Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Dart Group LSE:DTG London Ordinary Share GB00B1722W11 ORD 1.25P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -3.50p -0.44% 790.50p 791.50p 793.50p 799.50p 785.50p 796.00p 220,107 16:35:27
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Travel & Leisure 1,729.3 90.1 51.8 15.3 1,174.35

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Date Time Title Posts
22/2/201815:51*** Dart Group ***3,731
21/8/201419:39dtg charts75
16/4/201317:57Dart Group : Jets and Logistics turnaround opportunity ?1,185
11/10/200812:21Dart group dark horse or cart horse?416
31/5/200521:36Dart Group charts and news 20053

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Dart Group (DTG) Most Recent Trades

Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
2018-02-23 16:53:14792.725,51343,702.55O
2018-02-23 16:52:57792.371,2409,825.35O
2018-02-23 16:51:53791.971,70013,463.46O
2018-02-23 16:45:02793.333,38426,846.24O
2018-02-23 16:35:27790.5021,954173,546.37UT
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Dart Group (DTG) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
23/2/2018
08:20
Dart Group Daily Update: Dart Group is listed in the Travel & Leisure sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker DTG. The last closing price for Dart Group was 794p.
Dart Group has a 4 week average price of 630.50p and a 12 week average price of 630.50p.
The 1 year high share price is 807p while the 1 year low share price is currently 484.75p.
There are currently 148,558,464 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 740,189 shares. The market capitalisation of Dart Group is £1,174,354,657.92.
07/2/2018
15:43
valhamos: T If you finally bought (closed your short or whatever) in April 2016 after months of share price increases you only have yourself to blame, but I guess that's the problem when you concentrate on price movements / trends rather than thinking more about business performance and profitability. Choose another month other than April 2016 and your argument falls apart so another example of bias in your data. The UK CAPE ratio at the end of 2017 was 18.6 hTtp://shiller.barclays.com/SM/12/en/indices/static/historic-ratios.app perhaps you referring to the US where it was 30.9 at the end of 2017. Note it was higher than that for the 3 years 1997 to 1999 before the 2000 bear market, so your timing may be out by 3 years - who knows, but what you predict is not solely relevant to DTG so why do you only post your market predictions here?
29/1/2018
20:43
tresham: A few reasons why I might have sold my shares in Dart Group since April 2016: 1. The shares had increased seven fold over five years. Possibly unbalancing my portfolio. 2. Capital Gains Tax reduced to 20% that April., Many sellers 16-17 and 17-18 tax year 3. Massive expansion causing some consternation, (+30 planes and 3 new bases). 4. Brexit induced irrational selling in 2016 5. Seeing share price dive in 2016 to £3.50 was a gut wrenching ordeal and not pleasant. 6. Very high growth: 40% increase in sales, low current PE = 8.5. Too good to be true? 7. Logic goes someone knows something I don’t know; therefore suspicious. 8. Some people including Mr Market say Sell or Hold; IC? 9. What goes up must come down. Mean reversion 10. No legacy issues, pensions and worthless intangibles. Now I’m getting illogical! I am a buyer. I have no doubt they will remain volatile and I would only like to see the share price drop in order to buy more. The shares are a bargain. Tresham
27/1/2018
15:24
valhamos: Happy to have a discussion of the merits or otherwise of EZJ,RYA and TUI compared with DTG, but looking at their comparative share price performance serves no useful purpose: it is backward looking and the share graphs do not reveal anything about the business or how it will perform in the future. However if you spend time considering a company whether it has provided decent returns on equity and growth in profits along with the plausibility of its stated strategy in the context of the economics of the wider industry you MAY (as the economics of a company and managerial performance usually does not change over night) get some insight into future direction and performance. We should be forward looking with data that can help not looking backwards at share graphs that can't. So a lot of the discussion here about share performance comparisons seems to completely miss the point.
25/1/2018
15:44
tongosti: TigerI agree that only a meaningful (and a very big one at that) surprise (over existing expectations) can propel the share price higher. Absent that, one can't see how why DTG should charge higher from here. Worth bearing in mind it's two years DTG has not advanced an inch (even in the face of improving trading ops since). And this has always been my point: expectations are already sky high and the business needs to play catch up constantly with them if the share price is to reflect that.
13/10/2017
10:45
tongosti: Sure - growth costs and the relevant question here is how much? Hopefully, upcoming trading statements will shed much light on this. As for growth costs causing share price fall, you maybe right but then maybe not. in truth no one really knows why exactly (key word here!) the market does what it does. example: when the DTG announced expansion plans two years back the share price price went much higher (450 to 700) even though the market should have been aware of future cost of expansion. It didn't however and it helps make the point that immediate perceptions (at least in the shorter term) are far stronger drivers of share price performance than any balanced and logical hypothesis.
30/8/2017
06:28
castleford tiger: Thanks for that - no doubt your analysis of DTG has paid off in spades for you historically. You have been a major beneficiary having timed your entry perfectly in the low teens 10 years back. I agree that this was luck but the business model was always one that I supported being the first to go at it on line without the costs of high street shops. You do realise though the company could have gone bust in 2008 (hypothetical scenario would be had governments stopped short of bailing out banks) in which case your stake would have vaporised and your classic value play turned to dust. Well that would of meant a total collapse of the UK PLC not just DART who to be fair had no debt even at this stage. So in this sense you have also been lucky (necessary for all of us in life as well as in this game I hear you say). Point being 9 out of 10 companies collapsing 90% in price or more have historically gone bust (lots of literature on the subject - keyword "value trap": most stuff on the cheap is so for a good reason). Buffett refers to it as the cigar butt approach. There are outside factors that can cause this without the business being in danger of going under. One is panic in the market and a classic sell off ignoring the true value of a business. You have happened to pick up the one that has been a success. Kudos. Had I retained my 2.7% of DART that I held through to today......the stake would have been over 20 m gross but of course I took chunks out at double/treble etc. Future could be very different though. I also agree with you that DTG will be around and probably quite successful 5 to 10 years from now. However, I wouldn't confuse underlying business with the share price (which makes or loses me money). No but this is where we differ. I look for a business the market has wrongly valued and wait for a correction. Question is: would you justify your play if the share price collapses (it has done so before hasn't it) by another 90% if a major bear market comes roaring tomorrow? I would be buying whatever I could if all things were as they are now. Very probably you will tolerate all your historical gains (because you do expect the market to come back to its sense in the indeterminate future) being vaporised but I wouldn't. See my note above about taking money off the table as the price increased. If anything I am too early taking money back. I'd rather avoid losses during a bear market (and even go short if possible) and wait for a better entry on the long side (happy with the inevitable trade offs my approach entails) at a later stage. Agree but I don't short I just stay out. Hence my paranoid focus on the good old trend being my best friend concept. To me fundamental analysis is very important but it is just a departure point. Making sure you you never ever suffer serious drawdowns is an entirely different ball game. If we wake up tomorrow and TRUMP has Nuked North Korea then expect 25% off markets but is DART worth less? Of course not. To me anything more than 15% drawdown is intolerable, let alone 40% or more. See above that can happen in a blink of an eye. But that's me. Thanks for your comments anyways - you're one of the few posters I respect on this board.
29/8/2017
18:42
tongosti: Thanks for that - no doubt your analysis of DTG has paid off in spades for you historically. You have been a major beneficiary having timed your entry perfectly in the low teens 10 years back. You do realise though the company could have gone bust in 2008 (hypothetical scenario would be had governments stopped short of bailing out banks) in which case your stake would have vaporised and your classic value play turned to dust. So in this sense you have also been lucky (necessary for all of us in life as well as in this game I hear you say). Point being 9 out of 10 companies collapsing 90% in price or more have historically gone bust (lots of literature on the subject - keyword "value trap": most stuff on the cheap is so for a good reason). Buffett refers to it as the cigar butt approach. You have happened to pick up the one that has been a success. Kudos. Future could be very different though. I also agree with you that DTG will be around and probably quite successful 5 to 10 years from now. However, I wouldn't confuse underlying business with the share price (which makes or loses me money). Question is: would you justify your play if the share price collapses (it has done so before hasn't it) by another 90% if a major bear market comes roaring tomorrow? Very probably you will tolerate all your historical gains (because you do expect the market to come back to its sense in the indeterminate future) being vaporised but I wouldn't. I'd rather avoid losses during a bear market (and even go short if possible) and wait for a better entry on the long side (happy with the inevitable trade offs my approach entails) at a later stage. Hence my paranoid focus on the good old trend being my best friend concept. To me fundamental analysis is very important but it is just a departure point. Making sure you you never ever suffer serious drawdowns is an entirely different ball game. To me anything more than 15% drawdown is intolerable, let alone 40% or more.But that's me. Thanks for your comments anyways - you're one of the few posters I respect on this board.
29/8/2017
16:19
tongosti: Tiger As I have mentioned here before, the bullish case sounds good - on paper - and I do understand why this company has so many fans who use fundamental analysis as their one and only guide in selecting individual investments. In effect, what you (and many others) believe in is that fundamentals help determine share prices in the longer term and that's it. I also believe that but this is only half the story. I choose to go a step further in my analysis in that I also happen to believe that share prices also help (not always, obviously) reveal (well in advance) a lot of information about (future) fundamentals. A falling share price sometimes (key word!) precedes a deterioration in fundamentals themselves. Not my theory, but Soros's. DTG being 40% down from all time highs with the share price refusing to reflect the widely perceived "stellar" fundamentals speaks volumes to me. In the off chance you want to kill some time off - here's from the horse's mouth directly: hxxps://macro-ops.com/understanding-george-soross-theory-of-reflexivity-in-markets/
01/8/2017
12:06
tongosti: Tiger Appreciate your view as that's what makes a market after all. I don't have fixed targets (either long or short) but simply try to ride the wave for as long as I can. 360 is simply some sort of a generic reference point (which I use to have a preliminary idea on risk/reward profile). RE your rationale - compelling as they sound on paper the market has already discounted such info. Big time. Only a major, major positive surprise can propel much higher the share price from current levels (example: >50% not 45% growth - an extremely challenging task for any business, if you ask me). The bar is simply unbelievably high. Beg to differ but no - going short at this stage is not crazy at all at this stage. On the contrary. Finally, a market that fails to move north (or south) on seemingly bullish (bearish) fundamentals is a very unhealthy (resilient) one. It's one of the defining features of any market throughout history. DTG is exactly at such a juncture now. Share price has completely failed to make headways at a time of: - Apparently very cheap valuations - Historical highs produced in the wider market - No share price can sustain a parabolic ascent for ever (long term chart for DTG looks scary to anyone who have seen the same old film repeat over and over again) Naturally, I can be totally wrong and that's why I limit my risk levels at the time I open a position. Helps me sleep better!
28/7/2017
16:15
tongosti: AlphaCertainly contrarian on prevailing sentiment grounds. Re momentum - yes I always aim being in sync with the market. Does it make you a consensus player by definition? Matter of perspective really. Example: suppose share price of ABC has collapsed from 100p to 5p over last 12 months. Further, suppose share price has turned North very recently and is priced at 10p. From a longer term perspective this it still a share being 90% down from all time highs and if one is long at this stage is considered a true contrarian. However, being long at a time when share price is 100% up from 5p lows makes one a consensus player (which is what you really meant earlier and which obviously is always correct in hindsight after one observes historical price action). Again, it's s matter of perspective
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