Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Gli Finance LSE:GLIF London Ordinary Share GB00B0CL3P62 ORD NPV
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.50p +3.36% 15.375p 14.75p 16.00p 15.375p 14.875p 14.875p 130,465 13:16:14
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 12.0 -16.5 -6.5 - 47.51

Gli Finance Share Discussion Threads

Showing 2501 to 2521 of 2525 messages
Chat Pages: 101  100  99  98  97  96  95  94  93  92  91  90  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
18/7/2017
18:42
"FundingKnight has increased the number of sales people focusing on the UK market across its existing geographical footprint." ie. it has increased its run rate losses in a double or quits strategy To be fair look at what happened to Netflix share price last week on the basis that it increased its subscriber base! Who needs to actually make profits?
makinbuks
14/7/2017
14:51
RNS Number : 1419L GLI Finance Limited 14 July 2017 GLI Finance Limited ("GLI Finance" or the "Company") FundingKnight granted full FCA authorisation GLI Finance is pleased to announce that its specialist peer to peer/marketplace lender, FundingKnight, has been granted full authorisation from the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). FundingKnight has been operating under interim permissions since 2014, when the FCA commenced the process of regulating the peer-to-peer industry. This is an important milestone for the business and demonstrates its commitment to maintaining the expected standards of regulatory compliance designed to protect both funders and clients. It is also the Company's intention to move FundingKnight into the Sancus BMS Group of companies (also known as Pillar 1) operating alongside Sancus Finance, its specialist working capital finance provider. This structure will expand the Group's alternative finance offering into the UK asset based lending market and allow the business to take advantage of a broader range of commercial opportunities. In anticipation of this approval, FundingKnight has increased the number of sales people focusing on the UK market across its existing geographical footprint. For further information, please contact:
cheshire2
11/7/2017
10:51
£10k purchase by a NED. Suspect it might take somewhat more than that to turn around sentiment here! Director/PDMR Shareholding - HTTPS://www.investegate.co.uk/gli-finance-limited--glif-/rns/director-pdmr-shareholding/201707101711436435K/
speedsgh
05/7/2017
13:27
I should think the "Minority Investors" were delighted to get £350k returned to them for their 10% stake plus the prefs at par!! How can a business losing £2m on a T/O of £0.9m and net assets of £0.9m be valued reasonably at £3.5m? Bear in mind those figures are six months old so there will have been another loss this year and reduction in the net assets. The only positive thing I can say is it is another step in simplifying the structure of the group, but what a price to pay!
makinbuks
05/7/2017
03:13
GLIF is being blead by the BOD !!!
garycook
04/7/2017
23:32
A £2m loss on £0.9m turnover is pathetic. I sold the remainder of my holding a week or so ago ....
fenners66
15/6/2017
12:11
To all holders in GLIF,you should really sell now.I can see,and I am convinced that GLIF will,over time,just shrink. I think they made a big mistake by investing in so many p2p platforms.In order to do so they issued shares like confetti and when the market would take no more ordinary, they changed to issuing loan stock. Over the next few years, I imagine there will have to bite the bullet with more right downs, and eventually Somerston will buy out the remaining ordinaries at a fraction of todays price after it is below 10p. I have seen this before - Somerston have out themselves in a controlling position and although they have paid more than 10p to get to that position, there is no way they will pay more than pennies to get the rest - because they can block anyone else. Don't be swayed by the dividend which in any event is now restricted to cash earnings which will probably be a loss for the year.My advice is to sell out of GLIF now.GC
garycook
01/6/2017
08:30
One thing I have learned from a few years on ADVFN is that if you see two or three people holding a rational and informed debate on a share (rather than just mud-slinging) then there is frequently a great opportunity lurking under the surface. And that opportunity is either to lose 100% or to make 200% or more - its then just a question of assessing the relative probabilities of the differing outcomes. My take is that its worth a tiny punt - and that is all I have ever held here. My gut reaction when they started gambling on P2P was that their business model was highly risky - unfortunately I did not follow my instinct. Now - my instinct is that upside potential makes it worth maintaining a tiny holding - but treat it the way I treat my EIS/angel investment funds, knowing full well that there is at least a 50% chance of total loss, but hoping that there is something there that will come good.
future financier
01/6/2017
07:26
Kenny.PM for you.
garycook
01/6/2017
00:23
The Sancus BMS businesses produced a return on gross assets of 2.12% (page 24 of the annual report) - so that is hardly anything to write home about - and it is unclear if that was before or after an expense ratio stated as being 48.5% (presumably 48.5% of gross income from loans). You cite "decent increases" in the size of co-lender loan books. The operating profits for Sancus BMS increased from £2.6m to £3.537m in 2016 (page 25). Those profits are small figures in the context of the overall group and it's market capitalisation. Therefore, they are very unlikely to be the saviour of the group. They would have to increase revenue "over 25%" for quite a few years just to achieve break even as a group. Markets being what they are, the company may not have the luxury to keep trading at a loss indefinitely on the promise that one day it will become profitable and/or one of their investee companies will hit the jackpot. Besides which, if the big banks are finding it hard to make money at current interest rate margins, what chance GLIF? Unlike GLIF, the big banks do not have expensive loans they have to service; they mainly rely on customer deposits which they pay very little interest upon. Since I started having a close look at GLIF, having not been a holder here for about 3 years, I have come to the conclusion that I would not invest unless the share price was at or about 5p. Above 5p per share, it is just a big gamble that someone who has more money than sense comes alone with a bid at, say, 10p per share. I would need that large of a margin of safety because there would still be a fair probability of a total wipeout. I know the above valuations may seem absurdly low to someone who looks at the share price graph. However, what I have found out is that the destruction of capital has been more or less total - even to the extent that I am not at all certain that there is anything to invest in here - at any price! I am quite shocked that a company that previously had a great business investing in CLO loans has destroyed more or less all value by selling that portfolio and gambling the whole lot in P2P start-ups. The previous management also issued shares and loan capital to raise yet more money to invest in P2P start-ups! Turning the valuation question on it's head - what is a company that is likely to be loss making for many year's to come and with dubious assets worth? I believe it is only worth hope value because unless there is a take over or windup, a shareholder receives nothing for the foreseeable future. Further, "foreseeable future" may become infinite if the company keeps going just to pay the directors salaries while gradually consuming its assets in annual operating losses and asset write downs. The above is not intended as investment advice - no doubt the share price will have many bounces over the next few months and years, but I think with both a) the balance sheet not yet reflecting a true write down in the value of assets/investments and, b) operating losses (never mind investment losses) continuing for the foreseeable future (or at least until base rate exceeds 5%, which may not be in our lifetime), the overall long term trajectory in the share price will be down. As always, I think the question is - what are you getting if you invest here? I certainly cannot find anything that is either sustainable or of substance compared to the current market capitalisation but I remain open to being convinced otherwise?
kenny
31/5/2017
22:01
I'm out sold today. Total disaster.
the monkster
31/5/2017
22:01
I'm out sold today. Total disaster.
the monkster
31/5/2017
18:11
Yes, I know that the company made an operating loss of just over £2.9m last year and I agree that the limited cost savings achieved are at the edges. The 2016 figures are ugly in the extreme, but it was a year when the company was restructured and the sins of 2015 were addressed. I think that the turn around (if it is to be achieved) depends on how quickly the Sancus BMS loan book can be increased and more particularly how that translates through to increased revenue, particularly from structuring fees and funds under management, because I am not expecting the level of group capital deployed to increase much. Save for the unlikely circumstance of a realisation of funds from the sale of FTV interests this year, there will obviously be a net holding cost for the FTV part of the business. The tables at page 26 of the AR show decent increases in the size of the co-lender loan books for both the Sancus and BMS Finance divisions (a total of £111m for H2 2016, up from £82.4m for H2 2015)and we are also told that the SancusBMS loan book (group capital) totalled £38.8m at the end of 2016. The default rate on those loans is also very low. The 2 recent securitisations have been expressly aimed at expanding the lending operations of Sancus and that has generated over £21m of third party funds. I understand that most of that cash has already been deployed, but we should get a better feel for what has happened later this year. If you strip out what the company terms non-sustainable earnings from the Sancus BMS figures, you get an average annual increase in revenues of over 25% over the last two financial years - page 25 of the AR. People will form their own views as to what the outcome will be this year.
james188
30/5/2017
23:08
Even before writing off bad investments and losses on loans, the company is operating at a loss as per the 2016 figures below: Profit before expenses £8.1m Operating Expenses £11m Loss on operations (£2.9m) (See page 60 of the 2016 annual accounts) How can this be turned around when the company is also losing its asset base through write downs of past bad investment decisions? Raising yet more expensive debt just accelerates the demise of this company. A cost saving drive to reduce expenses by £1m per annum is not going to resolve the situation. The most recent transaction was to sell a loan investment at a discount, in effect, realising yet more losses; because there was no other way to finance a loan redemption in March 2017. To me, that clearly is desperation because, over past years, they have issued ordinary shares and loan notes by the millions and ended up with a portfolio of loss making investments that cannot support the loans let alone the share capital. No good burying one’s head in the sand and talking in platitudes - it is an analysis of facts and figures that reveals the company’s future.
kenny
30/5/2017
19:42
Interesting post, Kenny and it might play out that way, but I sincerely hope not - and I speak as a very bruised continuing shareholder who continues to evaluate the position and the steps that the current management are taking very closely. As I have said in previous posts, I regard the possibility of a lowball takeout offer from Somerston as a very significant risk. Against that, there are still quite a few material intsti holders (I am guessing that most of the PIs have bailed out), so my thinking is that they are unlikely to bail out at a heavy loss unless they think that the company is continuing on a downwards trajectory. It is clear that the company did a number of quite dreadful deals in the second half of 2015 in particular (very poorly reported to shareholders at the time, which is a real bugbear for me) and there has been a clear out since then - for very good reason. We now have what I regard as a special situation, where the Sancus BMS arm is doing pretty well and expanding, but having to support the cash drag from the FinTech platforms, which are not cash generating. The market is effectively valuing the FinTech part of the business as zero to negative. As a lender base case, that is probably right, but there is obvious potential equity upside in a number of the platforms. If you think that management are (now)doing the right things, this is an interesting play. Forget the dividend for now, because there are better uses for the cash. Actually, the company should have cut the dividend sooner, in my view. Not least of the issues is that it takes a lot of time and effort to understand what is going on. I can quite see why lots of investors duck, but I am not one of them - and I would usually ditch any share with this sort of recent performance. We'll see.
james188
30/5/2017
16:06
I have not been a shareholder in GLIF for a little over 3 years and while it is sad to see investor’s lose money, I am surprised that there are still individual investor’s holding on. Losses that are continuing from trading and past investments mean there is unlikely to be another dividend paid anytime soon. The expense base also seems too high for a viable business to emerge. I think the end game has already been written – in common with what has occurred in many similar situations I have seen - where there is one controlling holder. The share price will continue to steadily deteriorate over the next few years and eventually the controlling shareholder will step in with an offer. I have no idea when that will happen or what the buyout price will be but, based upon figures I ran today, I am guessing that it will be at a single digit price e.g. 9p or lower. At that time, with the share price having reached a level below the buyout price and traded below that buyout price for some time; then holders will be glad to be put out of their misery. Of course, I could be proved wrong but the odds are heavily stacked against holders at the current share price. Note that I have no position in GLIF and have never shorted any share.
kenny
26/5/2017
07:55
Im not a holder but lurke. I always imagined they would be bust by now. I see thats not yet happened.
my retirement fund
26/5/2017
05:41
I take it some fellow GLIF unhappy investor,s.I thought all GLIF investors had sold out,and I was the only one left !!!
garycook
25/5/2017
23:33
Yea what would you like ? Down down, deeper and down, or Down and out?
my retirement fund
25/5/2017
21:30
could someone please change the name of this thread !!!
the monkster
25/5/2017
16:23
John Whittle Non-Ex Director buys 27,750 shares at 17.38.Nice to see,if only a small amount, a director buying at hopefully the bottom for the GLIF share price It just needs the rest of the Director,s to put their hand in their pockets and buy,to show condfident in the company.
garycook
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