Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Barclays Plc LSE:BARC London Ordinary Share GB0031348658 ORD 25P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  6.32 7.88% 86.56 86.09 86.22 87.50 82.87 83.00 94,037,382 16:35:11
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Banks 21,632.0 4,357.0 14.3 6.1 15,003

Barclays Share Discussion Threads

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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
02/6/2019
18:33
If only Leadsom can broker a deal with Boris...anybody remember Boris and Leadsome on that stage debate with the Remainers prior to the Referendum 2016?...
diku
02/6/2019
14:23
It's the future that matters, maxk. I recommend checking it out, won't take long.
poikka
02/6/2019
14:09
No good Poikka, she voted for May's surrender deal three times.
maxk
02/6/2019
13:35
https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m0005qb9/the-andrew-marr-show-02062019
poikka
02/6/2019
13:35
Buywell 768 Watched Andrew Marr interviewing Leadsom, and came away very impressed by a clear-headed woman, able to answer Marr's questions without fudging and with a feasible plan to manage our exit with as little disruption as possible. Whether you like them or not, these people will be in charge of our exit and should be listened to.
poikka
02/6/2019
12:55
Still a bit of a gamble on fallout from any crisis (further!) at DB. DB MCap at $14bn BARC at $32bn LLOY at $51bn Tells a story, I'd say.
poikka
02/6/2019
12:15
Article from motley fool uk 2019 The last time I covered the Barclays (LSE: BARC) share price, I concluded that, despite all of the problems facing the business, the stock could ultimately be worth 80% more than its value at the time “when Barclays finally gets its act together.“ More than a month on, and I still believe shares in the bank could double from current levels, even though activist investor Edward Bramson recently failed in his attempt to get Barclays’ management to shake up the business and prioritise shareholder returns. Legal troubles There’s no denying the bank has struggled to recover from the financial crisis. Even though a decade has passed since the entire UK banking sector was brought to the brink, Barclays just hasn’t been able to shake off its past issues. Indeed, only a few weeks ago, it was fined €210m by the EU for its part in a foreign exchange cartel. It seems to me as if investors just can’t get past the constant string of lawsuits and fines Barclays appears to be facing. And I can’t blame them. However, these issues are also camouflaging the fact there’s a fundamentally strong business under all of the problems, which is producing fantastic profits. Last year, for example, the bank reported a net income from operations of £2.2bn. This year, analysts have pencilled in a net profit of £3.8bn. So far, there seems to be little reason to doubt the City’s growth projections for the firm. CEO Jes Staley is targeting a return on tangible equity (a measure of profitability) of more than 9% for 2019, and 10% for 2020. Insiders have described this goal as “sacrosanct221; and Staley isn’t taking any prisoners in his quest to meet the target. Back in April, it was revealed he is planning to cut bonuses as part of a cost-cutting drive to boost returns at the underperforming investment division, a drastic decision that has risked staff ire. Nonetheless, it’s clear the bank needs to take these actions if its ever going to pull itself out of the doldrums. Undervalued Only time will tell if I’m correct in my assertation that the Barclays share price could double from current, but I reckon the odds are in my favour. Even if earnings stay where they are for the next 10 years, there’s still a good chance the stock could double as, right now, it’s dealing at a historical P/E of just 6.8 and price to book ratio of 0.4. By comparison, shares in international peer HSBC command a P/E of 11.4 and deal at a book value of one. And as well as earnings growth, the City is expecting Barclays’ dividend to rise a double-digit percentage this year as well. After cutting the distribution to save money in 2016, management decided to double the payout in 2018, and analysts believe an increase of 15% is on the cards for 2019. If this comes to fruition, the stock will end the year with a dividend yield of 5%. So, overall, not only is the Barclays share price deeply undervalued compared to its peers, but it also supports a market-beating dividend yield, so there’s something for everyone.
bernie37
01/6/2019
04:36
Trump is there to broker a trade deal. Barclays CEO Staley to meet Trump during UK visit — report Handful of British chief executives will hold talks with US president and Theresa May https://www.fnlondon.com/articles/barclays-ceo-staley-to-meet-trump-during-uk-visit-report-20190531
johnwise
01/6/2019
04:33
1 June 2019 As China’s Communist Party destroys Hong Kong, New York is set to benefit New York is the financial capital of the world. What might surprise people is that it has kept this title longer than market forces might have otherwise dictated thanks to an assist from the Chinese Communist Party https://www.hongkongfp.com/2019/06/01/chinas-communist-party-destroys-hong-kong-new-york-set-benefit/
johnwise
31/5/2019
18:55
Notice how the FTSE in a 20 point range nearly all day...7140 is very crucial or the gates will open up to 6800...also Barc looking for a sharp down move...no momentum in this market/shares...
diku
31/5/2019
15:13
If Staley is so sure why has he along with the bod not bought shares , he is a dud and will be gone in 12 months
portside1
31/5/2019
14:29
long term down The long term trend has been DOWN since Jun 18th, 2018 at 10.500000 intermediate term down The intermediate term trend has been DOWN since Apr 25th, 2019 at 8.200000 short term down The short term trend has been DOWN since May 17th, 2019 at 8.050000
bernie37
31/5/2019
13:52
Yes and selling their goods for a easy life ,Most are parasites
portside1
31/5/2019
13:27
Are those the ones driving Audis and BMWs estates?...
diku
31/5/2019
13:22
And we are not protesting they are just slappers And why do they have cars use diesel taxes They walk away when you ask them questions They are what they are slappers breeding like rats for benefits
portside1
31/5/2019
13:20
Diku 5pm Al yes but we did not get any benefits dad was rich But all my brothers and sisters have either one or two 4 have none ,
portside1
31/5/2019
13:05
porty..no pub today?..
diku
31/5/2019
13:02
I thought that you had a large family?
alphorn
31/5/2019
12:03
Stop paying for women to have babies lStop family allowance ,And tax them if they have more than two Stop giving these girls free homes because they have babies That will sort out global warming They breed like rats to get these benefits
portside1
31/5/2019
12:00
So these young girls under the climate change ,are going to shut down Heathrow , well if these slippers of girls stopped breeding like rats for benefits the problem would be under control . DO THESE SCUM WOMEN NOT UNDERSTAND THAT IT IS population that is killing the planet
portside1
31/5/2019
11:32
KAV From Tw*tt*r #KAV RNS dated 16th May · Although the portable XRF analyser is unable to determine indicative values for gold, silver, and PGEs, results suggest elevated values for cobalt, zinc, nickel and copper. The core also appears to contain high levels of rare earth elements (REEs). + KAV From Tw*tt*r paul johnson ‏@pauljohnson9691 The high REE levels from the core XRF have gone unnoticed. In itself could be a game changer for the project economics #KAV
cpap man
31/5/2019
11:27
Bloomberg Opinion) -- Barclays Plc Chief Executive Officer Jes Staley has staked his own personal success on rebuilding the British bank’s securities unit. That pursuit of Wall Street stardom may be leading the firm into treacherous territory. The remnants of a team disbanded years ago is making millions of dollars for the bank by gaming tax loopholes, Bloomberg News reported on Friday. The group arranges deals that generate profit by lowering taxes on dividends, a practice known as dividend arbitrage. The traders may be generating about 10% of the firm’s stock-trading revenue. While there is no evidence that the deals contravened any laws, the business is controversial and raises the issue of motivation. Is Barclays simply chasing business others won't touch to show shareholders that it is gaining market share? The lender is a bit player in equities, a business Staley wants to grow. Just weeks ago, Barclays fended off Edward Bramson, an activist investor who sought to install himself on the board in a bid to trim the investment bank. He argued that the bank’s trading business, which he called a “black box with too much leverage,” should be reined it. It now appears that his assessment - albeit a bit rough around the edges – that the bank is going after the wrong kind of business might not have been so off the mark. Bramson’s criticized the firm’s excessive focus on hedge fund and private equity firms – customers that can be easily enticed with by providing them with loans. These clients don’t yield as much revenue relative to total assets as those in corporate banking or wealth management, according to the activist. Chasing one-off equity trades with questionable economic objectives such as dividend arbitrage seems to add weight to his concerns: the quality of deals Barclays is pursuing leaves something to be desired. It’s not exactly the low-risk, recurring income it can count on. Regulators have scrutinized the practices and governments are closing loopholes. There are other signs that controls at Barclays may not not as stringent as they should be. Last year, the firm’s risk-management systems were downgraded to code amber from green after failing to predict a series of trading losses. It’s not uncommon – Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc had a similar issue in 2018 – but regulators can demand larger capital buffers as a result, hurting profitability. While Barclays has been pulling away from its local rivals in gaining market share in recent quarters, Staley has recognized returns at the securities unit are still not satisfactory. So in a recent rejig of the investment bank, he put himself directly in charge of the unit’s divisions, and closer to its decision-making. After reporting a surge in trading revenue – including the equities business – that outperformed U.S. peers in August, Staley said that the firm was once again “running free.” Investors may question whether that’s exactly what they want. It will be on Barclays’s board now to show that the investment bank is under adequate scrutiny. To contact the author of this story: Elisa Martinuzzi at To contact the editor responsible for this story: Edward Evans at eevans3@bloomberg.net This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners. Elisa Martinuzzi is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering finance. She is a former managing editor for European finance at Bloomberg News. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion ©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
bernie37
31/5/2019
10:01
With UK banks making heavy weather of Q1 results and the Brexit shackles still in place, there's a clear lack of momentum behind shares of Lloyds Banking Group (LSE:LLOY), Barclays (LSE:BARC) and The Royal Bank of Scotland (LSE:RBS) as we head towards the second half of 2019. But as the dust settles on a lacklustre set of quarterly earnings, it's worth remembering that there are still analysts in the City who see reasons for optimism around domestic banks. They include UBS's banking expert Jason Napier, who after taking a closer look this week at the sector's Q1 performance has stuck to his 'buy' recommendations for Lloyds, Barclays and RBS. Significantly, he notes the trio offer free cash flow yields of between 8% for Barclays and 13% for RBS, compared with Asia-focused HSBC (LSE:HSBA) and Standard Chartered (LSE:STAN) trading at 5% to 6%. And whereas HSBC's reassuring and resilient Q1 performance puts it on a 33% price/earnings (PE) premium to the sector and more than double its 15-year average, the UK domestic banks are trading at fairly meaningful discounts to their longer term averages. It's not just UK stocks that pay big dividends. Check out these ii Super 60 recommended income funds Napier points out that this comes despite capital bases being fully rebuilt, and with clean balance sheets and the prospect of share buy-backs over the next 18 months. There's also the hope of a more favourable interest rate environment once Brexit uncertainty eases. In the meantime, however, UK domestic banks are finding the going tough after their Q1 earnings missed consensus forecasts by 4%. This was driven by revenues 3% to 6% below estimates, partially offset by a better performance on costs and impairments. Bank sector performance since FTSE 100 hit its 2019 peak on 23 April Source: TradingView Past performance is not a guide to future performance UBS's review of the results and various industry benchmarks point to some stability in conditions for the banks, although any recent suggestion that the squeeze on mortgage market profitability is easing appears wide of the mark. Despite the softer Q1 results, all UK banks have reiterated their return on tangible equity (ROTE) targets for 2019/20. UBS, however, thinks the market is expecting a material failure to deliver on these targets, meaning that Barclays, Lloyds and RBS are trading on between 6.6x and 7.9x current year earnings per share. Lloyds Banking Group Q1 2019 results in 90 seconds Star fund manager talks top stocks and bank shares Napier said: "On our numbers, which assume that the banks fall short of their ROTE objectives, principally due to lower-than-planned revenues, Lloyds and Barclays are the sixth and seventh cheapest stocks in our coverage." Lloyds anticipates a return on equity figure of between 14% and 15% in 2019, compared with 12.5% in the most recent quarter. Its tight control of the business has already enabled a share buyback of £1.75 billion, alongside a dividend yield of above 5%. The recent announcement from regulators on the systemic risk buffer requirement for UK's ring-fenced banks should give Lloyds more room to move in terms of future shareholder returns. Some analysts think this could increase the capacity for share buy-backs by £1 billion in 2019. Napier, meanwhile, thinks RBS is capable of returning £6 billion in capital to shareholders in 2019, equivalent to around 20% of its market cap. He expects part of this capital to be devoted to an off-market repurchase of 5% of the company from the Treasury, taking the government's stake down to 57%. His price target for RBS is 290p, with Lloyds Banking Group priced at 75p and Barclays at 220p.
bernie37
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