Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Vitesse Media LSE:VIS London Ordinary Share GB0006563406 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -0.125p -3.33% 3.625p 3.50p 3.75p 3.75p 3.625p 3.75p 0 11:58:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Media 2.1 -0.2 -0.4 - 1.83

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Date Time Title Posts
21/10/201608:26VITESSE - Chris Ingram takes a 26% stake68
29/5/201611:04VIS - Graphs 90
05/5/201614:04Vitesse Media110
04/7/201122:09Investing with Vis1,823
17/9/201011:57VIS - gruel tomorrow?14

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Vitesse Media Daily Update: Vitesse Media is listed in the Media sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker VIS. The last closing price for Vitesse Media was 3.75p.
Vitesse Media has a 4 week average price of 3.73p and a 12 week average price of 4p.
The 1 year high share price is 4.88p while the 1 year low share price is currently 1.13p.
There are currently 50,607,873 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 24,000 shares. The market capitalisation of Vitesse Media is £1,834,535.40.
safman: Good Morning.. share price taking a bit of a hit... I see that as a opportunity.. however.. we shall see where sellers take this.. saffy..
safman: Holding >> 1% around 1.1% No need to chase the share price up.... saffy..
bckttsim: Exciting times. You just know the share price is heading into orbit. Nothing better than speculation on what may happen here. Over to you Mr Ingram.One thing is for curtain , it won't have a M/C of £1.2 mil for very much longer.
mr multibagger: AIM listed TomCo Energy PLC [TOM] TomCo holds significant strategic Oil Shale reserves in the Green River Formation of Utah. Recent geological reports received by the company have shown that these oil shale leases have projected oil reserves of approximately 230 million barrels. The Company's strategy is two-pronged: Firstly to hold the TomCo leases as a long term asset to be exploited when the commercial conditions are suitable, expected to be within 6 years. Secondly, to acquire and develop conventional oil assets in the USA. Led by Howard Crosby and John Ryan, the Company will concentrate principally on acquiring participations in shallow producing oil wells and proven drilling prospects, principally by leveraging their expertise and extensive industry contacts. TomCo will invest in oil properties with fully engineered, proven, developed producing wells (PDPS) and proven undeveloped locations (PUDS). These smaller acquisitions can be obtained at prices that would give Tomco significant profit potential. Based on the experience gained from Cadence Resources more oil than gas production will be purchased due to the much quicker pay back time. Both CEO Howard Crosby and CFO John Ryan have superb track records in the natural resources sector in the USA with their latest company [NASDAQ listed Cadence Resources] for example being a serious multi bagger [MKT CAP went from under $500K to $450M within 5 years before being taken over although it should be pointed out that $40M or so was raised on the way]. Based on the experience gained from Cadence Resources the financing for the upcoming TomCo Energy oil deals really does seem to be a very misunderstood area, but the fact is that most of the financing comes in the form of non equity! For example debt secured against the oil production with only relatively small amounts of equity required is one of the main and most obvious ways. There are also of course other forms of "non-equity" financing deals that can be done. For example a group of investors could put in X amount of millions of $'s in return for a very attractive slice of the action [majority] whilst TomCo Energy still get well rewarded [significant minority] without having to put any money up....only the well known skills of Howard Crosby and his gang of Oilers with sh*t all over their boots! Howard Crosby and John Ryan are looking to grow TomCo Energy PLC to at least the same size as Cadence Resources Inc over the next few years.....which would equate to a share price of more than 50p...and then throw in the oil shale leases and £1+ is more than possible! And all for only 2p!
dunderheed: He's probably too busy buying more sia - as they're such good value now!! Not putting the share down at all - just the fact that recently he bought down to take advantage of the temporary 'low' share price - only for them to be lower now than that purchase price now!! So what do you do - no doubt pop up later to say that they'd been bought at the intra-day low!!
invisage: you'll see I take a more pragmatic view of the NAV's I noticed. Bridgewell released a note yesterday for SIA "Bridgewell raise NAV to 1564p" I have respect for Al Stanton, he seems to understand oil companies better then most analysts. have the utmost respect for the mgt - they are very very good. I could'nt agree with you more on that one. The key to investing in oil compainies imho is good management. And cagle and story have good track records. I suspect they will also do very well in West Africa hence why i am not in any rush to sell, regardless of what oil price does or how silly the market decides to take the share price. I can still see huge upside in SIA with small risk.
invisage: For me buying stocks is like buying houses. If i can get the buying price right then i have little chance of losing money. Still not certain that i wont lose money, i just reduce the risk. I reduce the risk by : a) Look for a margin of safety b) Look for catalysts that will drive the share price higher and higher in coming years Finding stocks of that calibre is no easy job and requires alot of digging, the above is simply stated but more difficult to do. If you can manage the risk well in this game you can make superior returns and small losses.
invisage: Here is SOME of my criteria for stock picking, not all of it is there. But Anthony Bolton is a Top man at Fidelity, i have yet to read his book! Probably should have done that rather then trade the markets past week... Anthony Boltons Top 16 Share Tips 16 tips from Anthony Bolton, fund manager of Fidelity's special situation fund. Bolton attibutes much of his success to his contrarian stance. He says "For some reason I have always felt happier going against the crowd and generally feel uncomfortable doing what everyone else is doing". 1) Understand the business franchise and its quality - Businesses vary greatly in quality and sustainability. It is essential to understand the business, how it makes money and its competitive position. 2) Understand the key variables that drive a business - Identify key variables that affect a company's performance, in particular, those it cannot control, such as currencies, interest rates and tax changes. 3) Favour simple businesses over complex businesses - If a business is complex, it will be hard to work out if it has a sustainable franchise. 4) Hear directly from the management - Candidness and lack of hyperbole are the key management attributes to look for. I like managers who do not overpromise but then consistently deliver a bit more than they indicated. Be most wary of those who promise the sky - they are unlikely to deliver. 5) Avoid dodgy management at all costs - The dynamics of a strong-looking business never make up for dodgy management. Managements that are either unethical or that sail close to the wind are complete no-go areas. 6) Try to think two moves ahead of the crowd - Try to identify what is being ignored today which could re-excite in the future. The stockmarket does not look very far ahead and, therefore, somewhat like chess, looking a bit further than others can often pay dividends. 7) Understand the balance sheet risk - If the stockpicker has to learn only one lesson, this has to be near the top of the list. If investment is about limiting the downside and avoiding disaster, taking on balance sheet risk should only be done with one's eyes open. 8) Seek ideas from a wider range of sources - The more sources to pick ideas from, the more chances you have of finding a winner. The most obvious sources are not always best. 9) Watch closely the dealing by company insiders - The dealings by the directors of companies are a valuable tool. Director buying is more significant than director selling. 10) Re-examine your investment thesis at regular intervals - Investment management is all about building a conviction for an investment opportunity and then re-examining this conviction over time, especially when new information arises. 11) Forget the price you paid for the shares - The price you paid is totally irrelevant, it is only psychologically important. Have no hesitation in cutting losses if the situation changes. 12) Past performance attribution is a waste of time - If life is about making mistakes and learning from them, so too is the stockmarket. Past performance, although very fashionable, mainly involves looking in the rear view mirror and tells you nothing about the future. 13) Pay attention to absolute valuations - Investors need some sort of reality check to avoid being sucked in to a stock at times of great exuberance. Looking at absolute valuations at times like this will help. 14) Use technical analysis as an extra indicator - View it as a framework for help in decision-making. It is one of the factors which helps me decide the size of the bet I take and I use it as a confirming or denying factor. 15) Avoid market timing and major macro bets - I have only had a strong market view perhaps five or six times over the last 25 years. Even then, I would not bet my fund on that view. 16) Be a contrarian - If the investment feels comfortable, you are probably late. Try to invest against the crowd. Avoid getting more bullish as the share price rises. When nearly everyone is cautious about the outlook, they are probably wrong and things are going to get better. Equally, when very few are worried, that is the time to be most wary.
yuka: I'm wasn't talking about the fundamentals. You said you added because the share price "looks to be recovering" which I couldn't see. If it a pure play on fundamentals fair enough but don't pretend the share price is recovering. Ditto it wasn't when you added before.
invisage: Market Makers- the official version 1. What are Market Makers? a. What are Market Makers? i. Market Makers are companies who have agreed with their clients and who have been approved by regulators to "Make a market" in the shares of the client. b. Who are the Market Makers? i. They are usually large international banking organisations, usually with thousands if not tens of thousands of employees' worldwide. c. What is the job of a Market Maker? i. Simply it is to make a market, i.e. to ensure that there is always a market in which investors can buy and sell shares of the clients they are Market Makers for. d. Who is a Market Maker responsible to? i. Their shareholders. ii. Their clients. iii. The broker with whom they are entering into a contract with. iv. Whilst not strictly "responsible to" the regulator the Market Maker has to be able to demonstrate that the obvious conflict of interests arising from this list are dealt with in an appropriate manner, and that no one is especially advantaged or disadvantaged. e. What is a client in the Market Maker context? i. The client is the quoted company. Quoted companies have contracts with the Market Makers in their stock. They are usually large international banking organisations, usually with thousands if not tens of thousands of employees' worldwide. 2. Market Manipulation or doing their job? a. Do Market Makers manipulate the market? i. "Market Manipulation" is an emotive term, and conjurors images of shady deals and exploitation. Market Makers are not elusive companies that appear then vanish overnight. Market Makers are duty bound to make a market and to meet the needs of those they are responsible to (See 1d.) to this end they may try to influence the market. b. How Do Market Makers make their money? i. Market Makers make money from buying shares at a lower price to which they sell them. This is the bid/offer spread. (See 4.) The more actively a share is traded the more money a Market Maker makes. c. Surely a Market Maker raising/lowering the price on news/rumour without any buying or selling is manipulating the market? i. No, not really. If the Market Maker was to keep the price steady on the release of news they would find themselves with lots of buys or sells which they had no choice but to fulfil at the screen price but before they could find matching orders (buys for sells, sells for buys) they would have to change the price and they would then loose money through market exposure. This is bad for them and for us. (See 3.) d. Why do Market Makers raise prices on Monday morning for shares tipped in the Sunday press? i. This is the same as question 2c, because the Market Maker needs to ensure that there are enough sellers to fulfil the needs of the buyers responding to the tips. e. Suppose my screen shows all sells and the price is increasing, what is the Market Maker doing? i. An explanation of this phenomenon is given for Tadpole, which very briefly shot up to 73p before settling back comfortably to the 50p support level. The likeliest explanation is that the Market Maker had an Institutional order to fill and no stock to fill it with (this trade would not have shown up on peoples screen until somewhat later), under thier obligations to create liquidity in the share the Market Maker is obliged to gather a stock holding, only possible if they can encourage people to sell, which can be achieved by raising the price. The order is likely to have been large enough to be significantly outside the NMS thus allowing the Market Maker to gather a fairly significant premium on the price (probably being some-where between 50p and 73p allowing the Market Maker to offset gains against losses and still profit). Once the order is filled and the market volumes return to thier "normal" levels, so does the share price. f. Do Market Makers ever lower prices to "panic" investors into selling, sometimes called "shaking the tree"? i. Yes, moving the price up, encourages sells, moving it down also encourage sells, take another look at Tadpole, in the first instance, the price was hiked way up despite the 50p support level, but at 50p few of the people who got in between 20p and 45p are going to sell (and look how many buyers there were still at 50p), the rise was meteoric, smart money just ignored it as it only lasted about 2 hours, but what was probably caught was huge investors who were in way before 20p and had forgotten about it, now they want out. The Market Makers order gets filled, the price settles back to a smart support level and volumes decrease, however the Market Makers gets another order to fill, maybe not so big, maybe not so prepared to pay the premium, but you also know that there are a lot of people out there waiting to see if it's going to shoot up past the 50p support level again or dip and if it dips they're going to sell now before it dips back past their 100% profit level. g. Surely delaying the posting of trades is Market Manipulation? i. This was allowed as part of the SETS trading system when institutional investors pointed out that with 100% transparency, any other institutional investor would be able to trade against that position which would put their client holdings in jeopardy. Further, with 100% transparency, if it could be seen that an institutional investor was (for whatever reason) adjusting a large holding in a particular company it could also scare private investors into selling or alternatively encourage them to invest without doing thier own research. Both scenarios lead to either over- or under-selling and an inaccurate reflection of the company in the share price as a direct result. h. Do Market Makers try to reduce volatility? i. Sometimes, usually at the request of the client (see 1e), this is mostly done by increasing the bid/offer spread therefore discouraging trading especially by day traders and also by marketing the clients shares to institutions in the hope they will take up long term positions. ii. By asking their client to reduce the number of news releases. i. Do Market Makers encourage liquidity? i. Yes, partly because they have a duty to their client to ensure an active marking in their clients shares, and partly because they have a duty to their shareholders, it is only through trading/liquidity that Market Makers make money. j. How do Market Makers encourage liquidity? i. Partly just by being there, by being the enabler to liquidity, they will always buy or sell shares if you want to. ii. By narrowing spreads. iii. By encouraging their client to produce news releases. 3. Are Market Makers risk adverse? a. Does a Market Maker hold "stocks" of the shares they make a market in? i. No. Market Makers are there to make a market, not to act as some form of stock control system. At any one time a Market Maker is likely to have a position in the stocks they are the Market Makers for, but this position could just as easily be short as long. However having a position (of either persuasion gives market exposure and Market Makers try to avoid this.) (See 3d.) b. Can Market Makers take a short position? i. No and yes. Market Makers are not supposed to allow themselves to go short, but in process of making a market they may well find themselves short of a stock. If this happens a Market Maker has a number of options, purchase from another Market Maker, fiddle with the price in the hope that enough sellers will emerge to cover the short or borrow the shares from an institutional investor. c. What is market exposure? i. Market exposure is the amount of money you have exposed to the vagaries of the market, i.e. the amount of money you could loose or gain from your positions open in the market. d. Why do Market Makers avoid market exposure? i. Simply because a Market Maker who is over exposed to the market is giving systematic risk to the whole market. Ill explain... If a Market Maker was to take up lots of large position across the whole range of shares they make a market in then if there was a market crash the Market Maker may find themselves bankrupt (ala Nick Leeson and Barings) and therefore unable to make a market. Once there is no longer a market the shares will become pretty worthless (if you cant sell something, at any price, what is it worth?), this in turn could force other Market Makers to go bankrupt and the whole thing would spiral down into a very unpleasant mess. We would all loose vast amounts of money from our pensions, endowment policies, insurance funds, Unit Trusts, Investment Trust and direct equity investments, in addition to which an important source of cash for companies would vanish! 4. Prices; how do they work? a. What do the on screen prices reflect? i. The prices you see on screen are the best prices currently being offered by any and all the Market Makers for the share you are looking at. b. Why do spreads change? i. Market Makers can and do change their spreads, but nowhere near as often as you see the spread change on the screens. (See 2h.) ii. The main reason that spreads change on screen is because the screen shows you the best prices on offer. c. Why are some spreads so large? i. The stock may be very volatile and the Market Makers needs to protect themselves from sharp price movements and market exposure. ii. The client (see 1e.) may have asked the Market Makers to reduce volatility. iii. The price and NMS combination maybe so small that the Market Makers need a large spread to ensure that they cover their costs and make a profit. d. What's an inverted price? i. The prices you see are always "the best prices" it is possible that Market Maker A is offering to sell the shares for less than Market Maker B is offering to buy them at. Normally the reverse is true, so this is know as an "Inverted Price". e. Do Market Makers have to buy and sell at the quoted prices? i. Yes, so long as the quantity of shares you want to trade is equal to or less than the NMS. f. How come my broker can sometimes get a better price than those onscreen? i. Basically because Market Makers compete with one another for business. When your broker calls the Market Maker he is giving them the opportunity to 'bid' for the business, the Market Maker may well improve on the price on offer via the screens. The Market Maker only makes money when they are buying and selling, so the Market Maker will prefer to see the business go through their books at a reduce margin than allow it to go to another Market Maker. g. What is Normal Market Size (NMS)? i. It is the quantity of shares for which the Market Makers are quoting prices. IE for which the prices are valid. h. Why don't Market Makers set a price based on intrinsic value? i. The first person that comes up with a calculation that is 100% accurate for 100% of quoted companies is going to be very rich indeed. Market Makers no more 'know' the intrinsic value of share than you or I do. ii. If they got the calculation wrong everybody would be buying or everybody would be selling, leaving the Market Maker with huge market exposure. iii. Intrinsic value is still a notional value, since surely something is worth exactly as much as they highest bidder is willing to pay. iv. Many investors value "in fashion" shares at far more than the traditional "intrinsic" valuation methods would yield, again this would lead the Market Maker having huge market exposure. i. How come I don't see my trade listed? i. Trades for less than 3000 units don't have to be reported. ii. Some stocks don't have to have trades reported. iii. Your broker has batched up your trade with others. iv. Your trade was large enough to cause the Market Maker to treat it differently, it will be reported at a later stage. v. Your broker arranged the trade via an alternative to Market Makers. j. Do Market Makers make money from the raise or fall in share prices? i. Probably not. Market Makers make money from trading, at all times they try to minimise the open positions they have, so the actual price of a share is of little consequence to them. (See 3.)
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