Buy
Sell
Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Finsbury Food Group Plc LSE:FIF London Ordinary Share GB0009186429 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 70.00 69.00 71.00 70.00 70.00 70.00 25,766 08:00:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Food Producers 313.3 17.0 9.8 7.1 91

Finsbury Food Share Discussion Threads

Showing 3551 to 3574 of 4750 messages
Chat Pages: Latest  154  153  152  151  150  149  148  147  146  145  144  143  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
12/1/2013
10:30
What's the forecast eps now ? I sold out after rights . Looks like moving up with th market ?
s34icknote
10/1/2013
09:46
Still looking lively. Is the market finally starting to put a sensible rating on this one? It looks very much like there was some kind of tip or upgrade yesterday.
aleman
09/1/2013
16:02
Run of straight buying today. Have FIF been tipped somewhere? Is that the end of the 40p sellers so we can move on a little?
aleman
08/1/2013
13:46
wonder when the next TS will be out?
spaceparallax
07/1/2013
19:50
Grencore ROC 3.8% using Temple. Only looked briefly but similar play to FIF by the looks of it. And if last set of results are anything to judge looks very capable of turning around the debt and continuing to improve eps and roc as debt reduces. WC
woodcutter
07/1/2013
18:27
well i said i'd look at the ROC calcs and my results are interesting, at least i think so. i worked it out using a number of different criteria as specified by each of those listed below. Advfn gives ROC [PTP/average (total assets - creditors short)]*100 i guess they take the average as the sum of the position at the start and end of year and half it. Anyway according to advfn it's 9.1% Peter Temples magic numbers gives ROC (PBIT/Net capital employed)*100 similar as advfn. I punched in my own numbers from the last accounts and fwiw i arrived at ROC 12.2%. I did the advfn numbers and it clearly doesn't take account of the interest element when arriving at 9.1% Greenblatt gives ROC as PBIT/(Net Working Cap+Net fixed Assets) again i punched the numbers and arrived at ROC of 96%. Clearly an anomoly brought about by the use of fixed tangible assets. The loss of the intangible assets from the denominator having a significant impact on the ROC value. I suppose the question is would Greenblatt accept such an anomoly or add back the intangibles, in which case the ROC numbers are the same as Peter Temples. Greenblatt also goes to some length to explain adding back the depreciation values to the net working capital (something i didn't do for the sake of convenience as it wouldn't have made much difference to the end result). So i guess as Aleman has quite aptly noted this metric seems fraught with all sorts of nuances that have to be taken into consideration depending on type of industry etc. I guess the ROC at 12.2% seems most appropriate as the intangibles do have some value in my opinion (And is considerably higher than current gilt rates). One thing is clear as the short term debt is reduced both the EBIT will increase and the net capital employed will decrease driving the ROC higher. Woody
woodcutter
07/1/2013
11:15
free stock charts from uk.advfn.com
aleman
04/1/2013
18:03
jp100 i'm aware of the wizard series and have thought about picking up a few in the past, i'm an avid reader of investment and economics books and always interested in alternative ideas. Many of these books are written by traders/investors who operate in the US though and i'm not sure that it follows that the same strategy can be so easily applied in the UK, though i could be wrong. There has been much discussion about that transferability across markets in reference to greenblatt and his theories. I can only be persuaded by my own experience over the years and in line with Aleman i've tired to stay true to the cashflow principals, although not always and when having strayed on occassions i've had some success but a number of failures too. I'm a big fan of David Dreman but will read anything that's interesting so maybe i'll pick up a few now you've recommended them, thanks. Despite the large sale today a little more blue showing. I think we're on the edge now of a possible significant step forward. Woody
woodcutter
04/1/2013
15:15
woodcutter, there is an interesting interview with Greenblatt in Hedge Fund Market Wizards by Jack D Schwager I recommend all of Schwager's Market Wizard books to anyone with any interest in investing
jpjp100
04/1/2013
12:31
yes i too have always mainly considered cashflow/share against eps i like to see it at least comparable. And there's no doubt from further reading i've done ROC can be very misleading and it's clear that it very much depends on the type of business you are analysing, as you noted. Higher gearing may well indicate that the business assets are undervalued and in many cases good cashflow can support such gearing. I guess also assets can equally overvalued and any significant debt is suspect to movement in interest rates impacting eps. So all-in-all i figure you're right lots of deeper analysis required if using this metric. I like your buffet analogy, i'll continue with cashflow, always interesting to look at alternative methods though. I see we're on the move again today. Woody
woodcutter
03/1/2013
17:09
Always bear in mind that different industries suit different metrics and it pays to stick to what you understand so generalising is dangerous. For most cases I take headline profit/earnings with a pinch of salt. They are sometimes misleading and can be manipulated. It can take a lot of adjustment to get to the underlying trend and you sometimes can't get there. Enterprize values can throw up odd results. Some companies need debt to gear up fairly steady cashflows to generate earnings growth. (Utilities and food companies.) Comparing EVs of steady companies which can sustain more debt and those with volatile earnings that can't will generate anomolies. The fear of debt since the recession for good cash generators is irrational. It will pass. Return on capital may just indicate a company is under or over capitalised, I would not trust this without a lot of adjustment, either. Could be a lot involved and might get it wrong. I work mostly off cashflow trends, which I attempt to adjust myself. Cashflows are very hard to manipulate and tend to be more representative of the underlying trend if you learn how to adjust them for changes in working capital and one-offs. It's relatively simple once you get the hang of it and, in my experience, rings alarm bells on sickening companies far more than earnings. Lots of profitable companies have gone bust through getting too much cash tied up in illiquid assets. All methods have merits but it's debatable if they are all worth the time involved, particularly the obscure technical ones. You can only spread yourself so thinly. You need to learn their strengths and weaknesses. I like this saying (which I think was attributed to Buffett?): Turnover is vanity, profit is sanity, cashflow is king.
aleman
03/1/2013
16:09
boff i have a close friend who has been building stake for some time on past comments from myself. His stake is considerably larger than mine now. He's had a lot of experience in running businesses and he believes it's very much a take over target, indeed he thinks the directors are behaving very much in a manner that would suggest so. How you define that i'm not sure but that is his feeling about it. I don't mind if he's right as long as it's at a good take out price. I have just finished reading the little book that beats the market....joel greenblatt (i guess i'm an avid reader of this kind of stuff) and it's interesting to note his analysis principally valuing companies on two relatively simple metrics; earnings yield and return on capital. I think EY is something that Aleman uses quite frequently (forgive me Aleman if i've got that wrong) from past analysis. I think i've mentioned this before but using EBIT/EV for earnings yield does permit better comparisons of differing businesses as it takes account of debt and different tax rates. On ROC he uses EBIT/(Net working Capital + Net fixed assets) Without wishing to embarass myself this ROC method isn't something i've ever considered. I thought it might be interesting to have a look through the advfn filters and see what came out but it doesn't look like they use the same formula. Aleman/Boff, have you used this crieria before and do you know of any websites where it might be possible to test such a filter. When i get a minute will look at how it works for fif. Got to put the xmas decorations in the loft, wife on my back:-)) Woody
woodcutter
03/1/2013
14:31
This could be the watershed year for Finsbury. I predict continued sales growth, restoration of dividend and possibly suitors sniffing.
boffster
03/1/2013
14:23
About time. The food company I recently compared FIF to as similar in many respects, GNC, keeps going up. FIF has been getting relatively cheaper.
aleman
03/1/2013
14:09
happy new year to all our readers. Did i see a little blue today:-))
woodcutter
22/12/2012
13:10
Irrespective of the reason I am happy to be sitting on a large profit. Paying down the debt is the correct priority at present, along with opportunistic bolt on acquisitions. It will be a couple of years yet before we start to see good dividends and that will further boost the share price. On a long term view FIF is still very undervalued.
this_is_me
18/12/2012
16:49
Other food manufacturers shares are up around 20% in H2 (despite many of them having debt similar to FIF and bigger pensions deficits). FIF was undervalued compared to them when I did comparisons a few months back so should be even more so, now: free stock charts from uk.advfn.com One specific company I compared that made FIF look cheap was Greencore. I thought they made FIF look thumpingly undervalued, with targets of perhaps 50p on earnings and 70p on cashflows to get similar ratings. You can add another 5-10% after GNC hit another new high today: THere is talk that government bond holders are selling out of weak yields and crystallising capital gains to buy stodgier equities where yields are higher. I reckon this is driving up the food sector. FIF is beginning to look like it has done no better than any other foody. It should really be much higher.
aleman
13/12/2012
10:22
Boff - The share price more than doubled in 4 months. A pull-back to slightly less than doubled is not languishing. A bit of profit taking was to be expected. Don't panic. The p/e is only 5 and they're cheaper on cashflow. Investors Chronicle and the like won't write any more articles without further news. When they do, buyers will return. Patience!
aleman
12/12/2012
16:09
time will tell.
spaceparallax
12/12/2012
11:17
Its disappointing to see the share price languishing after the mood at the AGM was much more upbeat than last year.
boffster
09/12/2012
10:56
Been buying TCG all this week but that's off topic. I think what swayed me was reading up more and more about RGD. I sold out of RGD a year or so ago when I discovered a wealth of stuff about P.Totte, the charachter running the co. Go into looking at what looks like a mess there to me again since their last results. He was involved with Interlink Foods and Finsbury. He was also involved with Hill Station. I'm not saying anything involving him has anything to do with FIF now but it just seems the whole AIM food sector is rife with murky fund raising and accounting malarky or some other scam, every one I've been in seems to have been iffy. I bought Lees Foods which seemded a decent one and had that stolen off of me by a bunch of greedy directors at a hideously low price. Until AIM cleans up it's ways I'm sticking to being fussy. I have a rule that I try to stick too in focusing only on AIM if they are UK based and divi payers. Started a thread regarding that (ticker AIM). I occasionally punt into an AIM stock that doesn't fit these rules still but try to remain aware that it's not of the required class. The recent fundraising and the food sector and the 'no divi' all just started to say FIF looked like they were going to be hard work at best to me so have moved to pastures new. Probably just me being over cautious or fickle as usual :-) CR
cockneyrebel
09/12/2012
10:25
But then TCG has done rather well this week...and CR did say he had added...which could have been Monday etc
badtime
08/12/2012
23:53
HFD is hardly cheap despite the yield. TCG might be a good recovery play if it doesn't go bust.
this_is_me
08/12/2012
13:00
Let my FIF go this week to buy more HFD and TCG. FIF still looks cheap, just think there's swifter plays about in this mkt. CR
cockneyrebel
Chat Pages: Latest  154  153  152  151  150  149  148  147  146  145  144  143  Older
ADVFN Advertorial
Your Recent History
LSE
FIF
Finsbury F..
Register now to watch these stocks streaming on the ADVFN Monitor.

Monitor lets you view up to 110 of your favourite stocks at once and is completely free to use.

By accessing the services available at ADVFN you are agreeing to be bound by ADVFN's Terms & Conditions

P: V: D:20220521 01:45:59