Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Shangri-LA Asia LSE:SHA London Ordinary Share BMG8063F1068 ORD HK$1
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +HKD0.00 +0.00% HKD24.85 HKD0.00 HKD0.00 - - - 0.00 05:00:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
- - - - 0.00

Shangri-LA Asia Share Discussion Threads

Showing 64701 to 64721 of 64725 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
16/1/2017
20:48
Interesting article by Ganesh...will be interesting if the Euro population at large is still in favour of the Brussels governance as he asserts, if the youth are still unemployed/ underemployed over the next decade.
mr roper
16/1/2017
20:43
I presume that any trade deal between U.K. And USA will only include goods not made in the USA - or maybe UK is acceptable in a way that Mexico/China isn't? Interesting article from Ganesh, Simon. However, I still maintain my belief that politicians make lots of noise, whereas technologists make all the actual changes.
blusteradjuster
16/1/2017
20:19
Spittingbarrel Let's hope Auryn does well! If I had spare funds, I'd be looking to buy more on a pull back too.
jimbowen30
16/1/2017
19:58
I can only encourage you to look beyond the illusion henry.
hazl
16/1/2017
19:50
Janan Ganesh - 16/1/17: The EU’s death will not save conservatives Theresa May has the power to stun smart people with old news. This week Britain’s prime minister will recapitulate her openness to life outside the single market, perhaps even the customs union, for the higher treasure of national self-rule. Foreign capitals may begin to understand that she means it. Currency traders will taste what gallows-humorists call the “May diet”: she opens her mouth and just watch those pounds fall. The best and worst thing about this prime minister is a certain narrowness of vision. She can set a goal and chase it with a greyhound’s blinkers. It is why she simultaneously demands less immigration, even of the skilled kind, and a “global Britain”. To her, they are discrete projects. Someone more given to abstract reasoning would see one confounds the other. But then, and this is where her plodding virtues kick in, someone more given to abstract reasoning would treat EU exit as less a technical procedure than a historic Moment: the start of the end of the EU itself. They would infer too much from one close referendum in one unusually Eurosceptic nation, multiply it by recent crises of the euro and refugee absorption, and come up with the most excitable possible account of where events are heading. As he argued for exit last year, Michael Gove, then in the cabinet, willed the “democratic liberation of a whole continent”. His recent interviewee, US President-elect Donald Trump, sees little future in the “vehicle for Germany” based in Brussels. There are paler versions of this view among ministers, conservatism’s pamphleteers and donors to the Leave campaign. Because most Leave voters were practical sorts vexed by immigration, we forget the intellectual commitment of some of those who persuaded them. They do not just dislike the EU, they dislike it more than almost anything else. For them, a coherent nation under a sovereign state is the way humans are meant to be governed. The EU constitutes something like an affront to nature, and will be weeded out of existence like bad genes. The referendum gave evolution a nudge. They won it for all Europeans, you understand. This sense of destiny explains their goodwill towards Mr Trump and the quickness to pin the Ukraine crisis on European over-reach. They have no particular taste for strongmen. They mean it when they talk up their own idealism. Russian President Vladimir Putin and Mr Trump just happen to be useful as antagonists of the real, doomed foe — as usherers-in of a more familiar world. Once you smell the cold war residue on them (my enemy’s enemy is my accomplice), you wonder if these ideologues might be as prescient now as their forebears were before 1989. Pierre Moscovici, the European economic affairs commissioner, is brave to disregard as “bad fantasy” any prospect of further EU departures. All the same, the evidence leans his way. The continent is not clamouring to leave the EU. If the referendum sparked a change in sentiment, it eludes Eurobarometer and other surveys. Brussels is less popular than a decade ago but still favoured over national governments. Most member states have wounding memories of independence — war, dictatorship, penury — from which supranational institutions represent escape. The patience with the project in southern Europe, where sovereign debt crises born of the euro immiserated millions, is the only thing I have seen humble a federalist technocrat. You need not share this deep faith in European destiny to recognise it as a — perhaps the — fact of politics in this part of the world. The EU survives on it. The notion that Britain did what some continentals are summoning the mettle to do any day now deserves a measure of Moscivician disdain. Joining the EU was their “democratic liberation”. If belief in the EU’s transience were confined to a sect of conservatives who, emotionally, never left university, it would be benign enough. But it addles the thoughts of people who matter. There are ministers and advisers who, pushed in private on the exit details, on the potential snags for trade, resort to the hope the EU will solve the problem by disappearing. Teleology is infectious as it saves you from thinking too hard. Hugo Young captured an older version of this mentality in This Blessed Plot, his 1998 history of Britain and the EU. London’s slightly arch elite could never believe the Europeans were serious about this fly-by-night plan for integration. The coal and steel community, the Common Market, the single currency: at every stage there was amused British disbelief, and therefore British unpreparedness. Bet against the EU if you will, but not with your foreign policy.
simon gordon
16/1/2017
19:03
Beeks, Was fascinating to see the picture of the Backstabber (Gove) fanboying with Trump. Two hard right peas in a pod. Interesting comment I picked up the other day is that Tory centre right have become hard right to stop the hard right.
simon gordon
16/1/2017
18:39
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-01-15/davos-elite-struggle-answers-cower-silent-fear-while-eating-40-hot-dogs
mr roper
16/1/2017
16:39
I agree with the previous post. There are repeat,many types of capitalism .....it is the neo-liberal capitalism that is ruining our individual ideals,in my opinion. Our quality of living is the important thing.
hazl
16/1/2017
16:08
From Cap-X. Along similar lines: Only 32 per cent of Americans under 30 have a positive view of capitalism, compared to 43 per cent who approve of socialism. Barely 30 per cent of Americans born in the 1980s – and about the same proportion of Britons – think it is “essentialR21; to live in a democracy. The British public, meanwhile, overwhelmingly support renationalising the railways, jacking up taxes on the rich, and the imposition of rent controls. They largely believe that capitalism creates an unfair society, that managers of big businesses and even entrepreneurs are not to be trusted, and that between half and a third of the price of everything they buy is creamed off in pure profit. In short, if you ask the average citizen the question “What has capitalism ever done for us?”, the answer will come back: “Not much.”
ptolemy
16/1/2017
15:31
Some important dates this week: May speech 17/1 Bradley turn date 18/1 Yellen speech 18/1 EU CB meeting 19/1 China Q4 GDP 20/1 Trump's inauguration 20/1
ptolemy
16/1/2017
15:08
hazl...by virtue of the fact we still have too much debt which sucks money from public spending we still spend too much per GDP. As a country we have voted to continue trying to reduce public spending so we can reduce taxes. Labour is of the opposite opinion but they are unloved. The 'THEY' you refer to are the voters. The polls suggest we don't care too much about the left wing media endlessly trying to make the NHS a major vote winner. It isn't! hTTp://www.ukpublicspending.co.uk/past_spending
henryatkin
16/1/2017
14:55
Jimbowen - checked out Auryn, looks interesting so I've just bought a small amount and may buy more if they dip at all.
spittingbarrel
16/1/2017
14:37
Some profit takers today on a trading update from IDP showing revenues up 80% seems to present a buying opportunity. http://uk.advfn.com/stock-market/london/innovaderma-IDP/share-news/InnovaDerma-PLC-Trading-Statement/73616502
beautybelle
16/1/2017
14:34
Ha! I can confidently say I've never hit anyone in my life. It's on the bucket list to do though :)
beeks of arabia
16/1/2017
14:33
beeks.....8-) I am wondering about paying for an e-book that I have been dipping in and out of. It has a wealth of information and clears up any misgivings people might have between the distinction between conspiracy theory and fact in these matters. 'International Political Economy in the 21st Century:contemporary issues and analysis. It is written by university lecturer Roy Smith,Imad Amis and Christopher Farrander. An example........ 'structuralism aims to show how global capitalism ensures that the powerful and wealthy(state individuals and corporations)combine to prosper at the expense of the world's powerless.' 'Structuralism is concerned with the hierarchical systemic nature of international political economy as opposed to states acting as autonomous units.' Found it fascinating so far.
hazl
16/1/2017
14:28
might just be you, beeks...Interesting to note the previous posts on tolerance..lol
mr roper
16/1/2017
14:05
So trump is keen to do a trade deal with us, and the press/brexit supporting politicians are lapping it up.Great stuff. I presume he left off the last 3 words - "on Americas terms". Has he given the impression that he is about to be a charitable president?Not an in/out post by the way, just an observation at how manipulative politicians/the press can be.On another note, is it just me or has Michael Gove got a face you wouldn't tire of punching?
beeks of arabia
16/1/2017
13:58
It is education that provides tolerance and breadth of vision, however that education is realised, whether it be from tutor, travel or self-learning or indeed a combination.
hazl
16/1/2017
13:29
Ptolemy, As it is said, travel broadens the mind.
simon gordon
16/1/2017
13:12
GED has finally used it's cash like to become a support vessel owner in GoM. Market not liking today, but possibly an interesting transaction. Edit - autocorrect says Ted :(
hpcg
16/1/2017
13:06
At last people are beginning to see what they have done to the NHS.
hazl
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