD 0.01P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.20p +0.17% 118.60p 118.20p 118.40p 118.60p 118.20p 118.20p 2,829,086 16:35:03
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 175.2 160.4 18.1 6.5 1,172.75

John Laing Infrastructure Share Discussion Threads

Showing 351 to 375 of 375 messages
Chat Pages: 15  14  13  12  11  10  9  8  7  6  5  4  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
06/2/2018
15:45
:-) Thanks, I'll use JLIF as a forward-looking indicator then !
mister md
06/2/2018
15:16
@ Mister MD - always helps to get your panic in early!
jonwig
06/2/2018
15:09
impressive it hasnt dropped during the global crash (so far)
mister md
29/1/2018
08:14
Sigh of relief!
winsome
29/1/2018
07:12
'No material impact' on company following liquidation of Carillion. £3m transition costs only. A big contrast to HICL's potential £50m. This ought to bounce back now ... ?
jonwig
29/1/2018
07:09
Further update regarding liquidation of Carillion plc John Laing Infrastructure Fund Limited ('JLIF' or the 'Company'), the listed infrastructure investment company, notes recent commentary regarding the impact of the liquidation of Carillion plc ("Carillion"). JLIF refers to its announcement made on 16 January 2018 in respect of the compulsory liquidation of Carillion. John Laing Capital Management Ltd, the Company's Investment Adviser, continues to work on implementing its contingency plans to replace Carillion as Facilities Management ("FM") provider on the 9 JLIF projects and expects this to occur on similar terms to the existing contracts within the projects. The Investment Adviser anticipates that there will be minimal service disruption, however initially expects additional advisory and transaction costs in respect of the appointment of replacement facilities managers to cost approximately £3 million in aggregate. JLIF reiterates that it has no projects currently in construction where Carillion is the contractor. JLIF owns one project where Carillion is still liable for any construction defects found on the project, with the construction period having completed over 10 years ago. JLIF reiterates that a recently completed routine defects survey has not highlighted any significant areas of concern. The Investment Adviser believes that the compulsory liquidation of Carillion should have no material impact on the Company and no impact on the Company's dividend policy. The Company will continue to manage the situation as it develops and provide further updates as appropriate.
skinny
26/1/2018
12:34
I would hope that JLIF don't warn as it would contradict their earlier statement which pointed to little -or no impact as it seems al partnerships- as I read it. I exited at 117.45 having wanted to sell last Friday at 119p. I don't think these are bad investments and the yield is good and improving but there is too much noise around these and therefore best avoided for now.
mach100
26/1/2018
07:20
There seems to be little support for bringing PFI projects back in house. The reason Carillion went under was their extremely tight profit margins on projects. Something like 2%. So they were hardly milking the taxpayer. Likewise for companies like HICL and JLIF - they are hardly making huge profits. I see HICL warned this morning they will take a 2% hit on their NAV. JLIF may do similar. Barely significant IMO. As long as the divs keep coming then these remain long term holds for me.
winsome
25/1/2018
10:31
I am down 6% so far, the 'Corbyn effect' is getting on my nerves - hopefully will see a turnaround if and w hen people realise his methodology will lead to financial ruin and a even more fractured society.
bothdavis
18/1/2018
22:30
jlen appears slightly safer than jlif at present for income seekers, very similar income levels.
pjw956
18/1/2018
17:37
More likely from the general negative publicity for PFI contracts today following the NAO report.
grahamburn
18/1/2018
17:16
is this fall from the carillion fallout?
swedeee
16/1/2018
06:33
Two useful articles, I think: Http://citywire.co.uk/investment-trust-insider/news/infrastructure-funds-activate-carillion-emergency-plans/a1083554?ref=investment-trust-insider-latest-news-list Http://citywire.co.uk/investment-trust-insider/news/carillion-collapse-corbyn-rise-put-infrastructure-in-play/a1083786?ref=investment-trust-insider-latest-news-list
jonwig
23/11/2017
05:44
Useful article on both HICL and JLIF: Http://citywire.co.uk/investment-trust-insider/news/hicl-infrastructure-prepares-to-step-in-if-carillion-goes-bust/a1071404?ref=investment-trust-insider-latest-news-list
jonwig
22/11/2017
09:41
Bought into these yesterday - fallen a long way very fast and to get them around NAV was an opportunity not to be missed
essential
16/11/2017
14:05
Interesting political angle: Http://citywire.co.uk/investment-trust-insider/news/ian-cowie-thanks-to-labour-infrastructure-looks-good-value/a1069561?ref=investment-trust-insider-latest-news-list
jonwig
15/11/2017
11:10
And, going back to yesterday's point, would mean most of the discount covered after two further years of dividends ( although take your point re. possible retrospective windfall taxation). Depressing to watch the price slide recently but selling out now does not seem the best move as we are pretty well back to par with NAV and there are many reasons why the worst may not happen with regard to Labour's plans.
cousin jack
15/11/2017
09:15
speeds - thanks. Nils Pratley is a clever chap. used to work for the BBC I think. Funnily enough, JLIF's 86% of book value is close to the 88% I gave as a rough estimate of a windfall tax impact. So will JLIF trade at a 14% discouhnt to NAV anytime soon? A 6.7% yield would be tempting given the threats are no more than speculation.
jonwig
15/11/2017
08:45
PFI firms are arming themselves for a Jeremy Corbyn government - HTTPS://www.theguardian.com/politics/nils-pratley-on-finance/2017/nov/13/pfi-firms-labour-government-jeremy-corbyn
speedsgh
14/11/2017
11:08
While a windfall on utilities is straightforward, one on PFI or PPI is much more complex. When does lending to government bodies end and PFI begin? It would deeply unsettle the market if the UK government effectively imposed a surplus tax upon people who have lent to the UK government. Taxing an activity (utilities) is one thing, taxing lenders on the basis of who they lend to seems fraught with the risk of legal challenge I would have thought.
mad foetus
14/11/2017
07:57
mad - both JLIF and HICL are domiciled in Guernsey, and pay no tax at holding company level. Their operating companies which are UK-domiciled (the PFI contractors) pay CT at the UK level before sending taxed dividends to the parent, which is in effect an investment trust. Hence the valuation of the dividend stream improves as UK CT is reduced. It may well be the case that the underlying PFI companies must be legally domiciled in the UK since, if nothing else, they are given back to the UK government at the end of their contract. I wouldn't think it's "up to parliament" to decide the value of compensation, but don't actually know. The idea of a windfall tax would be relatively straightforward compared with the legal minefield of nationalisation. And of course there are precedents for that!
jonwig
14/11/2017
06:50
Without knowing the details I'm wondering how that would legally work. It would certainly drive vehicles offshore, and I think most PPI payments have to be made net of any tax. I am struggling to think how a UK government can tax a non-UK entity solely on the basis of investments it makes in the UK. It wouldn't be entirely straightforward, but I don't know the details of the proposal.
mad foetus
14/11/2017
06:32
David Hardy of JLIF interviewed on R4 just now, commenting on yesterday's announcement. Gave a pretty robust defence of the PFI model and said the legal contracts would ensure fair compensation. It's a pity the interviewer dind't press him on Stella Creasey's windfall tax suggestion, which I think a much more likely and insidious propsal.
jonwig
14/11/2017
06:23
Yes - the 86% is a best case in the event of cancelling (what JLIF would ask for). Could well get negotiated / manipulated down further from there.
belgraviaboy
13/11/2017
21:01
Article in the telegraph is a worry. The snarky comment from the Labour "spokesman" says it will be for Parliament to decide on the value of these contracts, so expect a Venezuelan style requisition by the comrades...
zcaprd7
Chat Pages: 15  14  13  12  11  10  9  8  7  6  5  4  Older
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