Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Tomco Energy LSE:TOM London Ordinary Share GB0031782278 ORD NPV
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -0.001p -1.36% 0.0725p 0.07p 0.075p - - - 0.00 16:35:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Oil & Gas Producers 0.0 -0.7 -0.0 - 2.06

Tomco Energy Share Discussion Threads

Showing 52101 to 52122 of 52125 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
20/1/2017
09:11
Rmart, I don't think CB showing his cards before a deal is concluded makes prudent business sense! Every investor on AIM wants news from their investments yesterday! We have been starved of anything other than bad RNS's for years now, if this is the right deal then I don't mind if it takes time to make sure it's a cast iron winner! In CB I trust! fn.
fishyneck
19/1/2017
17:42
Will earth still be around when oil shale begins
wilson2
19/1/2017
12:45
The Company intends to focus its resources on its oil shale assets in Utah and is actively investigating potential alternative lower cost and scalable technologies which can be applied to such operations. ............ The above is what is going on, we just dont know which technology Chris is trying to do a deal on. I just wish he would give us an update on what the plans are. Does not matter if the deal is done yet, just tell us what we are looking at.
rmart
19/1/2017
11:38
I think we all are, good or bad, lets just have an update so we all know what the future plans are!
gjabrj
18/1/2017
15:43
Hoping for some news on the way forward sooooon.
barkerman
13/1/2017
18:20
BLM revises oil shale royalty ratesBy Dennis Webb Tuesday, January 10, 2017The Obama administration on Tuesday released new oil shale regulations establishing that royalty rates set in 2008 are now a minimum rate, with the discretion of the Interior secretary to set higher rates on a lease-by-lease basis.The administration acted with just days left before President Obama leaves office. Conservation groups had been hoping for the regulations' release while Obama was still president, and U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., wrote Interior Secretary Sally Jewell in October to urge that the draft rules released in 2013 be finalized before the end of 2016."While I understand that the Department has many priorities, Colorado communities, businesses, and energy producers have lacked clarity on the rules governing oil shale development for years," he wrote.The new Bureau of Land Management regulations will now provide clarity when it comes to the least amount of money companies will pay to develop oil shale deposits centered in northwest Colorado, and in Utah and Wyoming. That would be 5 percent of the value of production for the first five years of commercial development of a lease, increasing by 1 percent in subsequent years and a half percent in the 13th year, to a maximum of 12.5 percent.But now the Interior secretary can increase that minimum rate for any given lease, prior to a lease sale. The annual escalation schedule after five years would still apply, resulting in a higher maximum rate as well."This approach allows the Secretary to consider all relevant factors, including geology, technology, costs, and market prices for oil and gas. Until there is a domestic commercial oil shale industry, we can only speculate about what royalty rates those factors would support," the BLM said in the newly released rule.The BLM rejected alternative proposed royalty approaches, including a call for a minimum 12.5 percent rate, the same rate as the agency imposes for conventional oil and gas leases. It noted in its rule the "significant differences" between oil shale mineral deposits and conventional crude oil reservoirs. Oil shale contains kerogen, which traditionally has been subject to heating to produce oil from it. However, companies have struggled for generations to try to produce oil in commercial quantities from oil shale in the United States.The BLM said in a news release that the new regulations "also strengthen environmental protections by requiring additional environmental information and planning to be included in an oil shale development plan, including a plan to protect water resources, an airshed review, an integrated waste management plan, and an environmental protection plan." The BLM agreed to consider the new rules to settle a lawsuit by conservation groups.Ted Zukoski, an attorney with the conservation group Earthjustice, said Tuesday, "The new rule contains some common-sense measures to safeguard air and water so critical to our Western communities. But it fails to protect taxpayers because it retains low, low royalty rates meant to provide huge subsidies for this never-proven industry."The draft BLM rules were opposed in 2013 by groups ranging from the American Petroleum Institute to Associated Governments of Northwest Colorado due to concerns that they would create regulatory uncertainty and threaten the viability of an oil shale industry. Opponents to the new regulations theoretically could persuade the incoming administration of Donald Trump to reconsider them. Trump strongly supports fossil-fuel development.In its new rule, the BLM said called the effects of any uncertainty about flexible royalties small compared to the financial and technical challenges of producing fuel from shale at prices competitive with conventional oil production.The agency also said if commercial oil shale development materializes, it's unlikely companies would avoid federal lands due to the new rules."Mineral development companies must go where the minerals are, and the best oil shale deposits in the U.S. are located in part on BLM lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming," the BLM said in the rules.http://www.gjsentinel.com/news/articles/blm-revises-oil-shale-royalty-rates1
skiboy10
12/1/2017
20:59
There is always the possibility of the Nuclear Renewable Oil Shale System (NROSS). That should keep the environmentalists busy.
spangler79
12/1/2017
20:26
Oil ShaleOil in shallow (down to 2000 feet) shale is highly viscous and generally a solid called "kerogen", and has been essentially untouched by any economical technology and is waiting to be harvested. One of the richest areas of oil shale in the world is the Green River Formation, covering parts of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates that this formation has over 3 trillion barrels of recoverable oil in shale, which is over 150 trillion dollars at a price of $50 per barrel.There have been numerous attempts over the past 50 years to extract oil from the kerogen in the vast shale deposits in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. Early and present day retort processes employ heavy equipment to mine shale with kerogen to be heated in a big oven. The process requires between 3 to 5 barrels of water per barrel of oil produced and involves the disposal of toxic spent ash. This process proposed by Union Oil in the '70s is being adopted by Enefit, an Estonian company, in Utah today. In-situ approaches, such as those used by Shell Oil, AMSO and Exxon, rely on conducting heat through the rock using thermal conduction. The Inventor herein believes conductive heating of rock is physically flawed since rock is an insulator. Shell Oil's process requires 3 to 4 years of heating using outside power sources and a freeze wall surrounding the heating area to protect the environment. A Rand Corporation report stated that Shell would be lucky to achieve a 2:1 energy ratio ($2 of oil for $1 input power cost). AMSO is using a similar conductive heating process using horizontal wells. Electrode failure has plagued the project. And finally, Exxon is using hydrofracturing to place conductive material in the fractures to heat the oil shale.Major oil companies, e.g., Exxon, Chevron, Shell, Union Oil and Occidental Petroleum, have spent hundreds of millions of dollars during the last thirty years in attempts to change the phase of the oil in oil shale from solid to liquid so that it could be economically recovered. None have been successful to date.All of the past and presently used processes require more energy and are based on physical processes significantly less efficient than the system of the '057 patent. Also these processes have major environmental disadvantages not found with the system and method of the '057 patent.The Inventor herein and the Inventors of the claimed invention in the '057 patent have assigned this application and the '057 patent to Qmast LLC, a limited liability company in Colorado. In this application, the environmentally objectionable and costly mining operations presently used would be rendered unnecessary. Furthermore, water is not required to recover the oil. Also, the time consuming, expensive and, thus far, unsuccessful attempt to break down the kerogen by inefficient conductive heat of the shale (rock) could be replaced by Qmast's efficient microwave heating. For comparison purposes, conductive heating by an electrical range uses approximately 6000 watts to heat a cup of water which takes several minutes while dielectric heating of a cup of water by a microwave oven uses less than 1000 watts and takes less than a minute to boil the water?
skiboy10
12/1/2017
20:25
I believe I was the one who shared the symposium link originally and at first I was intrigued by the reusable capsule comment. But on reflection I don't see how they can move away from the bentonite clay liner (preventing water leaching) approach and I'm pretty sure it just relates to their direct heating changes. Any deviation from leaving the capsule sealed would begin another long drawn out permitting/environmental process which we haven't got the funds to survive through. I've also been monitoring their patents and nothing new there indicating a change.Regardless the RNS said it was looking elsewhere so we must wait and see I guess. I'm in it until the bitter end.Will be interesting to see how Questerre approach their Jordan project. I believe they are due to update on that soonish.
spangler79
12/1/2017
20:19
May be of interest. Qmast's patent detailshttp://patents.justia.com/patent/20160010442
skiboy10
12/1/2017
19:24
apparently discussed at the oil symposium....still waiting to hear about what was said....anyone any news as RL were also going to discuss an update on talks with Total
gmb359
12/1/2017
19:22
spangler apparently not.....they are talking about reusing the capsules not sure how
gmb359
11/1/2017
20:23
I believe the reusable capsule comment relates to the change to direct heating rather than indirect. The spent capsule will still be sealed after one use but all of the direct heating infrastructure can be migrated to a new capsule. In the indirect method there was a lot of infrastructure pipework buried and left inside. Only the bulkhead based heaters/blowers were being salvaged/reused with indirect.I haven't found out anything else about the Jordan symposium. I'd have expected some news would have leaked out by now if anything earth shattering announced.I'm very confused about possible next steps! Hopefully some clarity soon as im sure the palm oil plan would have worked to keep us afloat. The sudden change in direction has to be due to some positive progress. Or we're bluffing to get a renewed offer from Total. No clue here.
spangler79
11/1/2017
19:24
[A] single microwave-stimulated well, which would be drilled in formations on average nearly 1,000 feet thick, could pump about 800,000 barrels. Qmast plans to have its first systems deployed in the field in 2017 and start producing by the end of that year.http://www.the-american-interest.com/2016/12/08/a-second-shale-boom-beckons/
skiboy10
11/1/2017
19:23
MICROWAVESA Second Shale Boom BeckonsCompanies are diligently working on developing techniques to tap a massive but largely undeveloped source of oil trapped in shale. Fracking isn't the only way to extract hydrocarbons from these rock formations, and a Colorado-based company called Qmast is attempting to use microwaves to extract oil from kerogen trapped in shale. Ozy reports:[P]roducers are experimenting with ways to [microwave] previously unextractable oil resources with microwaves, which has the potential to kick-start an even bigger energy revolution than fracking - and appease environmentalists while they're at it...Oil giants BP and ConocoPhillips are pouring resources into developing similar extraction techniques, which can be far less water- and energy-intensive than fracking. [...][A] single microwave-stimulated well, which would be drilled in formations on average nearly 1,000 feet thick, could pump about 800,000 barrels. Qmast plans to have its first systems deployed in the field in 2017 and start producing by the end of that year.Kearl claims there are multiple environmental advantages to this technique. Fracking can slurp up to 10 million gallons of water per operation - not good, especially in the arid West. "We don't need water for our process," [Peter Kearl, co-founder and CTO of Qmast] says, "and we don't have wastewater to dispose of afterward." In fact, microwave extraction might produce water - one barrel of water for every three barrels of oil. In situ recovery using microwaves also avoids the massive environmental impact of mining and then processing the kerogen. What's more, natural gas that often is flared off in conventional oil-well production could be used to power the generator that creates the microwaves.This microwaving process is distinct from hydraulic fracturing, and the kind of oil it's looking to extract is distinct from the kind targeted by fracking operations. Most of the crude that's been unleashed as part of the shale boom this past decade has fallen under the category of "tight oil," which designates petroleum deposits trapped in relatively impermeable rock that are pulled out of the ground by fracturing the layer they lie and pulling the resultant slurry out.This new microwave technique targets kerogen, a less mature variety of oil deposits in shale rock that needs to be heated up in order to separate out the usable crude from other organic matter. The United States has massive quantities of this type of shale oil, but companies have struggled to find a way to profitably plumb it. Michael Levi has an excellent run-down of the history of this niche industry in his book The Power Surge (which is worth taking the time to read, if you haven't already).Qmast is hoping it can microwave the kerogen underground and pull the heated oil up afterwards. If it can successfully demonstrate an ability to pull this off profitably at a commercial scale, not only will the U.S. shale revolution receive an enormous shot in the arm, the industry will also be able to explore a new type of drilling that doesn't produce the wastewater concerns that have so concerned environmentalists.This specific type of drilling has a sizable history of failed attempts at fully capitalizing on our vast kerogen resources, though, so we shouldn't bust out the party balloons just yet. Still, if there's one thing fracking has taught us these last few years, it's that the American oil industry has an uncanny ability to find new technological solutions to problems long thought intractable.Posted: Dec 8, 2016 8:27 AM
skiboy10
11/1/2017
19:21
MICROWAVESA Second Shale Boom BeckonsCompanies are diligently working on developing techniques to tap a massive but largely undeveloped source of oil trapped in shale. Fracking isn't the only way to extract hydrocarbons from these rock formations, and a Colorado-based company called Qmast is attempting to use microwaves to extract oil from kerogen trapped in shale. Ozy reports:[P]roducers are experimenting with ways to [microwave] previously unextractable oil resources with microwaves, which has the potential to kick-start an even bigger energy revolution than fracking - and appease environmentalists while they're at it...Oil giants BP and ConocoPhillips are pouring resources into developing similar extraction techniques, which can be far less water- and energy-intensive than fracking. [...][A] single microwave-stimulated well, which would be drilled in formations on average nearly 1,000 feet thick, could pump about 800,000 barrels. Qmast plans to have its first systems deployed in the field in 2017 and start producing by the end of that year.
skiboy10
11/1/2017
18:37
Red Leaf are proposing to amend technology to reuse capsules so who knows where that will go and what TOTAL will make of it. Has anyone heard any more from the 2016 oil shale symposium nov 22nd???
gmb359
11/1/2017
14:38
Enefit were having problems with their process from what I remember. Their monster patch of land is just north east of ours but on private land so no pressure from the state on timing. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQC0cfwB2hE&t=273s). Since they have so much land I don't think they are in a hurry to buy ours and their process would be too expensive for us. MCW Energy have an interesting process for the oil sands but I don't think it's capable of processing our Oil Shale. The Qmast microwave technology seems to most suitable alternate but seems too early in its lifecycle to contemplate at the moment.
spangler79
11/1/2017
13:59
Interesting find Skiboy.... fn.
fishyneck
11/1/2017
13:58
No idea if there is any association to TOM but Enefit are also active in Utah and currently going through the permitting process.
skiboy10
11/1/2017
13:55
http://enefitutah.com/benefits/an-efficient-low-cost-resource/
skiboy10
11/1/2017
13:50
The Company intends to focus its resources on its oil shale assets in Utah and is actively investigating potential alternative lower cost and scalable technologies which can be applied to such operations.
skiboy10
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