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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Bluefield Solar Income Fund Limited LSE:BSIF London Ordinary Share GG00BB0RDB98 ORD NPV
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.50 0.38% 131.50 131.50 132.50 132.00 131.00 131.00 382,509 16:29:43
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 0.7 44.9 12.2 10.8 487

Bluefield Solar Income Share Discussion Threads

Showing 251 to 270 of 300 messages
Chat Pages: 12  11  10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
23/3/2020
19:21
strutt12 as far as my understanding goes: Total earning 18/19 = £40.7m x 19.12% to shareholders = £7.8m Revenue through FITs = £4.3m so Dividends the company are already paying out are far more than fit earns. The company comment this regards depreciation: The portfolio NAV will depreciate towards the end of the Company's life. The Investment Adviser has been requested to model how the portfolio NAV will move with time, producing long term scenario planning for the Boards' review. The Board has authorised the Investment Adviser to negotiate lease extensions on all active plants, as each successful extension increases the life of the Fund and reduces the depreciation of the NAV. Lastly the prices paid for Solar panels is reducing massively with the latest farms being self reliant on generation prices alone. Happy to be corrected / educated
zero the hero
23/3/2020
14:28
Masurenguy, Thankyou I have already read this. The fact the panels may last longer, as I'm sure they will, it's the fit payments that will stop after 20yrs we then rely on the wholesale price of electricity which is way below current income. The building of solar farms requires capital and so either debt will increase or funding will be required, this will then become just another solar farm producer and not an income stock.
strutt12
23/3/2020
14:22
strutt12 - checkout the following. "the company was taking a proactive approach, and returning to investing in the construction of solar farms. Wood said Bluefield was one of the first investors to fund assets through construction while listed peers would only buy solar farms that were built and operational. Although the landscape of subsidies was different then, he was confident non-subsidised solar farms were cheap enough to build so that the returns would ‘earnings efficient’." Citywire, 4/10/19 Furthermore, the productive life of solar panels is probably closer to 35/40 years than the 25 originally envisaged. See post #225 hTTps://uk.advfn.com/cmn/fbb/thread.php3?id=30084909&from=202
masurenguy
23/3/2020
11:22
I'm very close to buying in here but have a question regards returns. As I see it you currently get paid a dividend for 20 years due to government subsidy on solar generation. the return is attractive but what happens after the fit payments stop? The assets will be 25yr old panels with little income so your capital will be lost? I'd appreciate your thoughts.
strutt12
20/3/2020
12:02
I've bought back in, I think a vaguely index linked share is worth having in a world of helicopters.
spittingbarrel
13/3/2020
17:38
The FTSE closed 5366 today, which is 29% below its closing position at the end of last year on 31 December. BSIF closed at 130.0 today compared to 139.5 on 31 December, a decline of just 7% over that same period. It is currently my third largest holding, at 7.3% of my overall portfolio, so I'm a very happy holder and may well increase my stake if the price slips a bit further over the next few weeks.
masurenguy
03/3/2020
09:21
It is v sensitive to discount rate - but in current low to no to negative yield environment moving the discount rate in is not unreasonable The question is what's the right discount rate for long term electisity price forecasts (IMO much wider than 6.50 percent) v the right discount for RPId ROCs (much much tighter than 6.50) Would be interesting to value the ROCs at say 3 percent to see what rate that would leave for power price forecasts
williamcooper104
25/2/2020
12:58
Well said, Pinsim, and well spotted.
a0002577
25/2/2020
09:35
That's a big drop in the discount rate, down from 7.18% to 6.5%. And note the sensitivity analysis: When discount rate falls by -0.5%, the impact on fair value of Director's valuation is + £16.1m, impact on NAV per share 4.35p. In other words, if they had kept the discount rate unchanged at 7.18% then the NAV would have been 5.9p lower than the published 120.75p.
pimsim
25/2/2020
07:43
As usual, good clarity from the Chairman on the business model, valuation and risks of power prices over a timescale
18bt
25/2/2020
07:24
Current shareprice premium to NAV (December figure) is circa 10%. Projected yield for 2020 on yesterdays closing price is circa 6%. Interim Financial Statements to 31 December 2019 Six months ended 31 December 2019 25 February 2020 Total operating income: £28,350,661 Total comprehensive income before tax: £27,677,999 Total underlying earnings: £20,708,427 Earnings per share: 7.48p Underlying EPS available for distribution: 3.42p Underlying EPS brought forward: 0.60p Total underlying EPS available for distribution: 4.02p 1(st) interim dividend for the year ending 30 June 2020: 1.95p Dividend Target for 2020: 7.90p (LY 7.68p) NAV per share: 120.75p (LY 117.9p) Chairman John Rennocks said: "The performance of the Company over the first six months of this financial year has once again been highly pleasing. The valuation reflects the lower end of the market conditions that have been with us for some time, and the strong earnings for the period have put the Company in an excellent position to once again deliver a sector leading dividend. Looking ahead, the Board understands the desire many shareholders have to see the Company grow again and so we look forward to updating you in due course with plans to enable the Company to continue to play a material role in the evolution of the UK's energy market."
masurenguy
31/1/2020
13:51
Short/medium term you are right Long term JPM are right Question is how short is short/medium and how long is long And to that I have no clue Wish they'd just securitise their ROCs (unbelievably valuable) to leave a share price that was literally just power price risk
williamcooper104
31/1/2020
13:49
Usually solar farms don't own the land their on So will have to negotiate with the land owner for new lease (most out outside of the act so don't have any protection/security of occupation)
williamcooper104
31/1/2020
13:38
Was reading some previous posts and saw the below. ============= What will happen to my solar panels after 25 years? "The truth is we don`t really know – there`s not really a lot of data to look at since photovoltaics is a relatively new technology (the vast majority of all solar panels are less than 10 years old). However, from what we are seeing so far, we have reason to be excited. Here are a couple of interesting reports: A 33W solar panel (Arco Solar 16-2000) actually outperformed it’s original factory specifications 30 years after it was manufactured. World`s first modern solar panel still works after 60 years. Kyocera has reported several solar power installations that continue to operate reliably and generate electricity even though they are nearly 30 years old. The technology has improved, the solar panels on today`s market are more robust and durable. This is where it gets really interesting. What does all of this actually mean? The lifespan of a modern solar panel is far longer than the 20 years that we use to calculate costs and earnings. This basically translates into more money in your pocket. I would bet that a solar panel installed today would be up and running (and still generating a good amount of electricity) 30 – 40 years down the line." hTTps://energyinformative.org/lifespan-solar-panels/ ========= I am going to stick my neck out here and say...….although individual solar panels have a life...…...solar farms do not. All panels in a farm will not fail.....all together, at 25 years. They will fail individually, and can be replaced individually. I am thinking 2 guys and a fork lift truck...….and a supply of panels. Replace as they fail.
11_percent
31/1/2020
12:07
I may be speaking too soon, but buyers are stepping up at support this morning - BSIF goes xd next week, the yield may be putting a floor under the price here
tartshagger
31/1/2020
08:26
Cool well good luck with your position - correct ref the one percent I didn’t read the end of your post properly. Rationality hasn’t gone out of the window at all - I’m not talking anything other than factual market mechanics...it will hopefully bounce from here.
nimbo1
31/1/2020
08:03
I'm not going to continue this debate since rationality has gone out of the window and you keep moving the goalposts. You can believe whatever you want to believe. "1 percent of shares sold in a company" Meanwhile, who stated that 1% of the shares had been sold? I stated that 1% of the shares had been traded, which covers both sides of the equation.
masurenguy
30/1/2020
21:49
‘Shares rise or fall before the market opens based on reaction to news before any trades have been placed’.... watch the opening auctions on L2! For c.10 minutes every morning buys and sells are matched against each other (demand and supply in action - the weight on either side determines the opening price...sentiment impacts the buy side or sell side volume - the supply and demand on either side moves the price - always). That auction happens c7.50 am before the market actually opens - where electronic trading is in play anyway. 1 percent of shares sold in a company if there is no demand for stock because sentiment has been trashed by those articles can easily move the share price down - as we’ve all just witnessed proving demand and supply of stock is always the driver of share prices.
nimbo1
30/1/2020
15:48
"no need to split hairs. sentiment when it leads to a reaction from a market participant involves a buy or a sell" It is not 'splitting hairs' ! Demand and supply are measurable equations whereas sentiment is an emotional/subjective response. Many share prices rise or fall at the market open based upon reaction to news and that is before any trades have been placed. Tartshaggers posts above illustrate the fact that sells over the past 2 days were triggered by the JPM report and therefore based entirely upon sentiment. The price fall since then is based upon circa 3.7m shares traded over these two days and that just constitutes 1% of the shares in issue, so liquidity and demand/supply issues are really not significant factors in this context.
masurenguy
30/1/2020
14:06
measurenguy - no need to split hairs. sentiment when it leads to a reaction from a market participant involves a buy or a sell... therefore call it what you want sentiment or excess supply....if there are more sellers than buyers in the demand equation prices fall....as it is now doing... fwiw there is ok support at 130p for the moment from both a chart and L2 perspective thanks tartshagger for your post. I would be a buyer here at 120p for sure although I don't think it will get there.
nimbo1
Chat Pages: 12  11  10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
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