Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Versarien LSE:VRS London Ordinary Share GB00B8YZTJ80 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.50p +2.50% 20.50p 20.00p 21.00p 20.50p 19.75p 20.00p 398,739.00 15:07:45
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Industrial Engineering 4.4 -1.8 -1.7 - 26.92

Versarien Share Discussion Threads

Showing 3251 to 3275 of 3275 messages
Chat Pages: 131  130  129  128  127  126  125  124  123  122  121  120  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
25/3/2017
09:59
All of that could have been in the RNS, but happy that it wasn't. All we need now are some orders to start the ball rolling, new budgets in April?!
luckyorange
25/3/2017
07:16
I just read the relevant ink paper but should have just jumped straight to the conclusion. However reading it did make me realise how difficult and complicated it could be to produce graphene inks. So with a furrowed brow it was nice to read the conclusion. We report a simple and scalable route to exfoliate graphite. The resulting material can be used without any additional steps (washing or centrifugation) to formulate highly conductive inks with adjustable viscosity for high-throughput printing. A conductivity of 2 × 104 S/m was demonstrated. Our approach enables the mass production of chemically unmodified flakes that can be used in inks, coatings, and conductive composites for a wide range of applications. So not just a huge breakthrough for inks but other areas too.
superg1
25/3/2017
07:00
Nippon Kayaku M/C $2.5 billion. I thought I'd have a hunt around old Cambridge graphene centre news January 2015 "Nippon Kayaku becomes an industrial partner of the Cambridge Graphene Centre" "Nippon Kayaku will support the Centre for Doctoral Training in Graphene Technology, focussing on the innovative use of graphene in applications that benefit Nippon Kayaku's business portfolio. The company specialises in advanced resin materials and polymers, and is researching the benefits to be achieved from the incorporation of graphene into its composite materials mix." Wiki "Major products made by Nippon Kayaku are: epoxy resins, UV-curing type resins, functional films, colors for inkjet printers, catalysts, dyes pharmaceuticals,"
superg1
25/3/2017
06:33
You have to admire Neill Ricketts and the team. Just over 2 months ago I didn't know Cambridge were doing graphene ink. VRS acquired it and initially I struggled to get to grips with what that could be all about and the potential market. At some point post acquisition I asked the status of the ink. R and D potential timelines to commercial and so on. The answer was simply 'ready to go'. Well any company can say that but if you get to know the CEO there is no BS and flowering it up. So in 2 months it's gone from acquired, scaled up and an order out of the door with more to follow. It seems they haven't even had time to give the ink a name yet. Now you know why the CEO and company is so well thought of and why such technology finds them.
superg1
24/3/2017
17:06
The next RNS should be letting us know about an order or two, could be Cambridge , 2D Tech or completely left field....... maybe :-)
luckyorange
24/3/2017
14:36
The Q and A from directors talk post ink scale up. Q1: Neill, we saw an update earlier on your Cambridge operations, can you remind of the details and the rationale behind the acquisition of Cambridge Graphene? A1: Sure, so things are moving very quickly for us, we announced that we’ve acquired a majority stake in Cambridge Graphene, which is a spin-out for the University of Cambridge, a couple of weeks ago. On the back of that, we had an over-subscribed placing in order to get the capital equipment required to really start to take that technology and to develop it at the University. The reason that we’re really interested in that is that they have a different type of graphene that they produce there from the graphene we produce as a result of our own patented process, the 2 processes work very closely together and in fact they operate in completely difference areas which enables us to cover all of the graphene market. The material that’s produced at the University of Cambridge is an ink and will be used in things like printable electronics and RFID tags, technologies of the future, that will enable us to really know what’s happening in our environment. So, it’s really important for us to really get going on that, we’ve got some really good enquiries and now we’re building up our capacity. Q2: At the time of your fundraising, earlier this month, you said that you’d be using the proceeds to significantly scale up both graphene manufacturing capabilities and marketing efforts and to take advantage of the substantial commercial opportunities that you’d seen. How are you progressing with this? A2: So, as Versarien were able to announce this morning, we’ve established a base now at the University of Cambridge, we’ve now got the kit ordered and actually commissioned in a period of about 10 days, which I think is simply staggering from our team and they’ve already sold their first order out of that facility down in Cambridge to a company looking for some graphene ink. In terms of the Nanene and the new materials we announced just a couple of months ago, I’ve just come out of a marketing meeting where we are managing expectations with some very very large customers at a very early stage in order to facilitate getting that technology really moving as well. We haven’t actually ordered the equipment for that yet until we can establish that we’ve got significant demand but it’s all ready to go and we’ll looking forward to placing all that equipment on order. We’re a relatively small team so at the moment we’ve concentrated on getting Cambridge up and running, getting it to the same sort of levels that we’ve got down in Cheltenham and then it’s all go on the Cheltenham facility. Q3: What does it mean having the equipment in place already, what does that mean for Versarien PLC? A3: So, we’ve got an established production base down here in Cheltenham, where I am today, and the guys are downstairs making material for the guys to sell we were just talking about in this meeting and that means that we’re up and ready, we’re able to satisfy the demands of our customers. We’ve just expanded on that by having this other capability down at the University of Cambridge and over the next couple of weeks we’ve got a very active schedule and we’ve got lots of opportunities for us to display our technology at various technology events. Having the equipment in place means that our customers are able to place orders with confidence that we’re able to supply, in fact one of our investors asked us the other day what would happen if he placed a rather significant order right now and one of our guys in the Cheltenham office said it’s not a problem, we’d be able to supply that straight out of the stock. For customers, it means that there’s a degree of confidence, in being able to place an order with us, to be able to satisfy their needs.
superg1
24/3/2017
14:27
I'm hoping things like Primarybid and what Vox are trying to do will start to kill off the dinosaurs and their approach, they have been so complacent and very often crooked. We all know how useful the mandatory nomad is. It causes more trouble than it fixes and the nomads clearly don't check out companies and news to protect investors. They simply resign when they realise they are about to get exposed. It's the biggest criminal network I can think of.
superg1
24/3/2017
14:23
Phoenixs I've read some highly inaccurate articles over the years from those sources and analysts. Brokers too I've heard some horror stories from a few re their forecasts where multiple and material errors are made and companies pay for the privilege of what is nothing more than a fee earner.
superg1
24/3/2017
11:20
Vasillis, yes I have been thinking that nano robotics could be a big market for VRS
richie32
24/3/2017
11:11
Not sure that this recent link has been posted - https://www.usnews.com/news/news/articles/2017-03-22/scientists-use-graphene-to-power-electronic-skin-that-can-feel Note the paragraph - 'Graphene, which is just one atom thick, is strong, highly flexible, electrically conductive and transparent, making it ideal for gathering the sun's energy to generate power, the scientists said on Thursday.' What goes for prosthetic limbs could equally go for a new generation of robots.
vasilis
24/3/2017
11:03
FWIW. The people who write the articles are on occasion so ill informed that it is not worth reading or for that matter giving away hard earned money for a subscription.
phoenixs
24/3/2017
10:31
My copy has just arrived. They also had a big spread on graphene a few weeks back and did not mention VRS.
rogerbridge
24/3/2017
10:29
I'm considering cancelling my subscription to MoneyWeek! The main cover feature in today's issue is all about spin-offs from British Universities. Lots of inches on Cambridge Enterprise, Cambridge Innovation Capital etc. Lots of stuff on biomedical spin-offs from Oxford (tipping OXF), Nottingham (ONC) and Durham (KMK). Not a mention of Manchester, advanced materials, NGI or even graphene. Amazing. What a missed opportunity. Especially as SG1 and I introduced one of their reporters to Neill months ago. Exits left, with steam blowing out of both ears. Rude letter to editor follows. EDIT OK, I've cooled down now. At least it keeps us off the radar of the numpties, traders and trolls for a bit longer. Got my share cert from the fund raise in the post today, so off it goes to my pension fund or ISA (not decided which yet)
shavian
24/3/2017
09:46
Just been reading report on evacuate.eu about RFIDs where it says "global item-level tagging business is expected to rise from about 180 million euros in 2008 to more than 6 billion euros in 2018 so long as RFID price tag is less than euro 0.01"
phoenixs
24/3/2017
08:50
The potential for VRS is indeed mind boggling. It is the most exciting company that has been brought to my attention for a very very long time. The problem for many PIs is that promises of wealth and fortune have been made so often with AIM companies and yet so often the only people who lose their money are the PIs, not the directors, brokers, advisers etc of the companies What I find so refreshing with Versarien is that Neill Ricketts comes across as an extremely hard working and down to earth guy. The recent fund raising could have brought in a lot more money but he declined because he does not want to have more dilution than is necessary to really develop the business. His tweets are very interesting in that one gets a pretty good idea as to what he is up to in the sense of developing the business and is very investor friendly. Having said that, it is now down to the product/products, which by all accounts are pretty amazing.
phoenixs
24/3/2017
08:45
sg: your last but one post - I think you mean £125 per gram ;0)
spike_1
24/3/2017
08:42
There are a few links to look at here but rather than list them all it's easier to hop across to this one and choose what you want to look at. Note the rfid bits https://twitter.com/neillricketts/with_replies
superg1
24/3/2017
08:27
I'm not going to comment and open day folk can't but where would investors who haven't spoken to the company want opex to be. Research levels have been £400 per gram. Bulk (up to 1 kg £125 per gram plus). A barrier to the market is lack of a commercial supply. There are high cost applications than can deal with such costs by virtue of high end cost of the product of low weight loadings in lightweight products like fishing rods, racquets and golf clubs. Then the other barrier is the cost of it, the lower the price goes the more market options become available. But why chase the low end out of the blocks when the high end doesn't have a supply. So where do fold think Opex is or should be given that some so far have been happy to pay £125 and up for up to 1 kg. It was rumoured that early AGM GNPs were sold at £1000 per gram.
superg1
24/3/2017
08:17
Trying to step around what is known without saying it. The cash required to expand at both Cambridge and the GNP side plus other costs likes sales staff no doubt was forecast in the £1 mill area. That tells you at least one side is less than £500k to scale up or may mean both are under that. I'd certainly put the GNP side well under that. Recent sales for near 1kg were obviously £125 per gram plus. Research levels are £400 per gram. So 4 kgs of sales on the recent bulk level return £500k. It would be a very big mistake to make an assumption of very high cost production based on the prices achieved. Some may have high opex costs but as no one can really do commercial few layer other than VRS then there is no price war just significant interest in a transformational product. So you can see if they got 4kg of sales the capex needed to scale up has been exceeded. If they got 100 kg across a year anywhere near current prices it's mind blowing for VRS. Then if you know what scale up options exist you realise how significant scale up is. Hence serious folk should make the effort and attend events and learn about such things. I think only one that attended the last event is on ADVFN many don't bother with this site.
superg1
24/3/2017
07:59
On fund raising the CEO would hope never to go back to the market again. If folk make the effort to attend events you can work out why that is possible on orders. Many say orders needed which is true but they won't know the potential phenomenal impact on growth options that would present.
superg1
24/3/2017
07:57
Wholen I know the answers as I attend events and speak with the CEO. They needed to recent fund raise to meet demand and anticipated demand. They had cash forecasts to run for near 2 years under current circs. They forecast £1 mill needed for what they wanted to do but took £500k extra to meet PI demand and closed the fund raise early. Just 10kg of GNPs sold at recent bulk prices over the year imo would put the group in profit. 10kg of few layer on the current kit on a 5 day week would take about 20 weeks. So you can see why they would want to scale up if they got kg level orders. I already know the cost of scale up and likely OPEC and covered such questions on the open day. It's simply a scale option on off the shelf machines. As they have been working off the lowest scale steps up mean multiple factors on cost v output. E.G. A cost factor of x4 could have an output factor of x10 etc. Hence I urge folk to attend events. We were specifically asked not to post certain info and everyone so far has kept to that. That's the benefit of going the extra mile. Absolutely stunning potential imo
superg1
24/3/2017
06:49
wholden, the recent fundraising at 15p was for "ramping" up of production. So a fundraising soon? I very much doubt it.
phoenixs
24/3/2017
05:07
Super, your technical insight is simply mind boggling! I wonder if you know or could hazard a guess at a answer to this question. You mentioned that they are making / producing "X" amount at the moment, due to the coming online of the new equipment / facility. You also mentioned that, that "X" amount could be "ramped" up during a time period. Is that "rampimg up" going to mean more investment in facilities / equipment? And if so, do you envision a "placing" possibly coming thru soon to finance that "ramping"? TIA
wholden
23/3/2017
22:24
Cambridge/VRS ink. Large companies etc. Plenty of twitter chat about rfids and mentioned in the interview. One such article lists Avery Dennison the largest rfid company. I've had a brief read but it's clear they chase lower cost options and were at one point using foil cut outs. As far as they are concerned if tech advances and costs cut the bigger the market opportunity becomes. They talk of the desire for direct printing onto packaging. It's said Cambridge ink works, high speed at 100 metres per minute in standard printing presses. It's a straight significant saving over silver inks. Demand imo will be high just for that and it will expand the rfid market. DYOR
superg1
23/3/2017
16:52
Some wonder what the demand may be for graphene but it's not clear yet mainly down to the fact that very little few layer has been available and many think it's still not available. DOW obviously think there is something in it but then they are working with Ford on light-weighting. I mention them as they did a $10 mill credit facility with XG. The conditions are XG can only use $5 mill and the 2nd $5 mill would be conditional that XG get another $10 mill backing. What they would spend all that on I don't know. So in all DOW would want them to have £16 mill to do the job as a starter. I imagine (with research) VRS would be way past 100kg per day on a less than that and wonder what on earth they could spend the money on. On that point I see HEAD have added another new graphene enhanced tennis racquet to the range. http://www.tennis.com/gear/head/racquets/head-graphene-touch-speed-s-3070/ Skis too Then we have the Mcalaren VRS Nanene enhanced watch seeing some other watches getting the carbon fibre treatment. http://www.scmp.com/magazines/style/watches-jewellery/topics/sihh-2017/article/2081453/light-feather-richard-milles-rm
superg1
Chat Pages: 131  130  129  128  127  126  125  124  123  122  121  120  Older
Your Recent History
LSE
GKP
Gulf Keyst..
LSE
QPP
Quindell
FTSE
UKX
FTSE 100
LSE
IOF
Iofina
FX
GBPUSD
UK Sterlin..
Stocks you've viewed will appear in this box, letting you easily return to quotes you've seen previously.

Register now to create your own custom streaming stock watchlist.

By accessing the services available at ADVFN you are agreeing to be bound by ADVFN's Terms & Conditions

P:35 V: D:20170325 13:42:08