Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Sainsbury LSE:SBRY London Ordinary Share GB00B019KW72 ORD 28 4/7P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -3.00p -1.18% 250.40p 230.00p 290.00p 253.80p 249.80p 253.60p 2,748,710 17:30:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Food & Drug Retailers 26,224.0 503.0 17.5 14.3 5,482.92

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Sainsbury (SBRY) Most Recent Trades

Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
2017-06-22 16:10:22250.8682,535207,048.70NT
2017-06-22 16:05:33250.612,8617,169.89NT
2017-06-22 16:02:13251.7821,08753,091.85NT
2017-06-22 16:01:28251.4637,57494,483.23NT
2017-06-22 16:01:27250.426,11015,300.75NT
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Sainsbury (SBRY) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
22/6/2017
09:20
Sainsbury Daily Update: Sainsbury is listed in the Food & Drug Retailers sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker SBRY. The last closing price for Sainsbury was 253.40p.
Sainsbury has a 4 week average price of 249.80p and a 12 week average price of 249.80p.
The 1 year high share price is 283.60p while the 1 year low share price is currently 211.50p.
There are currently 2,189,663,702 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 15,062,321 shares. The market capitalisation of Sainsbury is £5,482,917,909.81.
10/5/2017
14:09
imperial3: Encouraging to see the share price recover.
14/3/2017
10:56
alphorn: Share price hovering too close to my strike (270p) for Friday's options expiry; rolled out further (280p strike) for a bit more premium.
01/3/2017
11:13
loganair: Alastair Mundy, whose Temple Bar Investment Trust is the absolute top performer in the AIC UK Equity Income sector over the past year, has revealed the reasons why he has been buying Sainsbury shares. ‘Over the last few years the portfolio has held two food retailers, Tesco and Wm Morrison, both of which are now recovering after their poor trading experience of previous years. We invested in these two companies as we believed they could outperform the very competitive food retail market rather than because we thought that the sales pool of this mature market was likely to increase significantly or that industry profitability would greatly exceed previous peaks. Whilst we retain this view, there is now evidence of improving market dynamics with lower capital expenditure and the return of food price inflation. Just as importantly, the larger retailers are competing more successfully against the discounters. The discounters have grown market share by selling good quality food at very low prices, retailed in low cost formats, but the incumbents are now pricing much more keenly, have improved product quality and increased service standards. Consequently, the extraordinary sales and profits growth of the discounters have probably peaked and the market’s assumption of sizeable market share increases over the next few years may be too optimistic.’ He added, ‘This increases our confidence that the larger food retailers can continue their recovery and so we have added J Sainsbury to the portfolio. Sainsbury’s valuation has begun to look somewhat anomalous versus that of its peers; in enterprise value terms (i.e. equity value plus the group’s net debt), Sainsbury is currently valued at approximately 25% of its sales whereas both Morrison and Tesco are valued at more than 40% of their revenues. Sainsbury’s purchase of the Home Retail Group, the owner of Argos, could prove to be a compelling deal as it will allow the group to make more productive use of its excess space and drive significant footfall, whilst creating an enterprise with more than 2,000 collection points. The Argos deal clearly has some risks (both in terms of being a management distraction and pushing Sainsbury more into competition with Amazon) but we feel these are adequately reflected in the share price.’
27/2/2017
13:18
alphorn: Share price remaining close to my (call) March strike price of 270p - needs watching!
11/1/2017
11:10
careful: Argos should help SBRY to compete with Amazon. talking of Amazon, it is now valued at $378bn. share price is $796. last years earnings were $1.28 per share. Amazons insane historic PE is 621.
10/10/2016
11:18
christh: Lidl isn't in trouble now? THe £ is fallen compared to euro and as it imports everything from Germany apart from the vegetables, it must find itself pricing its stuff higher than Tesco, Morrisons,Sainsburys, Asda and others. Lidl does not sell brand stuff, it only sells its own stuff which is not quality,flavour,taste or standard. So not a match for the big 4. Going back to SBRY..... Argos is due for a good Xmas as a strong retailer during the festive period. The SBRY price will get to 300p not 280p as things improving. The Argos same day delivery is a very positive step to challenge Amazon and other online retailers. I wonder will it be another offer on the table for SBRY with the additional asset of having Argos. Whatever happens we have seen the bottom now we'll see the top of the share price. Be vigilant, watch volume and buy for long term.
09/3/2016
13:52
careful: what a load of old tosh. how can you analyse the SBRY share price with so many short positions open. over 10% on loan. i do not understand the logic of the shorters here. short at 400p ok that makes sense. ..but short at 270p is crazy. there must be better targets.
02/2/2016
08:05
edmundshaw: Deal is worth over 160p even if you assume Sainsburys share price was fair at 240p. What? So Coupe accepts 240p as the new normal for SBRY share price? While accepting that 100p was a vastly depressed share price for HOME? Seems that "We will not overpay" is director code for "we are prepared to overpay substantially and screw out own shareholders". Must remember that for future reference :-(
19/11/2015
19:40
loganair: Time to go shopping for Sainsbury’s? By Robert Sutherland Smith: Sainsbury at 253p after the interim results. The traditional quoted food retail sector is still undergoing a big change on an undetermined time scale. On that basis, Sainsbury shares may not look an obvious buy. However, I argue that the shares are attractive when the financial fundamentals are recognised. The shares, after the results of the first half of the current year, are priced at 253p and look pretty bombed out on those fundamentals. Our home grown food retailers (who of course sell more than food) have been in the grip of an insurmountable problem: losing market share to outside competitors who have been increasing their market share. Nothing can be more debilitating for a big business than the loss of scale and economic and financial benefits that come with scale of operations, whilst the competitive interlopers (in this case Lidl and Aldi, the Hengist and Horsa of UK retailing) are increasing and improving theirs. That is a bit like their fighting with one arm tied behind their back. The big question is how long it will take before the now more competitive sector settles down into a new equilibrium. No one knows and it is difficult to guess. Moreover, there are other threats to the current sector players – including the invaders. As our legacy retailers of staple products spot ‘on line’ shopping as a lower cost opportunity, internet operators like Amazon spot ‘on line’ sales of food stuff as a new market opportunity. We are clearly only part way through some pretty momentous changes in this sector; none of which are susceptible to clear visibility and easy prediction and certainly not credible forecasting. However, as always, there is the usual solution of some future consolidation amongst the retreating traditional players like Sainsbury, Tesco, Morrison and Waitrose etc. I suspect that will become a genuine prospect in due course, particularly if Amazon come into the food retailing business – taking even more British Exchequer tax revenue to other taxation jurisdictions no doubt. So, is there a case for buying UK food retailers and Sainsbury in particular? The elementary factors guiding us in answering such a question, include the following: that all companies in their activities are subject to degrees of uncertainty; share prices over time move to discount evolving news, facts and prospects; long term investors with wealth to preserve and hopefully grow, need a spread of investments and risk. That includes food retail shares of course. Coming to Sainsbury specifically, the best argument for investing money in it in comparison with other retail shares is that the share price is now discounting the difficulties. The share price last seen was 253p after the last interim results. About two years ago, the share price was over 400p. What does an investor now get for his or her money? First, a lot of sales revenue; on the basis of last year’s sales annual revenue at £23.5 billion on an equity capitalisation of £4.8 billion; put another way a share price of 253p buying historic sales revenue of an estimated 1,237p per share. Second, a very low price to book valuation. In fact the share price last seen stands at a 13% discount to balance sheet net assets in March. The market capitalisation of Sainsbury equity, currently standing at a value of £4.8 billion, commands an enterprise value which is three and a half times larger. In the balance sheet of 14th March last, total assets were stated as £16.5 billion. Also note that last year’s EBITD (basically profits before interest, taxation and depreciation are charged) amounted to £770 million putting Sainsbury shares on an EBITDA ratio of only 6.2 times on the basis of last year’s figures. Despite the gearing, interest costs were reportedly covered 6 times on an annual basis and 7.4 times on an interim basis. The shares price also stands at only 3.7 times last year’s annual cash and near cash held. Such valuations are strikingly low. Turning to the latest interim results, the disappointing news include the facts that the interim dividend was cut 20%; that there was a loss of market share and thinner margins; that sales fell 2%; and that underlying profits fell by 18%. The company is responding, we are told, by improving its own branded ‘taste the difference’ products, which, against the 2% fall in sales, actually grew by a reported 2% in volume terms. However, the incoming new CEO Mike Coupe talks of cutting costs according to a programme that seems ahead of schedule. The company is also increasing its convenience stores (very much the fashion in the sector) where sales have risen by a reported 11%, on the back of a one fifth increase in the number of such stores. Moreover, the retailer is developing its new Tu clothing offer – sales up 10% over the first half – as well as building its Sainsbury banking operation which is for the moment absorbing transformation cost. At a given point the bank should obviously be making a contribution to net profits. The market is estimating a 17% fall in earnings this year to earnings per share about 22p, putting the shares on a forward estimated price to earnings ratio of just over 11 times. The consensus estimate, at this juncture, is for a further 2% decline in earnings the year after that. Interestingly, it forecasts top line sales revenue for this year as being static at £23.75 billion and pretty close to that again in the following year at an estimated sales revenue figure of £23.52 million. In essence then, the market seems to be calculating that Sainsbury will hold its sales, with a well understood fall in earnings this year but holding on to most of those earnings the following year. The market consensus also estimates that the annual dividend will be reduced twenty per cent in line with the cut in the interim dividend. At the 10.5p dividend payout estimated for this year and next year the estimated annual dividend yield for this year and next is 4.4% p.a. As I always say on such occasions, I am no more gifted in seeing the future than the rest of humanity. However, as a compensation for that lack of prophetic vision, I can identify value in the here and now. Sainsbury at this level shows quite a lot of what we call fundamental value, as indicated above. With the share price at a discount to balance sheet net assets, investors now are arguably being asked to pay nothing for earnings. It will be interesting to see whether at this stage and at these levels of valuation, the bears will be tempted to fold up their short positions together with their tents. Sainsbury is reported to have been one of the most shorted shares in the market. Technically, the shares have been moving sideways for over a year in a trading range of roughly between 220p and 290p. Arguably, the share price looks as though it might have broken out of the earlier downtrend that took it into that range. Have a look and see if that is your interpretation.
21/6/2015
17:31
loganair: Why I Won't Be Buying Shares In J Sainsbury By John Kingham: J Sainsbury along with the other major supermarkets, has been through the wars in recent years. Most people know the story by now, if only because of the more severe and highly publicised problems at Tesco. J Sainsbury: It's a supermarket Here's my extremely short version of the backstory for J Sainsbury. The big four UK supermarkets (Tesco, WM Morrison, J Sainsbury and, to a lesser extent, ASDA) had it fairly easy. As long as they did a half decent job, millions of shoppers would continue to shop with them. But then along came the Financial Crisis and the Great Recession, and shoppers had far fewer pennies to spare and more time on their hands to shop around. The result was a change of shopping habits to more frequent and smaller shopping trips, at local stores that focus on price more than anything else. That played right into the hands of discounters Aldi and Lidl, who fitted this new shopping behaviour like a glove. The initial response from the big supermarkets was to ignore the discounters, but that was a massive mistake and the big four have been losing market share and struggling to adapt quickly enough ever since. A highly successful company, until recently: things had been going very well. The company has a long and unbroken record of dividend payments and, in recent years, revenues, profits and dividends had all been going strongly. Its statistics for the last 10 years look like this: •Growth Rate (covering revenues, profits, dividends) of 6.4%, well ahead of the FTSE 100's anaemic 0.8% •Growth Quality (frequency of revenue/profit/dividend increases) of 75%, also ahead of the FTSE 100's mediocre 50% •Net ROCE (median over 10 years, net of interest and tax) of 5.4%, below the large company median of 10% So J Sainsbury has grown fairly quickly and smoothly over the last decade, including the profit and dividend decline in the 2015 results. However, its profitability as measured by Net ROCE (Return on Capital Employed) is weak. Because I use post-interest and tax profits as the "return" part of ROCE, this low profitability figure could be because Sainsbury's core business isn't very profitable, or because the company has lots of debt (and hence large interest payments) or other non-operational expenses, or both. In fact, Sainsbury's profitability is so low that it effectively rules the company out as an investment for me. I currently use the following rule of thumb: Only invest in a company if its 10-year median Net ROCE is above 7% J Sainsbury fails that test, so that's the first reason I would be buying the company's shares. But there are other reasons too. Its financial obligations are too large for my liking One of the reasons for Sainsbury's weak profitability is its large debt obligations. It has £2.8bn of total interest-bearing debts as at the 2015 annual results. That sounds like a lot and it is, especially as the company has "only" earned an average of £0.5bn in post-tax profits over the last 5 years. Another large financial obligation is its defined benefit pension scheme. Because the company must ensure that its pension fund assets exceed the fund's liabilities, it must pour cash into its pension fund if there is a deficit. And that's exactly what it's doing today. The pension fund obligations stand at £7.7bn, while the pension deficit is £0.7bn. That deficit must be closed, and the company has agreed to pay £49m into the scheme each year until 2020, which currently amounts to almost 10% of the company's post-tax profit. And so for J Sainsbury we have: •Debt Ratio (ratio of total borrowings to 5-year average post-tax profit) of 5.2 •Pension Ratio (ratio of pension obligations to 5-year average post-tax profit) of 14.4 •Combined Debt and Pension Ratio of 19.6 Unfortunately, those ratios break some of my other rules of thumb: •Only invest in a defensive sector company if its Debt Ratio is below 5 •Only invest in a company if its Pension Ratio is below 10 •Only invest in a company if its Combined Debt and Pension Ratio is below 10 So along with "too low" profitability, J Sainsbury also has "too high" financial obligations for me. As a result, I won't be buying the company's shares anytime soon, no matter what the price. The shares are attractively valued, if you ignore the other problems Even though I wouldn't consider buying the company's shares at the moment, I'm crunching through the accounts anyway so I might as well take a look at what share price might be considered "fair value" given its financial history. The caveat here is that this fair value would only apply if the company wasn't breaking any of my rules of thumb, but it's still an interesting value to calculate. As J Sainsbury has a slightly above average record of growth, its shares, according to my valuation system, deserve a slightly above average rating. With its shares currently at 261p, the company's valuation multiples look like this (compared to the FTSE 100 at 6,700): •PE10 (price to 10-year average EPS) of 10.9, which is lower than (better than) the FTSE 100's 14.0 •PD10 (price to 10-year average dividend per share) of 18.5, which is lower than (better than) the FTSE 100's 32.9 •Dividend yield of 5.0%, higher and better than the FTSE 100's 3.5% So in terms of valuation, J Sainsbury is significantly more attractively valued than the FTSE 100. Its share price is cheaper than average, relative to past earnings and dividends, and the dividend income yield is above average. And remember, the company also has a better track record of growth than average, so if anything it should be on higher valuation multiples than the index (ignoring its various problems, of course). To calculate fair value for the company's shares, I can adjust its share price until it has a middling rank on my stock screen. At its current 261p, J Sainsbury has a rank of 47 out of 230 companies on the screen, so it is one of the most attractively valued (again, ignoring its problems). For the shares to be "fairly valued," they would have to increase to 450p, which is some 72% above their current share price. At that level, the shares would have a historic dividend yield of 2.9%, which I think would be reasonable as long as the company's successful past could be replicated in future. However, the company's profitability is too low for me, and its financial obligations are too large, so I won't be investing at the moment. Note: Last time I looked at J Sainsbury's shares, I was much more upbeat. However, since then (May 2014), I have become more cautious about both profitability and financial obligations (partly as a result of the problems with Tesco and Morrisons), so under my now much stricter system, the company has gone from a buy to uninvestible.
Sainsbury share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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