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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Bhp Group Plc LSE:BHP London Ordinary Share GB00BH0P3Z91 ORD $0.50
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 2,074.50 2,073.50 2,075.00 - 0.00 00:00:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Mining 43,970.7 17,786.5 161.6 12.3 43,815

Bhp Share Discussion Threads

Showing 1326 to 1350 of 1400 messages
Chat Pages: 56  55  54  53  52  51  50  49  48  47  46  45  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
07/10/2021
05:11
Https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/06/oil-markets-us-crude-futures-energy-supply.html
waldron
07/10/2021
05:07
European markets set to bounce back at the open in rollercoaster week for stocks Published Thu, Oct 7 202112:27 AM EDT Holly Ellyatt @HollyEllyatt Key Points European stocks are expected to bounce back on Thursday, opening higher and continuing a week that has seen wild swings in global market sentiment and trading. The U.K.’s FTSE index is seen opening 80 points higher at 7,070, Germany’s DAX 198 points higher at 15,156, France’s CAC 40 up 88 points at 6,576 and Italy’s FTSE MIB 228 points higher at 25,552, according to data from IG.
waldron
06/10/2021
07:04
Oil prices could hit an ‘off the charts spike,’ says strategist Published Tue, Oct 5 202111:22 PM EDTUpdated 3 Hours Ago Weizhen Tan @weizent cnbc Key Points OPEC+ is sticking to an earlier pact on oil output despite calls for more crude to be pumped. John Driscoll, chief strategist at JTD Energy Services, said that OPEC+ decision was a “very prudent course of action” until one considers the ongoing energy crises and possible supply disruptions. Oil prices jumping to $100 per barrel is possible, but it’s not one that is sustainable, Driscoll said.
waldron
05/10/2021
19:05
Https://investingnews.com/daily/resource-investing/base-metals-investing/iron-investing/top-iron-producing-countries/
waldron
05/10/2021
18:38
Profiling the world’s top five iron ore producing companies in 2020 Features & AnalysisMiningOther Commodities By NS Energy Staff Writer 10 May 2021 Many of the world's largest miners are involved in producing iron ore, with significant amounts of activity based in Western Australia Iron Ore Christmas Creek Australia - FMG Christmas Creek iron ore processing facility in Western Australia (Credit: Fortescue Metals Group) Iron ore producing companies supply a vital component of modern industry, with iron ore used across the world primarily as an ingredient in steel manufacturing. The metallic ores, which can vary in colour from dark grey and bright yellow, to purples and reds, comprise around 5% of the Earth’s crust and are commonly found in four main types of deposit, the most frequently mined being hematite. Worldwide production of these ores totalled an estimated 2.4 billion tonnes in 2020, according to data from the US Geological Survey. This was slightly lower than in 2019, largely due to disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic – but analysts have forecast a rebound over the coming years as mining operations resume and demand, driven by China’s huge steelmaking industry, makes a resurgence. Australia possesses the world’s largest-known iron ore reserves with around 50 billion tonnes available to be unearthed, and many of the most productive iron ore miners have based their operations in this country. Here, NS Energy profiles the top five iron ore producing countries in the world, based on their mining output in 2020. Top five largest iron ore producing companies in the world in 2020 1. Vale – 300 million tonnes Brazilian miner Vale was the world’s top producer of iron ore in 2020, with an output totalling just over 300 million tonnes – a small decline from 2019 when it produced 302 million tonnes of the metallic ore. The Carajás mine in northern Brazil is Vale’s largest operation and is among the biggest iron ore mines in the world. Brazil ranks second among countries with the world’s largest iron ore reserves, and Vale’s production operations are focused in this region of South America. Vale’s iron ore production has fallen from former heights in recent years, but the miner is targeting annual production capacity of 400 million tonnes by the end of 2022. The company is headed by chief executive officer Eduardo Bartolomeo. 2. Rio Tinto – 286 million tonnes Anglo-Australian miner Rio Tinto produced just under 286 million tonnes of iron ore in 2020 – a 1.7% increase on the previous year. The company’s iron ore operations are largely based in the Pilbara region of Australia, which is the world’s top iron ore producing country and home to the largest known reserves. It’s Pilbara operations comprise a network of 16 iron ore mines, four independent port terminals, a 1,700-kilometre rail network and other related infrastructure. Rio Tinto also has a majority interest in Iron Ore Company of Canada (IOC), which contributed 10.4 million tonnes to its overall production in 2020. Jakob Stausholm is currently chief executive officer, having replaced former boss Jean-Sébastien Jacques who resigned in 2020 after Rio’s controversial destruction of an aboriginal heritage site in Pilbara during 2020. 3. BHP – 248 million tonnes Australia-headquartered BHP mined just over 248 million tonnes of iron ore in its financial year ended 30 June 2020, marking a 3.9% annual increase. In the six months to December 31 2020 – the first half of its 2021 financial year – the company produced 128 million tonnes of iron ore, and has set full-year guidance at 245-255 million tonnes. Like Rio Tinto, BHP’s iron ore assets are focused in the resource-rich Pilbara region of Western Australia, including five mines, four processing hubs and two port facilities, known collectively as Western Australia Iron Ore (WAIO). The diversified miner, which is also second among the world’s largest copper mining companies, is headed by CEO Mike Henry, who has been in the role since January 2020. He succeeded former boss Andrew Mackenzie who has since been appointed chairman of oil major Royal Dutch Shell. iron ore producing companies Mining truck at BHP’s Newman iron ore hub in Pilbara, Western Australia (Credit: BHP) 4. Fortescue Metals Group – 204 million tonnes Australia’s Fortescue Metals Group (FMG) ranks fourth among the world’s largest iron ore producing companies, with output of just over 204 million tonnes in its financial year ended 30 June 2020 – a slight decrease compared to the previous 12 months. In the first half of its 2021 financial year, the company produced 108.4 million tonnes of iron ore. Unlike the other companies on this list which have diversified interests across a number of commodities, FMG’s sole focus has historically been on iron ore mining. However, it is also in the process of broadening its horizons with exploration ventures in other parts of Australia as well as in Ecuador, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, Portugal and Kazakhstan for minerals including copper, gold and lithium. The miner operates assets across the Pilbara region, including the Chichester and Solomon mining hubs, and it is in the process of developing the Western Hub, which will be home to the Eliwana mine. Fortescue is headed by chief executive officer Elizabeth Gaines, who has held the position since 2017 and was previously the company’s chief financial officer. 5. Anglo American – 61 million tonnes Anglo American produced just over 61 million tonnes of iron ore in 2020, down from 65.5 million tonnes in the previous year. The London-headquartered mining business has two major operations focused on iron ore production – a majority ownership of the Kumba project in South Africa as well as the Minas-Rio operation in Brazil. The Kumba project comprises two open pit mines – Sishen and Kolomela – with production shipped to China, Japan, Europe, India and the Americas. Mark Cutifani has been Anglo American CEO since 2013.
waldron
05/10/2021
15:18
Https://www.globaldata.com/bhp-merger-adds-complications-woodsides-energy-transition-narrative/
waldron
05/10/2021
07:41
Nice find waldron You know, you're making me rather idle in a way. Instead of trawling the net for BHP news i merely wait for you to kindly post it on here....lol It's very much appreciated
kipper999
05/10/2021
05:06
Https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/05/china-power-supply-crunch-relationship-with-australia-gdp-outlook.html
waldron
02/10/2021
19:30
Europe Turns To Russia For More Coal As Energy Prices Skyrocket By Haley Zaremba - Oct 02, 2021, 2:00 PM CDT Europe is facing a perfect storm of increasing demand for energy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, and a dwindling supply of natural gas used to produce electricity. As Europe’s struggling energy markets look to import any form of affordable energy they can, power producers have resorted to asking for Russian coal as well. Europe is competing with Asia for limited energy resources as both continents surge back to life as pandemic restrictions ease. Join Our Community Energy prices are through the roof across Europe as demand surges and supplies tighten in the wake of the novel coronavirus pandemic. Over the course of the global economic shutdown, energy production has decreased considerably as industries shut down, people stayed inside, and demand for electricity and fuel plummeted. Now, as the world returns to work and gets back to the ‘new normal’, energy demand is back with a vengeance, but the energy supply simply isn’t there. Europe’s leading natural gas benchmark, the Dutch Title Transfer Facility, reports that prices have skyrocketed from €16 per megawatt-hour at the beginning of this year to €75 by mid-September, representing an increase of more than 360%. Italian officials have warned their citizens to expect a 40% increase in their bills in the coming weeks and months. Spain has agreed to send €100 payments to over 5.8 million low-income households and sent a letter to Brussels pleading with the European Union (EU) to take sweeping action. And then there’s Russia. Nearly half of all-natural gas imports in the EU come from the great white north, making Europe highly dependent on the Kremlin for its energy security. This dependence is a big part of the reason that Europe is now entering into an energy crisis, because as demand for natural gas has surged, Russia has not increased its exports to the EU. For one thing, Europe is competing with Asia for limited energy resources as both continents surge back to life as pandemic restrictions ease. So far, markets seem to be favoring Asia, for economic as well as strategic reasons. There is rife speculation that this is a strategic decision on the part of the Putin administration in order to push through the opening of the controversial Nord Stream 2 pipeline. The 1,230-kilometre pipeline, which runs under the Baltic Sea to connect Russia and Germany, is complete but has yet to come online. The project has drawn much criticism for “perpetuating the bloc's dependence on fossil fuels and extending President Putin's geopolitical influence” according to Euronews. And now Europe’s dependence on Russia is being put into stark relief by the current energy crunch and appeasing the Kremlin while also opening a new entry point for much-needed natural gas may make the Nord Stream 2 seem a little more appealing. Russia is not just playing hard-to-get with natural gas. As Europe’s struggling energy markets look to import any form of affordable energy they can, power producers have resorted to asking for Russian coal as well, with little success. The EU has been working on weaning itself off of coal entirely for years now, and when demand for the dirtiest fossil fuel suddenly spikes this winter, the previously shunned fuel source will likely be in extremely short supply, as supply routes out of Russia, the world’s third-largest coal exporter, have been almost entirely redirected to Asia. “If all the European utilities switch to coal, it will result in a huge spike in coal demand that Russia alone cannot provide for on such a short notice,” Natasha Tyrina, research analyst at Wood Mackenzie Ltd. told Bloomberg this week. “That would need supply from other countries as well, from the U.S. for example, but the situation there is similar to everywhere else.” As we head into the cold winter months, Europe’s energy crisis is set to worsen, and their dependence on Russia to keep the lights on will only intensify. Asia, too, will be facing an energy crunch this winter, leading the entire world to resort to burning more and more coal at a time that most countries have pledged to do exactly the opposite. At a moment that countries are just beginning a green energy transition in earnest, and the United Nations is sounding a “code red for humanity” concerning climate change, this return to coal is an extremely worrying development that will hopefully be short-lived as even coal proves to be insufficient to ease supply crunches in the coming months. By Haley Zaremba for Oilprice.com
waldron
02/10/2021
07:14
German Coal Plant Runs Completely Out Of Coal By Tsvetana Paraskova - Oct 01, 2021, 10:30 AM CDT German utility Steag halted its coal-fired power plant Bergkamen-A after it ran out of hard coal supplies amid an energy crunch globally and logistics challenges domestically, the company told Bloomberg on Friday. “We are short of hard coal,” Steag spokesman Daniel Muhlenfeld told Bloomberg via email. “There is a strong demand for coal per se and secondly, there is a strong demand for transport by barge. And since Bergkamen has no rail connection, there are no logistical alternatives available here,” Muhlenfeld said. Lignite and hard coal accounted for around 26 percent of Germany’s power generation in the first half of 2021, according to data from the German Association of Energy and Water Industries, BDEW. In recent weeks, utilities across Europe have fired up more coal-powered generation as natural gas prices continue to surge. Even the UK, which has pledged to phase out coal-fired power generation by October 2024, had to fire up earlier this month an old coal plant that was on standby in order to meet its electricity demand. The share of coal in Britain’s electricity mix during some periods in September—albeit below 3 percent—was more than double compared to the below-1-percent share in September 2020. Gas and power prices in Europe are at all-time highs, as Europe is low not only on natural gas supply as the heating season begins on October 1. Coal is also in short supply as some utilities are forced to switch to coal from gas due to the surging gas prices. Coal prices are also surging amid a tight global market supply with Chinese demand booming and with high EU carbon prices. Officials at Russian companies tell Bloomberg that European utilities are asking for coal. But Europe may not get much incremental coal supply anytime soon, as Russian coal exports are constrained just as gas deliveries are. By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com
adrian j boris
29/9/2021
20:11
Waldron et al, I think miners are the new oil n gas companies. Where the OP dropped the price of Big Oil in the Spring of 2020, I am of the opinion iron ore has dropped/is dropping the big miners. Have determined that I will follow BHP down & buy on the drops. Also considering others in the Mining sector. Contrary opinions encouraged......
milliethedog
29/9/2021
19:47
cheers kip Https://www.tipranks.com/news/article/rio-tinto-vale-bhp-3-iron-ore-giants
waldron
29/9/2021
19:40
www.tipranks.com/news/article/rio-tinto-vale-bhp-3-iron-ore-giants
kipper999
29/9/2021
15:58
Delivering Alpha 2021 Climate change will be an alpha generator for the next four decades, says CalSTRS CIO Published Wed, Sep 29 202111:25 AM EDT Pippa Stevens @PippaStevens13 cnbc Key Points Climate change is a mega trend creating opportunities for investors. “If you take advantage of it, and get ahead of it, it’s going to be an alpha generator for the next 30 or 40 years,” CalSTRS CIO Christopher Ailman said at CNBC’s Delivering Alpha conference. Wendy Cromwell, vice chair at Wellington, said data is key for investors looking to invest around ESG. ESG investing, or when a company’s environmental, social and governance factors are evaluated, is booming, and a panel of sustainability-focused investors said the trend is only going to accelerate from here. Climate change “is a mega-trend that if you take advantage of it, and get ahead of it, it’s going to be an alpha generator for the next 30 or 40 years,” CalSTRS Chief Investment Officer Christopher Ailman said Wednesday at CNBC’s “Delivering Alpha.” “If you don’t pay attention to it, it’s going to be a negative alpha and you’re going to be stuck with a low-beta return.” Wendy Cromwell, vice chair at Wellington which had $1.4 trillion in assets under management as of the end of the second quarter, echoed these comments, saying of climate change that “investors need to study it, and companies need to be prepared for it.” ESG investing is booming, with global assets in sustainable funds hitting $2.24 trillion at the end of June, according to data from Morningstar. Assets first topped the $1 trillion mark in the second quarter of 2020. But the ESG boom has given rise to its fair share of critics. By nature ESG is subjective, and without standardization across companies and industries it’s hard to evaluate if an ESG-branded product is actually delivering on its stated goals. “There’s no question there are some asset managers who are just using those words because it’s a marketing tool,” said Ailman, although he doesn’t believe ESG has reached bubble status. Regulators in Washington are currently looking into ESG investing with a number of proposals on the table. Cromwell said first and foremost it’s all about data. In terms of the “E” element, she said disclosures around scope one, two and three emissions should be required for all U.S.-listed companies. She added that it’s important for scientists and investors, who often speak different languages, to work together to assess the long-term physical risks for companies from climate change, such as from wild fire and flooding exposure. Carine Ihenacho, chief governance and compliance officer at Norges Bank Investment Management, said it’s vital to cut through the noise around company promises and the ESG investing boom more generally. “Find out what types of issues are material to companies...how does the company manage it, and how does the company then report the progress,” she said. Norges is the world’s largest sovereign wealth fund with more than $1.4 trillion in assets under management. The fund previously announced plans to phase out fossil fuel exposure, specifically around companies engaged in exploration and production. More funds are following suit — often succumbing to pressure — including Harvard University, which earlier this month said it will stop investing in the fossil fuel industry. But Ailman cautioned against viewing divestment as a be all and end all strategy. He considers divestment to be ESG 1.0, while engagement — a far more useful and important strategy — to be ESG 2.0. “Divesting doesn’t reduce the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. Engagement does. I can’t emphasize that enough,” he said. “Engagement and turning peoples’ attitudes, turning companies around, is what’s absolutely critical now because climate changes isn’t just the energy industry, it’s a lot of other industries, and the whole world has to change.” This attitude played out when CalSTRS joined upstart activist fund Engine No. 1 in the fight for representation on Exxon’s board. The fund garnered support from high-profile investors like CalSTRS, and ultimately placed three of its four nominees on Exxon’s board of directors following a close and contentious vote at the oil giant’s annual meeting. “We took on that board. We changed that board and we are really changing that company from the top down,” he said, noting that Exxon has the scientists, resources and capital to move the needle on issues like carbon capture. “That was huge,” he said of shaking up the board. “It was climbing Mount Everest when you just take up mountaineering for the first time.”
waldron
29/9/2021
15:26
U.S. Crude-Oil and Fuel Inventories Unexpectedly Rise 29 September 2021 - 05:20PM Dow Jones News By Dan Molinski U.S. oil inventories surprisingly increased last week, while stockpiles of gasoline and other fuels also rose, according to data released Wednesday by the Energy Information Administration. Benchmark U.S. oil prices that were slightly lower before the mostly bearish report drifted slightly higher afterward. The Nymex front-month crude contract for November delivery was recently up 0.4% at $75.63 a barrel. Crude-oil stockpiles rose by 4.6 million barrels to 418.5 million barrels, and are now about 7% below the five-year average, the EIA said. Analysts surveyed by The Wall Street Journal had predicted crude stockpiles would fall by 2.5 million barrels from the prior week. Oil stored at Cushing, the delivery point for U.S. stocks, rose by 131,000 barrels from the previous week, to 34 million barrels, the EIA said in its weekly report. U.S. crude-oil production rose by 500,000 barrels a day last week to 11.1 million barrels a day, according to EIA, as offshore output continued to recover from Hurricane Ida-caused shutdowns. Gasoline stockpiles climbed by 193,000 barrels to 221.8 million barrels, compared with analysts' expectations for inventories to increase by 900,000 barrels from the previous week. Distillate stocks, which include heating oil and diesel fuel, rose by 384,000 barrels to 129.7 million barrels, and are now about 12% below the five-year average, the EIA said. Analysts were forecasting a 1.3-million-barrel decline from the previous week. The refining capacity utilization rate rose by 0.6 percentage points from the previous week to 88.1%, which was close to analysts' forecasts for a 0.8 percentage-point increase from the previous week. U.S. oil inventories for the week ended Sept. 24: Crude Gasoline Distillates Refinery Use EIA data: +4.6 +0.2 +0.4 +0.6 Forecast: -2.5 +0.9 -1.3 +0.8 Note: Numbers in millions of barrels, with the exception of refinery use, which is in percentage points. Write to Dan Molinski at dan.molinski@wsj.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires September 29, 2021 11:05 ET (15:05 GMT)
waldron
29/9/2021
14:42
no doubt recent upside after dam disaster https://uk.advfn.com/cmn/fbb/thread.php3?id=42128472 Https://www.marketscreener.com/quote/stock/VALE-S-A-9970050/
waldron
29/9/2021
14:41
Ok, thanks Was thinking of them at $10...($14 now)
kipper999
29/9/2021
14:40
no kipper keep mainly to european shares these days
waldron
29/9/2021
14:25
waldron "Where i differ is that the various portfolios only hold US,French,German and Swiss shares" Would that include Vale by any chance? (If you don't mind me asking)
kipper999
29/9/2021
10:40
Https://www.nationalobserver.com/2021/09/29/news/canada-second-largest-pension-fund-dumping-oil-assets
waldron
29/9/2021
10:04
chuckle kipper my situation much like yours although my bureau is perhaps larger being open planned so i can watch tv a la distance Despite sitting on paper losses on some shares atleast i am pleased to receive substantial divis which i reinvest in said poor performers Where i differ is that the various portfolios only hold US,French,German and Swiss shares As for COP, I would not blame just China. My concern now,is how the rhetoric between now and then will affect shares chuckle and cheers take care
waldron
29/9/2021
09:10
Really interesting article Waldren, thanks for that. I sit in my small office at home every day trying to figure out which stocks to buy & which have topped out to sell. I get the distinct feeling i have been here before; in Spring of 2020 as Covid bit & the price of Brent hit the floor. I picked up BP & RDSB at, what seem now, ridiculas values. Now, i see the iron ore price do the same to the mining sector. Iron ore being our Brent. The only mining stock in my p/f is BHP (at 14%), tho i have watched RIO, Ferrexpo & Vale. Took the recent bumper divi but am nursing paper losses at the moment. But have decided to do as i did with BP & RDSB and increase my holding up to 25% of p/f.(tho with BP/RDSB it got to 43% before taking profits & reducing recently) Now, the questions i am asking myself are..... how low will iron ore go? where is the share price bottom?? PS; agree with article about Winter Olympics comment. Also, are the Chinese really making efforts to reduce emmitions or is that said to look good as COP26 starts 31 October. Will they return to their polluting ways after these two events are over? Spring '22 All in my view......
kipper999
29/9/2021
08:31
LAMMERGEIER 29 Sep '21 - 08:59 - 5577 of 5577 0 1 0 Https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/other/mining-meltdown-iron-ore-price-slump-sends-shockwaves-through-industry-as-fall-in-demand-from-china-catches-market-by-surprise/ar-AAOVIiJ?ocid=msedgnt
waldron
29/9/2021
07:19
RBC's research is revising its recommendation downwards to Neutral. The target price is lowered from GBX 2300 to GBX 1900.
waldron
28/9/2021
06:52
CITY.A.M Tuesday 28 September 2021 7:35 am BHP braces for backlash by investors over climate plan Farah Ghouri Shareholders in mining giant BHP have been advised to vote against the company’s carbon emission plans, ahead of its annual general meeting in London next month, according to reports. in a report shared with investors Glass Lewis, the influential proxy adviser, questioned the scientific basis of BHP’s Climate Transition Action Plan and said there was “room for improvement,” according to the Financial Times which first reported the news. The world’s biggest mining company has promised to reduce its direct carbon emissions by 30 per cent by 2030, and to become net zero by 2050 – but Glass Lewis said “it is unclear if the company’s current targets are science-based.”;
waldron
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