Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Berkeley Group Holdings LSE:BKG London Ordinary Share GB00B02L3W35 ORD SHS 5P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +6.00p +0.17% 3,472.00p 3,468.00p 3,471.00p 3,473.00p 3,415.00p 3,458.00p 487,415 16:35:01
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Household Goods & Home Construction 2,723.5 812.4 467.8 7.4 4,782.29

Berkeley Group Holdings Share Discussion Threads

Showing 3051 to 3073 of 3075 messages
Chat Pages: 123  122  121  120  119  118  117  116  115  114  113  112  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
28/7/2017
11:10
Good point, his last purchase was on Tuesday and he's now at -0.97% Promotion to the big-board who cost him dear.
jrphoenixw2
28/7/2017
10:00
Odey still winding down their short position, now back under 1%.
bluemango
28/7/2017
09:48
BKG in 2nd place in the FTSE-250, higher market-capn wise than the bottom four of the '100'. Next reshuffle due end August. Promotion would be a nice way to round off the summer.
jrphoenixw2
27/7/2017
11:30
It touched 3508, highest since late Jan 2016 :)
jrphoenixw2
27/7/2017
09:20
Is this a 35 I see before me?
1gw
26/7/2017
09:38
Good point, that's 85p higher than previous from 2 weeks ago. Raising the bar and giving the shorts something new to think about. Small as you say but daily vol was only 415k. Just for the record: Cost = £1.358M 'Date: 25 July 2017 Number: 40,378 Highest px: 3375p Lowest px: 3353p Volume weighted avg px: 3363.2734p Broker: UBS Following the purchase of these Shares, the Company holds 3,395,315 of its Shares in Treasury and has 136,761,868 Shares in issue (excluding Treasury Shares). Previous Cost = £1.524M 'Date: 13 July 2017 Number: 46,465 [daily vol. was 487k] Highest px: 3290p Lowest px: 3260p Volume weighted avg px: 3279.1525p Broker: UBS Following the purchase of these Shares, the Company holds 3,354,937 of its Shares in Treasury and has 136,802,246 Shares in issue (excluding Treasury Shares).' Next previous: Cost = £4.1M 'Date: 12 July 2017 Number: 125,000 [daily vol was 640k] Highest px: 3274p Lowest px: 3247p Volume weighted avg px: 3262.587p Broker: UBS Following the purchase of these Shares, the Company holds 3,308,472 of its Shares in Treasury and has 136,848,711 Shares in issue (excluding Treasury Shares).
jrphoenixw2
26/7/2017
09:18
Another significant step up in the price at which they're prepared to buy back. Only 40k shares, but went up to 3375p yesterday.
1gw
19/7/2017
18:53
Short tracker has the shorts at almost 18 month low
fenners66
19/7/2017
17:47
I noticed it started quiet but some really chunky volume begun coming in around lunchtime UK/the US open. Still, at daily vol of 378k vs avg vol of 637k that's only 59% so summer-zzzz. Meanwhile I wonder how Odey is doing. hTTp://shorttracker.co.uk/company/GB00B02L3W35/all Just over a month to the next X/D...
jrphoenixw2
19/7/2017
16:22
Encouraging to see that we've left the buybacks behind, so the current phase of the rally is not just down to that.
1gw
19/7/2017
16:17
Nothing to say really. I don't have Bloomberg (info service) so don't know reason for uptick. Before Brexit thought they could have hit £45 by now.
r ball
19/7/2017
16:01
Touched a new 52-week high of 3425p this afternoon.
jrphoenixw2
19/7/2017
15:32
Crossing £34 again surely worth a post?
1gw
19/7/2017
15:27
No reason to sell?
r ball
14/7/2017
08:29
Buy back curtailed by afternoon price action?
r ball
14/7/2017
07:12
'Date of transaction: 13 July 2017 Number of Shares purchased: 46,465 Highest price paid per Share: 3290p Lowest price paid per Share: 3260p Volume weighted average price paid per Share: 3279.1525p Broker: UBS The Company intends to hold the purchased Shares in Treasury. Following the purchase of these Shares, the Company holds 3,354,937 of its Shares in Treasury and has 136,802,246 Shares in issue (excluding Treasury Shares).' = £1.524million
jrphoenixw2
13/7/2017
13:16
No probs. I'm not too bothered either, for the time being, pre-retirement. I don't *enjoy* the opacity of how the buy-backs function but realise they have to have opacity for max impact. @ RBall. Presumably they're being paid a material proportion in stock, options and likely long-term tied in incentive comp. Tony P has £180million of shares, I'd say his interests are veeery closely aligned with other longs. Don't know all the variables at play in their comp, EPS or some blend. FWIW the place I worked the main driver for any bonus was ROE for the division through a prism of personal performance versus a selected unpublished peer group each of whom rated you each year. Certainly kept you on your toes trying to guess which random colleagues you were competing with vs the bonus pool :) That was all in the name of 'Aligning employee remuneration with shareholder value' and c15/+ years ago now. I expect that such a then cutting edge approach has since trickled down far and wide into the corporate sector. ps Just pondering how tricky it is to spot buy-backs as they happen. There was a chunk of volume at c11.30am that lifted the price from 3260. We'll see!
jrphoenixw2
13/7/2017
11:39
Me too. But directors pay needs to be linked to Eps adjusted for sharebuybacks.
r ball
13/7/2017
10:44
Cheers Jrphoenixw2. Personally not too bothered as to split between div or cap gain, can always sell shares if more income needed (tax issues acknowledged), so provided company ethos is efficiency driven, I am happy.
dr_smith
13/7/2017
10:22
@DR Smith 'IMV, buybacks do not affect a companies profitability, but can mean less spare cash, so less likely to pay larger divs than the norm, so it could be said cap gain likely to increase for investor at expense of Divs.' The sum for the cash-return/div is fixed annually through 2021, it's simply the proportions returned in cash or via buy-backs that are in play. The 'Capital return programme' which IIRC was extended/raised in Dec-2015 was based on existing forward sales meaning they expect excess capital/cash vs plans to spend it. DR-Smith: 'Sentiment/sp is a reflection of co profitability/prsopects, so by maximising profitability/efficiency of use of spare cash, they are maximising value for shareholders. IMO :-)' Agreed with that, and if you look back through how they framed the plan that's what they're aiming for. I agree not knowing what future cash divs are isn't ideal, perhaps especially if you're budgeting on presently needing to live off that income. I console myself that that day is still a couple of years off. And that the Board are also major share-holders, so they're getting their share of pain/uncertainty/etc too, but they're doing it for our collective good, and for the long-term.
jrphoenixw2
13/7/2017
10:09
Maybe worth recapping how BKG originally framed it in their Interim Results a/o Dec 2016. 'SHAREHOLDER RETURNS PROGRAMME The Board of Berkeley has reviewed the mechanism for making the remaining £10.00 per share payments under the Shareholder Returns Programme that was put in place in 2011, and enhanced this time last year from £13.00 per share to £16.34 per share. The current heightened macro uncertainty has led to significant market volatility and there is a dislocation between this and both underlying market conditions and the strength of Berkeley’s operating model. As a consequence, the Board is proposing to introduce flexibility such that the remaining £10.00 per share payments can be made through a combination of share buy-backs and dividends, as opposed to solely dividends. This recognises that, at certain price points, the Board is of the opinion that the Company is materially undervalued and share buy-backs will be in the best interests of all shareholders. In making this change, the Board is also proposing that the payments should be re-characterised from being a value per share, to be an absolute value per annum. This ensures that the same quantum of cash will be returned as previously anticipated, but on a smaller number of shares, to the extent share buy-backs occur. This absolute value will be increased appropriately for any new shares issued. [page 1] THE BERKELEY GROUP HOLDINGS PLC INTERIM RESULTS FOR THE SIX MONTHS ENDED 31 OCTOBER 2016 [page2] £ per share £’million Paid to date £6.34 £854.9 By 30 September 2017 £2.00 £277.7 By 30 September 2018 £2.00 £277.7 By 30 September 2019 £2.00 £277.7 By 30 September 2020 £2.00 £277.7 By 30 September 2021 £2.00 £277.7 To come * £10.00 £1,388.5 Total £16.34 £2,243.4 * based on a net 138.8 million shares in issue as at 31 October 2016 The Board believes that this change will ensure that Berkeley’s shareholders fully benefit from the value embedded in the business. The Company will consult with Shareholders on consequential changes to the 2011 LTIP to ensure this reflects these changes, prior to a General Meeting of the Company in the New Year. [page 3 from the ‘Chairman̵7;s statement’] At the same time the Board is proposing to introduce flexibility to the Shareholder Returns programme so that future returns can be made by either dividends or share buy backs, as opposed to solely dividends, to the extent the Board believes the prevailing share price materially undervalues the Company and that such purchases would be in the best interests of all shareholders. It remains the intention of the Board to return £2 per share per annum over the next five years under this new mechanism and, for the avoidance of doubt therefore, this is not a reduction in the overall returns allocated to shareholders. [Chief Exec Statement – page 5] The Board of Berkeley has now reviewed the mechanism for making the remaining £10.00 per share payments in light of its assessment that the current short-term macro volatility is preventing the long-term value of Berkeley being recognised by the market. As a consequence, the Board is proposing to introduce flexibility such that the remaining £10.00 per share payments can be made through a combination of share buy-backs and dividends, as opposed to solely dividends. This recognises that, at certain price points, the Board is of the opinion that the Company is materially undervalued and share buy-backs will be in the best interests of all shareholders. In making this change, the Board is also proposing that the payments should be re-characterised from being a value per share, to be an absolute value per annum. This ensures that the same amount of cash will be returned as previously anticipated, but on a smaller number of shares, to the extent share buy-backs occur. This absolute value will be increased appropriately for any new shares issued. [same time-table as laid out above in Chairman’s Statement] The Board believes that this change will ensure that Berkeley’s shareholders fully benefit from the value embedded in the business. In February and August each year, the Company will announce the dividend to be paid at the end of March and September, respectively. This will be calculated as the absolute value amount to be delivered in the six months (£138.8 million based on the current shares in issue), less the cost of any share buy-backs undertaken in the relevant period. Going forward each subsequent relevant period begins on the date of announcement of the dividend for the previous relevant period.' hxxps://www.berkeleygroup.co.uk/media/pdf/d/q/Berkeley_Interim_Announcement_Dec_2016_-_FINAL.pdf
jrphoenixw2
13/7/2017
09:38
IMV, buybacks do not affect a companies profitability, but can mean less spare cash, so less likely to pay larger divs than the norm, so it could be said cap gain likely to increase for investor at expense of Divs. Taking company view, if they have spare cash do they: 1. Put it in bank for FA interest 2. invest in other co's 3. invest in themselves 4. return cash to shareholders If they need the cash for future projects and/or buy land as opportunity presents itself, option 4 would be counter productive. Sentiment/sp is a reflection of co profitability/prsopects, so by maximising profitability/efficiency of use of spare cash, they are maximising value for shareholders. IMO :-)
dr_smith
13/7/2017
08:48
The more of these buy backs they do the greater the reduction to the next dividend. This worries me. The share price is a function of supply and demand, so once the buybacks cease does the demand falls as well? Then the share price? Keeping the price up artificially but for how long? On the plus side with less shares in issue the div p.s. will be higher in the future , but at this rate I may never see those higher dividends as the buybacks continue. So if I'm not going to get the cash return I was expecting here ( I bought at about £25.50) do I have to sell , wait for the end to buybacks and then re-buy?
fenners66
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