User Notice: The site will be occasionally unavailable due to scheduled maintenance this weekend. Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience.

Buy
Sell
Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Chamberlin Plc LSE:CMH London Ordinary Share GB0001870228 ORD 0.1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -0.95 -6.91% 12.80 12.00 13.50 14.25 12.50 13.75 1,128,350 16:35:12
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Industrial Engineering 26.1 -2.3 -18.7 - 9

Chamberlin Share Discussion Threads

Showing 651 to 671 of 875 messages
Chat Pages: 35  34  33  32  31  30  29  28  27  26  25  24  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
18/10/2017
09:47
At the Annual General Meeting to be held on 20 July 2017 (see the Notice of Annual General Meeting on pages 71 to 73), all of the directors will retire and, being eligible, offer themselves for re-election. So how many of you attended the Agm and questioned the remuneration policy or indeed actively questioned any of the policies or voted against the re-appointment of board members if unhappy at what is happening to the company ? How many of the institutions voted against and did they approve remuneration ? It is no use just complaining here. I attended an Agm yesterday where remuneration was equally bad as a percentage of profits and market cap and I told directors it should be reduced or they should resign as the pay was upper quartile and performance lower quartile in their sector. ShareSoc can help with campaigns but sitting here and moaning will do nothing !
davidosh
18/10/2017
08:54
The best outcome ( for the company and employees - not the shareholders )would be for a share issue to take out the pension fund and the debt so they can do something with the company. That’s probably 15m plus. Regretfully there’s no value to existing or future shareholders from that because the underlying businesses aren’t worth anywhere near 15m.
2realist
18/10/2017
08:30
Falling knife - stay out. Massive pension deficit and too much bank debt. Lenders likely to be knockning on the door.
baner
18/10/2017
08:15
Yea not just competent person but a competent person on a sensible salary
my retirement fund
18/10/2017
07:58
We should be very close to a highly dilutive Placing of new equity now. Lenders are quickly losing their patience with this grossly overpaid management team. Significant increase in turnover with no profits = severe cash outflow. Chamberlin is now in a dangerous situation financially. BOD should resign and make room for competent person in order to give lenders and shareholders a bit of comfort. If possible.
baner
18/10/2017
07:54
I'm sure there will be less polite comments.
paleje
18/10/2017
07:47
It looks as though these overpaid executive directors could not get drunk in a brewery to put it politely.
kneecaps2
16/10/2017
09:34
Bank facilities can be withdrawn ”overnightR21; in most cases - and should absolutely not be regarded as ”buffert cash”. The pension trust is so deep in the red that the deficit should be regarded as a bona fide debt, not only a provision. On that basis the gearing at Chamberlin is nothing but disastrous and it is highly likely that the banks will require the company to raise new equity and/or sell off the small businesses they own. With management and BOD milking this minnow for horrendous remuneration, it is unlikely they will sell subsidiaries but rather go for a highly diluting Placing of new shares - sub-50p no doubt.
baner
16/10/2017
09:34
Bank facilities can be withdrawn ”overnightR21; in most cases - and should absolutely not be regarded as ”buffert cash”. The pension trust is so deep in the red that the deficit should be regarded as a bona fide debt, not only a provision. On that basis the gearing at Chamberlin is nothing but disastrous and it is highly likely that the banks will require the company to raise new equity and/or sell off the small businesses they own. With management and BOD milking this minnow for horrendous remuneration, it is unlikely they will sell subsidiaries but rather go for a highly diluting Placing of new shares - sub-50p no doubt.
baner
14/10/2017
13:05
WTO tariffs on car components 2.5-4.5% so easily covered by the sterling plunge in the event of car crash Brexit.In any event I think the penny is starting to drop even with the leavers (excepting the swivel eyed nutters) what's actually involved in a no deal scenario. If I was a gambling man I'd say Article 50 revoke more likely than Cliff Edge Brexit. May has already guaranteed manufacturers a 2 year transition, who's she trying to kid with this no deal non bluff?
cockerhoop
14/10/2017
12:41
If that proves the case it should lift in theory underlying founder profits from 1.2 to 1.5 million.However surley the issue would be export tarrifs to the EU. It's looking increasingly likely there will be no trade deal, the UK can't even agree to it's future obligations let alone free movement of people. Those whom imagine a trade deal are on thin ice imo.Would Chamberlain be in a posistion to relocate it's foundary operations to mainland Europe I wonder?
my retirement fund
13/10/2017
20:32
Demand for turbo housings is forecast to rise during each of the next 5 years. Fully electric cars wont be mainstream for at least another decade as the charging infrastructure wont be in place. Hybrid is the immediate future and every hybrid will have at least one turbo fitted. CMH have a full order book and are looking at 30% increase in volumes next year together with the new machine shop contributing significantly to margins. The operation will soon benefit from the massive investment seen recently as well as restructuring to focus on core activities.The future prospects for this business have never been better. Maybe the negative dinosaurs on here will eat their words then :)
kwackerh2
07/10/2017
19:46
Technological change was at the back of my mind in my earlier posts.What I am suggesting is if the cannot turn a profit at the peak of turbo demand they dont have much hope as the market tails off in the coming years.Perhaps this is why the directors have no skin in the game.
my retirement fund
07/10/2017
15:28
Restructuring is a solution not a risk except of course to current shareholders in an over valued company. It is inevitable that a restructuring should be planned to re position a group that’s over borrowed has a pension deficit has an overpaid board and a foundry business with long term structural problems. But the board who are not shareholders will kid you along as they get their reward through excessive remuneration.
2realist
07/10/2017
15:15
It wasn't supposed to impress you 2realist it was intended to demostrate they aren't tight against any bank related pressure so the risk of restructuring is not current. I'd agree technological change is the biggest threat Rhomboid.
cockerhoop
07/10/2017
14:53
I think the biggest threat here is the pace of technology change leaving them exposed, electric vehicles in short don’t need turbos, I’d love to know how long it’ll be before this leaves them short of customers
rhomboid
07/10/2017
14:23
Total committed bank facilities available to the Group at the year end was £10.6m (2016: £8.0m), of which £6.8m (2016: £3.2m) was drawn.
cockerhoop
07/10/2017
10:44
Thank you Baner. First sensible post about this company. It needs massive restructuring and breaking up. That won’t happen because the directors like being Plc directors. Why ? Plc’s are removed from their shareholders so they can be paid far more than they would if the owners were Private Equity or any private owners. So they’re not going to restructure it are they ! And they’ve got no investment of their own in the company because they know it is a basket case. But being a Plc Director is a tick on the CV and a status thing with more cash than the company can afford and they deserve.
2realist
06/10/2017
13:50
falling knife - to be avoided. needs financial restructuring = dilution. next stop 50p.
baner
05/10/2017
19:57
Chamberlin has suffered from years of poor management who ran it like a club for their mates and the current B.O.D has inherited that. The tide has turned and the years of stagnation have passed. The hard decisions like closing Leicester and setting up a state of the art machining facility cost money and significant investments such as hydride cleaning facility and melting plant investments have required major expenditure recently. Manufacturing industry in the UK has a rich heritage of famous names that are now housing estates or retail parks as a result of weak management with no vision or long term plan who took the rewards and gave little in return. I agree that its been a poor stock to hold and I speak from experience. It used to provide a reasonable dividend but thats a distant memory now. I know the business and the industry well and I know CMH is now being driven forward at a rapid rate by people who have a CV thats as thick as a phone book instead of the old school tie brigade that paid a dividend because they had a shed load of shares and so did their mates.
kwackerh2
05/10/2017
08:13
The current management is light years in front of the previous incumbents, whose strategy ran the business into the ground. They have sorted out the production side, but the balance sheet does not make pretty reading. This does place a drag on the share price, and the ability to return to the dividend list in the near term. The potential is there for a turn round. Look at the list of disclosable shareholdings.
redartbmud
Chat Pages: 35  34  33  32  31  30  29  28  27  26  25  24  Older
ADVFN Advertorial
Your Recent History
LSE
CMH
Chamberlin
Register now to watch these stocks streaming on the ADVFN Monitor.

Monitor lets you view up to 110 of your favourite stocks at once and is completely free to use.

By accessing the services available at ADVFN you are agreeing to be bound by ADVFN's Terms & Conditions

P: V: D:20210507 23:34:24