Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
XG Tech LSE:XGTU London Ordinary Share US98372A3095 COM STK USD0.00001 (DI)
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +$0.00 +0.00% $1.50 $0.00 $0.00 - - - 0.00 05:00:10
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Technology Hardware & Equipment - - - - 1.66

XG Tech Share Discussion Threads

Showing 76 to 96 of 100 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
29/5/2013
06:31
I hear the NASDAQ roadshow started yesterday
looky
18/2/2013
15:05
Aabout $16m in new contracts already this year, ceo targeting 100m. illiquid (once rose 100% in a day), tightly held and relatively low share price just now eg last story on this link: Feb 15 2013: According to Rich Schubiger, xG Vice President of Sales, "We have a pipeline that's north of $100 million right now. We've identified the opportunity. We've identified that we do have a solution that fits the needs of the customer, and we've identified a funding solution. Between short and long term, that number is north of $100 million." http://www.xgtechnology.com/blog/
andrbea
15/2/2013
10:36
More deals are expected in the future, according to Rich Schubiger, vice president of sales for xG Technology. "We have a pipeline that's north of $100 million right now," Schubiger said during an interview. "We've identified the opportunity. We've identified that we do have a solution that fits the needs of the customer, and we've identified a funding solution. Between short and long term, that number is north of $100 million. "Short term, it's heavily weighted with public-safety and rural-broadband opportunities. From the enterprise side, there's education, healthcare and utilities."
andrbea
15/2/2013
10:33
January 16, 2013 xG Technology Receives New Purchase Commitments Worth $6M for xMax By Shankar Pandiath xG Technology Inc., a developer of a broad portfolio of wireless communications technologies including cognitive radio networks, has just received new purchase commitments for $6 million from several established wireless solutions providers for its xMax cognitive radio networking equipment. http://www.mobilitytechzone.com/topics/4g-wirelessevolution/articles/2013/01/16/323215-xg-technology-receives-new-purchase-commitments-worth-6m.htm
andrbea
14/2/2013
16:57
SARASOTA, Fla., Feb. 4, 2013 /PRNewswire/ – xG® Technology, Inc. ("xG" or the "Company") (AIM: XGTU.L, XGT.L), the developer of a portfolio of wireless communications technologies, including cognitive radio networks, is pleased to announce that it has received a new purchase order for $1,030,750 from Assist Wireless, LLC ("Assist Wireless"), a Fort Worth, TX-based Eligible Telecommunications Carrier (ETC) to deploy xMax wireless voice and broadband services in Tahlequah, Oklahoma and surrounding Cherokee county. http://www.dailymarkets.com/stock/2013/02/04/xg-technology-inc-receives-1030750-purchase-order-for-xmax-broadband-network-equipment-from-assist-wireless/
andrbea
18/1/2013
13:47
reckon (illiquid) xgtu is worth a re-rating. they have (for almost the first time ever) a full order book: These purchase orders bring the total announced backlog of orders for xMax equipment and services to over $14.5 million and highlight the growing appeal of xG's technology in different business sectors. Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/01/14/3181926/xg-technology-receives-6000000.html#storylink=cpy
andrbea
15/1/2013
07:45
Cornet Technology, Inc. enters into agreement to resell xMax mobile broadband equipment
andrbea
14/1/2013
09:29
http://xgtechnology.com/blog/
andrbea
14/1/2013
09:28
January 14, 2013 xG Technology, Inc. ("xG", "xG Technology" or the "Company") xG Technology receives $6,000,000 in new purchase commitments for xMax broadband network equipment from established wireless solutions providers xG(R) Technology, the developer of a broad portfolio of wireless communications technologies, including cognitive radio networks, is pleased to announce that it has received new purchase commitments, for $6,000,000 in total, from the following wireless solutions providers: PMC Associates (based in Hazlet, New Jersey), Communications Marketing Southeast (based in Dallas, Georgia) and Mobile-One Communications (based in Venice, Florida) (together the "Providers"). These established Providers add to the growing ecosystem of industry participants that xG is assembling to bring xMax solutions to multiple vertical markets. The orders, in aggregate, total a minimum of $6,000,000 for xMax cognitive radio networking equipment, including xMax wireless access points, xMSC mobile switching centers and xMod personal hotspots (capable of supporting existing smartphones, tablets and laptops). Fulfillment of these orders will enable the Providers to offer xMax wireless voice and advanced broadband equipment and services to their customers. These purchase orders bring the total announced backlog of orders for xMax equipment and services to over $14.5 million and highlight the growing appeal of xG's technology in different business sectors. While the previous orders were received from firms focused on the rural telecom and homeland security markets, the Providers placing the new purchase commitments provide wireless communications to a variety of sectors. PMC Associates brings together over 150 years of combined industry experience to specialize in two-way radio communications for federal, state and local public safety agencies, transportation, schools, utilities, as well as business and industry. "We have seen a growing market need for highly reliable mobile broadband networking that can work in license-free spectrum bands. xMax finally enables us to meet this pent-up demand and deliver a real high-performance, high-value solution to our customers," said Philip Casciano, President of PMC Associates. Communications Marketing Southeast is a multiple line manufacturer's representative that was founded in 1977 and specializes in wireless communications. Jason Bentley, General Manager of Communications Marketing Southeast said: "Our firm is focused on partnering with manufacturers that deliver cutting-edge wireless solutions. We are very excited to be a part of the xG team and look forward to expanding the markets for their innovative technology." Mobile-One Communications specializes in the design and implementation of integrated communications and security systems. They were founded in 1988 and serve clientele in public safety, education, utilities, government, gaming & casinos, hospitality, transportation, logistics, manufacturing and healthcare. Mike Loncar, President of Mobile-One, said: "Mobile-One is committed to providing the best-in-class solutions to our diverse customer base. We believe xG's xMax cognitive radio system offers a new level of performance, flexibility and value in addressing client needs." Commenting on the announcement, Rich Schubiger, Vice President of Sales for xG, said: "We are very pleased to establish relationships with these respected and innovative wireless solutions providers. xG is committed to building strong dealer, integrator and manufacturer's representative sales channels that are both broad and deep in scope. Agreements such as these announced today demonstrate our expanding market traction and ability to penetrate a growing number of vertical sectors." Under the terms of the orders, xG will be paid upon the delivery of FCC certified xMax equipment to the Providers, which is expected to commence in the second quarter of 2013.
andrbea
14/1/2013
09:27
ARASOTA, FL--(Marketwire - Nov 27, 2012) - xG® Technology, Inc. ("xG" or the "Company") ( AIM : XGTU.L ) ( AIM : XGT.L ), the developer of a portfolio of wireless communications technologies, including cognitive radio networks, is pleased to announce that it has received new purchase orders, for an estimated $4.11 million, from the following rural telecommunications providers: Electra Telephone Company and Tatum Telephone Company (both based in Texas); Choctaw Telephone Company and MoKanDial Telephone Company (both based in Kansas); Haxtun Telephone Company (based in Colorado); and Walnut Hill Telephone Company (based in Arkansas) (together, the "Providers"). The orders, in aggregate, consist of $2.85 million for xMax cognitive radio networking equipment, including xMax wireless access points, xMSC mobile switching centers and xMod personal hotspots (capable of supporting existing smartphones, tablets and laptops) and an estimated $1.26 million for engineering services and other hardware. Fulfillment of these orders will enable the Providers to offer wireless voice and advanced broadband services in their respective regulated telephone market areas. These purchase orders follow a separate $3.28 million order for xMax broadband network equipment and services received by xG from Florida-based Northeast Florida Telephone Company, Inc. ("NEFCOM"), a provider of local phone, long distance, Internet services and telephone equipment, which was announced on September 5, 2012 (the "NEFCOM contract"). The orders arise from a previous xMax trial conducted with Townes Tele-Communications, Inc. ("Townes"), the parent company of the Providers, originally announced on March 15, 2011. Commenting on the announcement, Larry Townes, Chairman and CEO of Townes, said: "Echoing my earlier remarks on the NEFCOM contract, I look forward to the successful deployment of xG's technology by Townes operating companies and particularly anticipate the delivery of reasonably-priced broadband services in these important rural markets as a result." George Schmitt, xG Non-Executive Director, said: "We are very pleased to have received new orders from these Providers. This announcement provides further evidence that xMax offers a compelling wireless solution for independent telephone providers in their efforts to bring advanced, cost-effective wireless technology to unserved and underserved areas of the United States." Under the terms of the orders and as with the NEFCOM contract, xG will be paid upon the delivery of xMax equipment to the Providers and, following FCC certification of the Radio Frequency (RF) devices, which is now expected to take place, in respect of both the NEFCOM contract and the new orders described in this announcement, in the first quarter of 2013.
andrbea
13/11/2012
13:34
XG Technology granted 2 wireless patents STAFF REPORT Published: Monday, November 12, 2012 at 5:11 p.m. Last Modified: Monday, November 12, 2012 at 5:11 p.m. SARASOTA - XG Technology Inc. said it has been granted two new patents related to self-organizing networks, or SONs. http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20121112/ARTICLE/121119873
andrbea
30/10/2012
17:29
article from a month ago (ends with) AT&T, who has relied heavily on Wi-Fi offloading, is being pummeled by smartphones and tablets, yet it has its own plans for building out network capacity over the next five years which don't involve spectrum sharing. With each new iPhone and iPad, data consumption skyrockets approximately 4,000 percent a year, and the carrier might be forced to its own crisis point where it has to consider xG's idea. http://betanews.com/2012/09/17/incumbent-mentality-is-driving-the-wireless-communications-industry-to-the-crisis-point/
andrbea
30/10/2012
17:27
this was from Sept 2012 they need cerification (due in Q4) http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20120906/ARTICLE/309069991
andrbea
23/10/2012
18:25
US buyers coming in. Interesting!
looky
22/10/2012
14:41
http://pinterest.com/xgtechnologyinc/spectrum-crisis/
andrbea
19/10/2012
08:29
http://xgtechnology.com/blog/
andrbea
11/10/2012
07:49
Early days, but I like the look of this company's technology.
goodgrief
11/10/2012
07:21
Early next year in a swath of northern Florida, as many as 8,000 people will be able to get 4G wireless broadband with a twist: the service will beam over a frequency normally used by gadgets like garage-door openers and baby monitors. The project at Northeast Florida Telephone, using gear from a startup called XG Technology of Sarasota, Florida, appears to be the first commercial use of cognitive radio, which senses available frequencies and switches between them on the fly. Cognitive radios are now used mainly by the military. The technology is one of many creative approaches that will be needed to forestall a spectrum shortage triggered by the boom in super-fast smartphones. U.S. mobile data traffic quadrupled last year. /... Craig Partridge, chief scientist for networking research at Raytheon BBN Technologies in Cambridge, Massachusetts, says the Florida deal will mark the first commercial use of cognitive radios and will highlight the fact that the technology has "an important role to play in the commercial sector." The Florida carrier is one of about 1,300 U.S. carriers serving rural areas that may never get full coverage from giants like AT&T and Verizon. The FCC is subsidizing myriad efforts to fill these gaps. Last week, for example, it announced $300 million in grants to bring mobile broadband to rural areas that include 83,000 miles of roadway (see "635,392 U.S. Road Miles Lack 3G or 4G.") http://www.technologyreview.com/news/429543/4g-on-the-baby-monitor-frequency/
andrbea
11/7/2012
10:20
patent office awards six patents to xG Technology Sarasota's xG Technology Inc. has been granted six new patents in the past three months. The patents cover a wide range of wireless communications technology innovations including improvements in the area of spectrum sharing, media access control, mobile voice over IP signaling and interference detection/mitigation. As of June 11, xG Technology held 33 U.S. patents and had another 29 patents pending. The company holds 143 foreign patents. http://www.review.net/section/detail/corporate-report-july-6/
andrbea
07/6/2012
05:46
More on the US spectrum issue - XG seem to have an answer. High risk but huge reward if it is right. Martin Cooper, the former vice president of Motorola who helped create the first working cellphone, has been saying for some time that technology is the solution to dealing with the ever-rising demand for wireless data capacity. Now a presidential advisory committee agrees with him, urging President Obama to adopt technologies that would use radio spectrum more efficiently. Wireless carriers argue that they need more spectrum, not just better-managed spectrum. An edited transcript of an interview with Mr. Cooper follows. Q. Spectrum-sharing technology - is this what you've been talking about the entire time? A. The committee is proposing the approach that I've been advocating for over 20 years. The magic that makes all of this work is already known. It's several technologies that, put together, are called dynamic spectrum access. The high-level principle is simple. Today, almost all of the spectrum is unused when one thinks about time, geographic area and frequency band. For example, the F.C.C. assigns a radio channel to an operator. A person makes a cellphone call on that channel. The channel is reserved for that person over the entire area of the cell and for the duration of the call whether he is speaking or not. The entire area covered by a cell station is flooded with the energy from the one call. Suppose the information in the call could be transmitted directly from the person to the cell station. Then many people could talk on their phone in the coverage area of each station without interfering with each other. Further, when the person is not talking, others could use the channel. The technology that lets many people use the same radio channel at the same time is called smart antenna technology or adaptive array technology or interference mitigation. This technology uses computer processors to take the signals from multiple antennas at each location and sorts the various signals out so they don't interfere with each other. Add to that the technology the committee refers to, and someone desiring to make a call has a way of detecting whether there is some free radio spectrum, a free radio channel, available in his location that will not interfere with other people. The technology that senses whether a channel is available is known as cognitive radio. The technology that allows the cellular radios to use any of a large number of channels is called software-defined radio, or frequency-agile radio. Smart antenna technology has been available for almost 20 years but is not yet used by cellular operators. Cognitive radio technology is still in the early stages of development but could be available in five to 10 years. All radios today are software defined, but their agility is not yet adequate; that will take five years or longer. The bottom line is, yes, it's all technology that makes the use of the spectrum more efficient. I've been literally doing that for my whole career when I started at Motorola in 1954. The issue was, we didn't have enough spectrum for two-way radios. We didn't have enough spectrum for the police departments, the taxicabs and the plumbers; we were struggling to make our two-way radios more efficient, which we did with all kinds of technologies back in the 1950s. It's a never-ending battle. People are mobile. They move around, and anytime they want to communicate, if you tie them to the wall or the wires, you're restricting them, you're infringing on their freedom. The more we learn about new communications, the more capacity we need, and that is going to keep going on forever. That's happening since radio is invented, and that's going to keep going. The only way to solve that is by new technology. You can't create new spectrum. Q. The report concludes that the radio spectrum could be used as much as 40,000 times as efficiently as it is currently, and increase capacity a thousandfold. That sounds dramatic. Is it feasible? A. Doubling every two and a half years is Cooper's Law. You don't have to double very much to get to 40,000. When they say 40,000 times, that's not going to happen immediately. It's going to take 20 years. That's a million times more spectrum. It's a matter of time: None of these things happen instantaneously. It's going on every 10 years. Each time you put in new technology you get a big jump. The immediate jump they can get is 10 or 20 times. You combine smart antennas, cognitive radio, and the processors get better - all of these techniques require computer processors. As the processors get more powerful, the more efficient they get and they're able to do more spectrally efficient techniques. It's all continual. Little by little you add technologies, you improve the processing, you try a different technique and you get incremental improvement. Q. The carriers wonder whether the cognitive-radio technology described in the report is commercially available or scalable. What do you know about it? How does it work? A. It's true, it's not commercially available. The biggest problem I have in these committees is, you've got a bunch of lawyers and lobbyists and they keep talking about cognitive radio, which I would say is 10 years away. This interference mitigation with smart antennas, these are systems that have been operating for 10 years that are 20 times more efficient than what the carriers are doing today. But cognitive radio is in development, and by all means it's feasible. But it's a red herring. It's feasible and can be used only in certain bands right now because the law doesn't permit it. Cognitive radio is really simple. An example: You have two television stations, one in Philadelphia and one in New York. Here's a guy who wants to send a two-way radio transmission somewhere in between those two in New Jersey. He takes a receiver and he sniffs. He tries to hear if there's any television signal there. If there's no signal there he'll determine he can send a signal. The cognitive part is he's listening, to be aware of whether somebody is in the spectrum, to know whether you're going to interfere with the other guy sharing the spectrum between two different services. No. 1, you've got a technical problem - we haven't figured that out yet. The second is the law doesn't provide for that, so the law has to be changed. Cognitive radio is one example of why it's the magic word among the lobbyists and lawyers who have no idea what it is, and it doesn't exist yet. It's a matter of what has been demonstrated. In a dozen countries there are systems using smart antennas that are at least 20 times more spectrum efficient. Why aren't we doing that? We've got this new system, LTE, and that has the capability of doing it, but nobody is using it yet. Q. The wireless industry says that even if this technology pans out, they still want the government to "clear" additional spectrum for them. Why would they need more? A. I keep repeating this: How can 20 percent more spectrum - which is in their wildest dreams as much as they're ever going to get - how can that solve the problem when you need 20 times more spectrum? You can't. They've got to be pushing harder on technology. They're not using technology that exists today and was demonstrated 10 years ago. Q. We know who the winners would be if spectrum sharing came to fruition. Who would be the losers? A. The big winner is the public. The object is not only spectrum, it's getting the cost down. The public interest is low-cost access to spectrum. Everybody can benefit from it. As you know, they [the carriers] stopped doing all-you-can-eat. Even the people providing all-you-can-eat charge a lot of money for it. The objective is to have very low-cost spectrum. My belief is that everybody wins. It's competition. The more competition you have, the harder people fight to serve your customers, and the lower the costs get and the more service they get. How can you get more fundamental than that? Q. The presidential committee's proposal is a big step, but what's missing from it? A. The only place I've been urging the government to act is, they ought to be putting more pressure on existing users of the spectrum to use the spectrum more effectively. There are ways of measuring how well an operator or a broadcaster, how efficiently they're using it. And if you can measure it, you can tell them, hey, we the public own the spectrum. You don't own it, you just license it. If you don't use it efficiently, we're going to take it back. That's what they should be doing. The amazing thing is there's so much technology that's becoming available, it's not as though you have to imagine that maybe something is going to happen. The technology that we already know about can be the short-term solutions. We know the technologies that we're working on that will be the next generation. I try to protect these future technologies - I have a technology road map that goes on to way beyond my lifetime of things that are on the schedule that we've got to be working on. So it all fits together very neatly if we get around the politics and the self-interest.
looky
31/5/2012
14:06
Presidential Panel Urges More Flexible Use of Spectrum The New York Times By John Markoff May 26, 2012 SAN FRANCISCO - A just-completed report from a presidential advisory committee urges President Obama to adopt new computer technologies to make better use of a huge swath of the radio spectrum now controlled by federal agencies. The shift, which could be accomplished by presidential signature - and without Congressional involvement - would relieve spectrum congestion caused by the popularity of smartphones, and generate far more revenue for the federal government than auctioning spectrum to wireless carriers, according to the authors of the report. Making better use of the spectrum for cellphones would allow for more services, more competition and possibly lower prices for consumers using cellphone data services. The new plan, which calls on the government to electronically rent or lease spectrum for periods of time as short as seconds using newly available computerized radio technologies, was presented publicly Friday to a meeting of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, or PCAST. The authors of the report included Eric E. Schmidt, the chairman of Google, Craig Mundie, Microsoft's chief research and strategy officer and Silicon Valley venture capitalists Mark P. Gorenberg and David E. Liddle, among others. The report is scheduled to be presented to the president in June after final editing. The idea of using computer-based technologies to increase spectrum capacity is catching on rapidly in the United States and overseas. Twice this month in speeches before cellular and cable companies Julius Genachowski, the Federal Communications Commission chairman, has called on industry to embrace spectrum-sharing technologies to make room for the wireless data explosion. The report is a response to a 2010 memorandum by President Obama calling on federal agencies to find ways to clear 500 megahertz of spectrum to make way for the growth of new wireless services during the next decade. He believes freeing the spectrum will promote economic growth. The authors cite a recent European study that found that freeing 400 megahertz of radio spectrum to be shared using new technologies would be equivalent to an economic financial stimulus of 800 billion euros. According to Mr. Gorenberg, who presented the report on Friday before the committee, the amount of wireless data that has been transmitted by the growing legions of smartphones and wirelessly connected tablets has doubled every year for the last four years. He said that there would be as many as 50 billion devices transmitting and receiving wireless data by 2020, leading many in the wireless industry to forecast a spectrum crisis. However, he said that the committee's authors believed that agile radio technologies that make it possible for computerized radio systems to share spectrum on a vastly more efficient basis would make it possible to move from an era of scarcity to one of abundance. The central point of the report is that while there is no new spectrum available, new technologies can vastly increase the capacity of existing spectrum. The report concludes that the radio spectrum could be used as much as 40,000 times as efficiently as it is currently and the committee recommends an approach that could increase capacity 1,000 fold, Mr. Gorenberg said. "We're living with spectrum that is of a policy that was really set in motion by technology of 100 years ago," he said. "That's led to a fragmentation of the spectrum that has led to inefficiency and artificial scarcity." Except for several unlicensed frequencies established by the Federal Communications Commission that gave rise to data services like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, today much of the radio spectrum is licensed to both commercial users and government agencies who have no incentive to use the spectrum they control efficiently, he said. The new radio technology was pioneered during the late 1990s and is described as "cognitive" or "agile" radio. Such computer-controlled radios inside a cellphone can rapidly switch the frequencies they broadcast and receive on based on an arbitrary set of rules. One analogy to describe the technology might be a freeway system, in which individual vehicles could quickly switch lanes or drive more closely together. The report, which is titled "Realizing the Full Potential of Government-Held Spectrum to Spur Economic Growth," calls for a tiered system in which different users would have different priority, possibly based on whether they were a government user, a user who was prepared to pay more for a higher quality-of-service," or a casual user who might be assigned the lowest priority and pay the lowest rate. Unlike today's unlicensed Wi-Fi spectrum, which can be used freely, the newly available spectrum would require devices "register" in a database that would then control the terms of their access to the spectrum. "One of the reasons we think we will see this dramatic economic expansion around radio-based systems in the future is that we can have a dramatic lowering of the apparent cost of gaining access and that will be facilitated by the registration system," Mr. Mundie said. The report also calls on the president to create a "synthetic" currency that could be used to entice federal agencies into offering more spectrum to the system. "The agencies don't have an incentive to move forward," he said. "We think a carrot approach is a much better approach." The proposed system would in effect increase an agency's budget if it was willing to give up, or share its spectrum. In response to questions after his presentation, Mr. Gorenberg said that foreign competitors were already aware of the potential economic value of the new radio technologies and that the United States was in a contest to develop systems quickly. "I think this is a worldwide race," he said. "There are people looking at this everywhere. This is something that is very important to the U.S. to lead here to have our vendors out front so they can export their products overseas." He warned that if the United States failed competitively, the nation would likely see a repeat of the situation in the early 1990s when advanced digital cellular standards were created first in Europe.
looky
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