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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Fidelity China Special Situations Plc LSE:FCSS London Ordinary Share GB00B62Z3C74 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 411.50 412.00 412.50 - 0.00 00:00:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 33.0 25.2 4.5 91.2 2,121

Fidelity China Special S... Share Discussion Threads

Showing 476 to 500 of 950 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
18/6/2011
11:50
M S-W prefers Japan as a way to play the China growth story; I must say I'm inclined to agree, and the Japanese are less likely to riot on the streets: One way of checking the confidence levels of investors, at least in the UK, might be to look at the share price of the Fidelity China Special Situations Fund. I wasn't particularly complimentary about this at its launch. But most other people loved it and the shares immediately moved to trade at a large premium to the fund's net asset value. No more. This week they have been trading at a slight discount. Perhaps the shift away from the idea that emerging markets are worth a premium is beginning to get going – something that might be yet another reason, if you must be in equities, to stick to developed markets for now. Currently, the price-to-book ratio for the MSCI Asia excluding Japan index is around 1.83 times. For the developed world MSCI World index it is slightly less at 1.74 times. Finally, it might be worth noting something else about the performance of the Fidelity China Special Situations fund. If you had bought into it back in April 2010 at 100p a share, you'd be down more than 5 per cent on the deal today. If, instead, you had bought the Baillie Gifford Japan Trust at the same time, you'd be up around 2 per cent. And, right now, the price to book ratio of the Japanese market is 0.97 times. I know which I'd rather hold. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/55e75186-9839-11e0-ae45-00144feab49a.html#ixzz1PcxeeeGW
jonwig
18/6/2011
11:44
Have to say I could be tempted but suspect that the discount to NAV will widen in the short term. If we see a 10% discount to NAV then I could see myself on board
salpara111
17/6/2011
12:37
Sold out holdings of all other UK plc (that are trading within UK) Filled my boots with a hopefull China upturn.
whizzy1
17/6/2011
12:37
I have just put my dosh where my mouth is, im thinking oversold. 5 grand in yesterday. In for another 20 grand today.
whizzy1
17/6/2011
08:27
Bolton's flagship China fund suffers By Robert Cookson in Hong Kong FT Published: June 16 2011 22:16 | Last updated: June 16 2011 22:16 Anthony Bolton: shares in the feted fund manager's China Special Situations fund have dropped 20 per cent   Anthony Bolton, the feted fund manager at Fidelity International, has suffered a stumble with the poor performance of his new flagship China fund this year. Mr Bolton's China Special Situations fund raised £460m ($743m) when it launched with much fanfare on the London Stock Exchange last April. But in the year to date, shares in the fund have dropped 20 per cent, a much sharper fall than the broader Shanghai and Hong Kong markets. Over the same time, the net asset value of the fund dropped 14.4 per cent. For the first time since May 2010, the share price of the fund dipped below its net asset value – a phenomenon that suggests a dip in investor confidence in Mr Bolton's ability to produce the consistent double-digit returns that have been the hallmark of his 30-year investing career. Chinese stocks listed on stock exchanges across the world, including Hong Kong, London and New York, have declined this year due to worries about corporate governance problems and concern that the Chinese economy is slowing while inflation remains stubbornly high. In the year to date, the Shanghai Composite index has fallen 5.12 per cent while the Hang Seng index in Hong Kong has dropped 4.7 per cent. Shares in Mr Bolton's fund closed at 94p on Thursday, down 6 per cent from the price of 100p at which investors bought shares in its initial public offering. Previously, the fund traded at a premium over its net assets that went as high as 13 per cent last November, a price investors were willing to pay for Mr Bolton's record of market-beating returns. Mr Bolton, who does not speak Mandarin but works with a team of experienced locals, was unavailable for comment on Thursday. His fund is due to release its annual results next week, with details of its holdings and Mr Bolton's strategy for the future. In the fund's latest statement for the month of April, Mr Bolton said: "China is not without risks but I continue to believe that the case for investing is compelling." In an interview last week with UK investment website Motley Fool, Mr Bolton said he was "very disappointed" with the fund's recent performance. Almost half of his portfolio is invested in Hong Kong-listed shares, with the remainder in Chinese companies listed in Shanghai, New York and elsewhere. Before moving to Hong Kong last year, Mr Bolton wowed investors during his 28 years at Fidelity's flagship London-based Special Situations fund by delivering an annualised return of 19.5 per cent. Fidelity International declined to comment.
spob
17/6/2011
08:09
Yes but he is a seasoned fund manager in UK special situations and Europe. Rather different than China I would suspect.
skidaddle
17/6/2011
07:45
This is what ii are writing about FCSS today; Chart of the day: Going against the trend in FCSS? Fears of a Chinese hard landing has sent the Fidelity China SS fund plumbing new depths. Yesterday, the instrument dropped below its June 2010 lows for the first time. The question for now is: Should one sell? Well, if one is confident that the Chinese government can manage the economy well, then no. Moreover, FCSS's decline is oversold and susceptible to a rebound. Meanwhile, it is also worth noting the FCSS has a seasoned fund manager - the legendary Anothy Bolton - in charge. Therefore, a long-term believer in the Chinese economy should use the recent drop to buy more.
a1samu
17/6/2011
07:28
This is the article: Bolton's flagship China fund suffers By Robert Cookson in Hong Kong Published: June 16 2011 22:16 | Last updated: June 16 2011 22:16 Anthony Bolton: shares in the feted fund manager's China Special Situations fund have dropped 20 per cent   Anthony Bolton, the feted fund manager at Fidelity International, has suffered a stumble with the poor performance of his new flagship China fund this year. Mr Bolton's China Special Situations fund raised £460m ($743m) when it launched with much fanfare on the London Stock Exchange last April. But in the year to date, shares in the fund have dropped 20 per cent, a much sharper fall than the broader Shanghai and Hong Kong markets. Over the same time, the net asset value of the fund dropped 14.4 per cent. For the first time since May 2010, the share price of the fund dipped below its net asset value – a phenomenon that suggests a dip in investor confidence in Mr Bolton's ability to produce the consistent double-digit returns that have been the hallmark of his 30-year investing career. Chinese stocks listed on stock exchanges across the world, including Hong Kong, London and New York, have declined this year due to worries about corporate governance problems and concern that the Chinese economy is slowing while inflation remains stubbornly high. In the year to date, the Shanghai Composite index has fallen 5.12 per cent while the Hang Seng index in Hong Kong has dropped 4.7 per cent. Shares in Mr Bolton's fund closed at 94p on Thursday, down 6 per cent from the price of 100p at which investors bought shares in its initial public offering. Previously, the fund traded at a premium over its net assets that went as high as 13 per cent last November, a price investors were willing to pay for Mr Bolton's record of market-beating returns. Mr Bolton, who does not speak Mandarin but works with a team of experienced locals, was unavailable for comment on Thursday. His fund is due to release its annual results next week, with details of its holdings and Mr Bolton's strategy for the future. In the fund's latest statement for the month of April, Mr Bolton said: "China is not without risks but I continue to believe that the case for investing is compelling." In an interview last week with UK investment website Motley Fool, Mr Bolton said he was "very disappointed" with the fund's recent performance. Almost half of his portfolio is invested in Hong Kong-listed shares, with the remainder in Chinese companies listed in Shanghai, New York and elsewhere. Before moving to Hong Kong last year, Mr Bolton wowed investors during his 28 years at Fidelity's flagship London-based Special Situations fund by delivering an annualised return of 19.5 per cent. Fidelity International declined to comment.
roman2325
17/6/2011
07:01
I read the above article on my Blackberry but FT website will not allow me to read it Daft Anyhow says Boltons Fidelity fund down 20% on the year No shortage of suckers in the investing world
spob
17/6/2011
06:52
pump and dump glad i stayed clear of the hype
spob
17/6/2011
05:32
Article in FT today (need registration): http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/0e835d18-9847-11e0-ae45-00144feab49a.html?ftcamp=crm/email/2011617/nbe/AlphavilleLondon/product#axzz1PQk9YH00
jonwig
16/6/2011
20:52
One thing i did learn from 2008/9 was that markets rise and fall together as the same investors are in all of them. I also remember that China led the global stck markets up in early 2009. So what they are telling us now is GET THE HELL OUT !! I`m in the lifeboat with my bag of cash.
sicall
16/6/2011
16:18
Back to basics, never mind chart analysis, level 2 & what may or may not be happening to the dollar/euro etc, buy low sell high & that's it.
whizzy1
16/6/2011
16:06
folks were happy to pay a premium here a week or so back, now at the discount as u say; if one is still believing in the China story, i quite fancy this myself.
value viper
16/6/2011
16:03
I think the way to play this might be via the discount - now around 4% ... wasn't it a premium in the early days? The market will surely overshoot on the discount percent: maybe 10% worth a close look, 15% buy a few, 20% you're feeling lucky.
jonwig
16/6/2011
15:42
In @ 92.77, any drop tomorrow & I shall fill my boots.
whizzy1
16/6/2011
12:32
Re-entry ? I just got out. There seems to be no reason to ever get back in.
tyranosaurus
16/6/2011
09:17
Still watching and looking for a re-entry point. Stiil not tempted yet !
masurenguy
16/6/2011
09:13
So, who benefitted most from the share dilution?
atflores
15/6/2011
19:38
How Anthony Bolton Destroyed The Market Fidelity China Special Situations (LSE: FCSS), the biggest investment trust launch of 2010, and in fact the biggest such launch for 16 years. http://www.fool.co.uk/news/investing/2011/06/14/how-bolton-destroyed-the-market.aspx?source=ufwflwlnk0000001
masurenguy
15/6/2011
11:37
There lies your reason why every institution ducked it
roman2325
14/6/2011
16:45
Has Anthony Bolton lost his touch ?? One year in China and nothing to show for it. Me thinks he should get a kick up the backside to either get this performing or retire.
tyranosaurus
13/6/2011
17:03
Same here, I'd be happy to catch the knife @mid 80's or low 90's
whizzy1
13/6/2011
14:55
Took profits and sold half my original holding in September and then the balance early in January. Now looking for a suitable re-entry point again.
masurenguy
10/6/2011
13:40
China "B" shares took a proper drubbing overnight, but I think the focus will be more on HKG and Shanghai A - Interesting performance vs FXC (FTSE XINHUA tracker) which has been fairly choppy over the last few months. These loo to be a proper retail punter's share with high charges, high hype, and no discount to NAV. There must be better out there, check trustnet.
little beaker
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