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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Capital Gearing Trust Plc LSE:CGT London Ordinary Share GB0001738615 ORD 25P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 4,530.00 4,520.00 4,540.00 4,540.00 4,520.00 4,520.00 18,105 14:48:01
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 7.8 6.4 59.1 76.6 552

Capital Gearing Share Discussion Threads

Showing 8126 to 8147 of 8325 messages
Chat Pages: 333  332  331  330  329  328  327  326  325  324  323  322  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
12/1/2018
19:04
geordy2, I have a gain in the current tax year which is less than £5000. I also have a carried forward loss from a previous year of £7000. Will this years gain be offset against the previous loss, ... No. Same-year losses have to be offset against gains all the way down to the remaining gains being zero, but losses brought forward from previous tax years only have to be offset against gains until the remaining gains are down to the CGT allowance. (Or in both cases, until the losses concerned have run out, of course.) ... and do I even need to show the c/f loss or save it for next year when hopefully my gain will be in excess of the CGT allowance. Technically, I believe the £7k loss is brought forward from the 2016/2017 tax year into the current 2017/2018 tax year, during which it is not used, and so then gets carried forward again into the 2018/2019 tax year. (Assuming you do actually mean the current tax year - if you instead mean the tax year whose return is due at the end of this month and that you are therefore currently working on, subtract 1 from all those year numbers!) Note that I say that the £7k loss is brought forward from the 2016/2017 tax year rather than just "a previous tax year". That's because if it originally arose in say the 2014/2015 tax year, the same principle says that it will first have been carried forward unchanged into 2015/2016, then carried forward unchanged again into 2016/2017, then carried forward unchanged yet again into 2017/2018, resulting in the above happening. And for a similar reason, I say that the loss is carried forward into the 2018/2019 tax year, not just "a future tax year". As to what you show on the tax return concerned, it depends on whether you have to fill in the capital gains section at all. If you don't (and I don't see any reason why you definitely do in what you've told us, but there might be in details you haven't told us, e.g. if the size of the £5k gain depends on making a CGT claim), then you don't have to say anything at all. Personally, though, I would stick something in an additional information box somewhere saying something like "I do not need to fill in the capital gains section, but I have £7,000 allowable losses brought forward from [year of the last tax return that described them]. None of them are used and they are not added to in 2017/2018, so they are carried forward into 2018/2019." That makes "what were these losses???" questions from the taxman less likely, and also could be a useful reminder to yourself about where the details can be found. If you do have to fill in the capital gains section, I would answer the questions it poses about brought-forward and carried-forward losses on the above basis - i.e. that £7k is brought forward from the preceding tax year, none of it is used during the tax year, and so £7k is carried forward into the following tax year. Having said all that, if someone has filled in a past tax return by not saying anything at all about brought-forward losses that are neither used nor added to, I can hardly see them getting into trouble about it. It makes no difference to the tax due and at worst, they've suffered an understandable misunderstanding about what's expected and in the fairly unlikely event that the taxman picks up on an apparent inconsistency and asks for an explanation, might have to explain the exact situation behind their answers. Gengulphus
gengulphus
11/1/2018
19:58
I have a gain in the current tax year which is less than £5000. I also have a carried forward loss from a previous year of £7000. Will this years gain be offset against the previous loss, and do I even need to show the c/f loss or save it for next year when hopefully my gain will be in excess of the CGT allowance. Regards G2
geordy2
10/1/2018
20:45
cgtcalculator.com seems to be working ok now.
handykart
09/1/2018
13:56
Anyone know why the cgt calculator on: cgtcalculator.com is no longer working?
gbh2
09/1/2018
09:22
thanks Gengulphus.. Converting the data from cgt to stonebanks works fine and the new format comes out but after that i enter the converted data into item 2 (assuming that's what i need to do?) No relevant data seems to come out & Java is enabled.. Does anyone know how to use Stonebanks with converted data from cgt cal? I'm assuming stonebanks is working?
yes yes
09/1/2018
08:27
yes yes, doesn't appear to be working,hopefully this is a temporary blip but is there a way of quickly transfering the data from cgt calculator to stonebanks? Yes, there appears to be a way to transfer the data - see items 5 & 6 on http://www.stonebanks.co.uk/ (and item 4 if you want to move data the other way). Can't guarantee "quickly" or anything else about how well it does the job - I've never used it, I simply remembered having see something along those lines years ago and so took a look. Gengulphus
gengulphus
08/1/2018
20:12
Having same problem. Was working ok last night.
handykart
08/1/2018
17:52
doesn't appear to be working,hopefully this is a temporary blip but is there a way of quickly transfering the data from cgt calculator to stonebanks?
yes yes
08/1/2018
13:08
Is anybody else having problems with the cgtcalculator in the header? I get the following error. thanks. HTTP Error 500.19 - Internal Server Error
orchestralis
08/12/2017
11:36
THanks for your replies
asif12
04/12/2017
19:44
amalanchier3, Good point about the possibility of the issuing country being the UK - I'll edit in a mention of that point. As to which UK coins that applies to, you're probably right but I've no personal knowledge about it, so I'll leave you/others to give answers on that point. Gengulphus
gengulphus
04/12/2017
19:02
Hi Gengulphus My understanding is that Sovereigns and Britannias are legal tender in the UK and are therefore free of UK CGT. A
amalanchier3
04/12/2017
16:45
asif12, I've no experience of buying and selling gold, of dealing with tax on anyone else's dealings in gold, or of using BullionVault, so the following is only my best guesses based on general knowledge of CGT. I know of no reason why CGT should treat gold specially, and a quick look through likely sections of HMRC's Capital Gains manual didn't reveal one. So I think that normal CGT rules would apply. They would indicate that if what you own is one or more specific pieces of gold, each one of them possibly jointly with other people, then after any one of them is sold, you (and its co-owners if any) would need to determine the gain or loss on that specific item - what it was sold for minus that specific item's acquisition cost (i.e. what it was bought for) and all of its other allowable costs. Also, the chattels exemption might apply, or if the physical objects are coins that are currently legal tender in the country that issued them, they would be treated as foreign currency or (edit) as UK currency (which is exempt from CGT) if the issuing country is the UK. If on the other hand what you own is "X grams of gold held with BullionVault", with nothing linking that to ownership of specific physical items, then I suspect that technically, you don't own physical gold at all, but rather derivative securities entitling you to receive the market value of grams of physical gold held by BullionVault (or their custodian). And unless those securities have serial numbers or something similar that allows you to distinguish one of them from another and track their ownership individually, the share identification rules should apply to calculating gains/losses on them when they are sold. But as I said above, this is all guesswork - hopefully, informed guesswork, but guesswork nevertheless... Gengulphus
gengulphus
28/11/2017
11:13
Hi, Does anyone know the tax liabilities of buying and selling gold using BullionVault?
asif12
18/10/2017
11:01
Thank you very much. I shall follow your links and digest it all. I'll also have to look further into the IHT aspect of the second question.
finkwot
24/9/2017
05:56
would be very grateful if someone can tell me what forms need to filled in for our SAR when disposing of overseas shares,in Particular the TSX and ASX (not the usa). Thanks in advance
who r u who r u
20/9/2017
10:21
Dropped by 4% on 15th Sept. but partially recovered since. Quite unusual as normally not volatile. Maybe net asset value affected by drop in U.S. bonds.
jaz36
20/9/2017
09:50
I think the chart's adrift. Quote is 3875 - 3909 and trades in recent days haven't been as low as 3800.
jonwig
20/9/2017
09:25
Any idea what caused the share price drop, surely can't be the modest share issue?
jaz36
15/9/2017
12:38
Gengulphus, thank you, guess I'll give it a go and find out :)
50plus
14/9/2017
03:59
My basic question is, would this 4x rule still apply if I was trading within a Share Dealing ISA? I'm pretty certain the answer is simply no: everything that happens inside an ISA is completely 'invisible' to CGT. The only sort-of-exceptions are when assets (other than sterling cash!) are transferred between an ISA and non-tax-sheltered ownership. But those are half 'inside' and half 'outside' the ISA, and it's only the 'outside' part that's 'visible'. E.g. if one withdraws shares from an ISA, then as far as CGT is concerned, the shares appear out of thin air - and they need a base value for subsequent CGT purposes. That value is their market value on the day of withdrawal, and the ISA manager is supposed to tell the client what it is. Gengulphus
gengulphus
13/9/2017
17:15
Gengulphus, I'd very much appreciate your opinion regarding the following please: This last year or two my Disposals have been in excess of 100k which meant that I was required to inform the Tax office, even though I'd not made a profit that exceeded the annual CGT amount. The reason, as explained by the tax office was that my disposals were more than four times greater than the annual CGT amount for an indiviual. My basic question is, would this 4x rule still apply if I was trading within a Share Dealing ISA?
50plus
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